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Old 04-26-11, 08:14 AM   #1
slcp
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Wheel dishing and rust, advice needed!

I have two questions that I would like some advice on.

https://picasaweb.google.com/1144866...eat=directlink

The first 3 pictures in this album relate to, is my wheel dished correctly? I have tried to take pictures straight onto the brakes from behind. I feel like the wheel is not sitting dead center in the frame, the bike is certainly a tad off balance when riding...what do you think? And should it be? I have had the bike for a year now and have only noticed this recently, I changed the freewheel and have serviced the hub but did not adjust any of the spacers on the axle...

The rest of the album is a representative sample of the rust on my frame. Of particular concern to me visually is the bit between the chain stays (what is this called?) which appears very corroded.

I am aware of the various ways of treating rust from searching on the forums, I would like your advice as to whether I should be considering stripping the paint of my frame and treating it as a whole...I really don't want to do this as I love the original paint job, but I really don't want to waste a frame more!

Many thanks folks )
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Old 04-26-11, 08:49 AM   #2
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Rust, that's only surface corrosion, from the look of the bike, any restoration would cost more than the bike is worth, leave it, it will be a long time before that rust goes through the tubes.

The wheel, can't tell from the photo, you would need better pictures, or a dishing too, if it is a concern, take it to a shop to get it trued, again, from the look of the bike, it's an old Peugoet, these were mainly low end, putting any money into it would be a false economy, there are plenty of good cheap bikes out there.
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Old 04-26-11, 09:18 AM   #3
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There's an easy to confirm to confirm that the wheel is properly dished on center. It'll tell you whether the problem is wheel or frame related.

1- Stand the wheel straight up on level ground, open the QR (or loosen axle nuts) and let the wheel settle naturally in place. If you have horizontal dropouts, center it in the chainstays by eye, and note the position in the slots.
2- measure from the seatstays to the rim on both sides.
3- remove the wheel and re-install with the cassette on the left, in the same position following the same. method as earlier, and re-measure from the seatstays.

Diagnosis-

If the seatstay distance is unchanged (or slightly changed) the error is in the frame
If the seatstay distance is about the same, but reversed than the wheel is dished improperly
If the seatstay distance changes to new numbers entirely, it's either both, or you were inconsistent and should try again.

Note it's critical that the wheel is mounted on the ground with the weight of the bike on the axle, so it rests firmly on the top of the dropout slot, otherwise you have no true reference for it's position. Many cases of suspected mis-aligned frames are simply wheels that are canted in the dropouts, ie. touching the top of the right, and bottom of the left.

As for the rust, use an automotive cleaner wax or one step wax which has a bit of mild abrasive to clean it up and seal the finish. You might not get the spots out without dulling the finish, so settle for whatever looks good. Keeping it waxed will slow further rusting, possibly for your lifetime. If you want to do a more thorough job, you can use auto wax polishing compound, then wax, but read the instructions so you don't dull the paint.
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Old 04-27-11, 05:35 AM   #4
slcp
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
There's an easy to confirm to confirm that the wheel is properly dished on center. It'll tell you whether the problem is wheel or frame related.
Thanks a lot for that, I will do this and see what comes out of it. I pretty competent at truing wheel so I would like to have a crack at dishing it myself if needs be...

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimc101;
from the look of the bike, it's an old Peugoet, these were mainly low end, putting any money into it would be a false economy, there are plenty of good cheap bikes out there..
Perhaps so, if it is not going to progress I am happy to leave it as is, possibly with some waxing as recommended as well. I am quite precious over this bike, we have covered many thousands of miles over the last year, rightly or wrongly I may be somewhat sentimental about it
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Old 04-27-11, 11:55 AM   #5
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Ospho will convert the surface rust to iron phosphate which is as tough as galvanizing, then paint over it.
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