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  1. #1
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    Begginer, I know and I'm sorry...

    Hello all, I'm new to the forum, I found it on google, and honestly I know I'm probably going to get flamed for my post. But I have recently bought a bike, and I have been having some problems with it. I can honestly say this is the first serious bike I've ever bought, and probably don't know what I've gotten into. I am 6'4" 212lbs, and I have a 26" mongoose mountain bike, but I just kind of ride it anywhere. I have noticed some slipping of the gears when I try to accelerate. If I try to stand and pedal the gears almost always slip. It's very annoying, and becoming dangerous, because I usually ride to the gym which is several miles of busy road away. I haven't gone to the bike shop yet, because I honestly don't have the time. I honestly don't know much about bikes, but I'm trying to learn. It's not really a passion for me, I just want to ride to be more healthy, and maybe have some fun. Anyway if anyone can help I would gladly accept it.
    -J.

  2. #2
    We haven't located us yet nealjoslyn's Avatar
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  3. #3
    Senior Member jeepr's Avatar
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    I would read up on derailleur adjustment as a start. If you are at all mechanically inclined, I think you can handle it.

    If that doesn't do it, get back with us.

    Good luck.

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    Formerly Known as Newbie Juha's Avatar
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    +1 on adjustment, if it is a new bike. If it isn't new, a heavily worn drivetrain could also cause slipping (chain + rear sprockets).
    To err is human. To moo is bovine.

    Who is this General Failure anyway, and why is he reading my drive?


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  5. #5
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    On a semi-unrelated topic - is it a 26" frame or 26" wheels? 26" frame is huge and I don't think mongoose makes anything that big. If it is just 26" wheels and the standard frame size, then it is quite likely you have a bike that is considerably too small for you.

  6. #6
    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DCB0 View Post
    On a semi-unrelated topic - is it a 26" frame or 26" wheels? 26" frame is huge and I don't think mongoose makes anything that big. If it is just 26" wheels and the standard frame size, then it is quite likely you have a bike that is considerably too small for you.
    +1. I have not seen a Monoose MTB that would fit someone your size.

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    I honestly have no idea if it's the wheel or the frame, it just said 26" on it, and it was the largest bike I could find at the store. I didn't spend a lot of money, I think like $200 for the bike and accessories. I would have gone to a bike store, but all of the bikes were waaay out of my price range.

  8. #8
    Senior Member digibud's Avatar
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    There are a lot of good tutorial videos online and you can also find quite a few books on bike repair. Many of the bike repair books will deal with higher end components. Derailleurs all work quite similarly but things like brakes and levers can vary quite widely so if you buy a book check the pictures to make sure the brakes and levers they discuss reflect your type.

  9. #9
    Fail Boat crewman
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    Flip the bike over and rest it on the handle bars
    Spin the cranks in the big front and small back gear.
    Move the gears back and forth through the entire range and listen. What do you hear?

    For a guy your size you prolly need a larger bike and the torque that you are applying to the cranks and drive train and probably causing the problem. Have you tried a A 29er or a regular MTB. Have you had a smaller buddy go off on the bike and see if he can get it to skip. If he can't skip it then chances are its that your bike is too small.

    Something there should be in your price range. All the bikes have decent parts and if your not racing just biking you should be fine with what ever your choose.

  10. #10
    Senior Member BCRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Handgrenade View Post
    I honestly have no idea if it's the wheel or the frame, it just said 26" on it, and it was the largest bike I could find at the store. I didn't spend a lot of money, I think like $200 for the bike and accessories. I would have gone to a bike store, but all of the bikes were waaay out of my price range.
    If the tag that says 26" is on the frame then that is what the frame size is. And yes, that's a huge frame for a mountain bike. But then you're a big guy as well given your height.

    Regretfully, though you don't want to hear this, $200 for a bike these days is only going to buy you bottom of the line for frame and components. But this doesn't mean that the parts you have cannot be tuned up to run fairly well. You will just need to learn how to tune them.

    A good place to read up on stuff in addtion to the links already given is www.parktool.com/repair . Hover your mouse over the bike around the rear derailleur until the right link box springs up and then click. It'll take you to a bunch of drive train related options where you can find the ones related to tuning the rear derailleur. In addtion make sure the rear wheel is sitting evenly in the dropouts and the axle nuts or quick releases done up tight but not "terror tight". Then follow the instructions for properley setting up the amount of chain wrap by adjusting the "B" screw and then lining up the actual cage so it's shifting properley.

    If you just can't get it to run well and it's still skipping then your only option is to take it to a regular bike shop and have it looked at. In particular you want then to inspect and adjust the derailleur hanger. If these are bent so that the derailleur isn't flat to the rear wheel to within a very close tolerance then you can often get ghost shifting.
    Model airplanes are cool too!.....

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    If the tag that says 26" is on the frame then that is what the frame size is. And yes, that's a huge frame for a mountain bike.
    It would be a huge frame, but unfortunately, X-Marts usually label bikes by wheel size, not frame size, and have limited numbers of frame sizes (probably ~= 1 frame size for most models).

    To the OP: Save your pennies and learn how to adjust and maintain a bike with your mongoose, and start trolling craigslist or kijiji for a legitimately large frame bike - you will ride further and faster with less discomfort and less energy.

  12. #12
    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DCB0 View Post
    It would be a huge frame, but unfortunately, X-Marts usually label bikes by wheel size, not frame size, and have limited numbers of frame sizes (probably ~= 1 frame size for most models).

    To the OP: Save your pennies and learn how to adjust and maintain a bike with your mongoose, and start trolling craigslist or kijiji for a legitimately large frame bike - you will ride further and faster with less discomfort and less energy.
    +1. Discount stores typically label wheel size. Don't know the size? Just grab a tape measure and check it. GOogle bike sizing for more info.

    While $200 won't buy much of a new bike, it can buy some really nice used bikes. The last time I bought a new bike was 1975. I have probably bought a couple of hundred used bike since then.

  13. #13
    bike whisperer Kimmo's Avatar
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    +1 learn to wrench and buy used FTW.

  14. #14
    Elitist Troglodyte DMF's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Handgrenade View Post
    ... I know I'm probably going to get flamed for my post.
    Nah. We only flame long-time members.

    Quote Originally Posted by Handgrenade View Post
    I haven't gone to the bike shop yet, because I honestly don't have the time. I honestly don't know much about bikes, but I'm trying to learn.
    Unfortunately, you are hooked on the horns of a dilemma. You will have to spend more time - at least up front - learning about your bike than you would taking it to a shop. Learning how to do it yourself will be the most rewarding in the longer term, but it may not solve your problem as quickly as you'd hoped - especially if (as I suspect) your chain is worn out. Then you'll have to replace the chain, probably rear cogs, and do the adjustments, meaning even more learning and possible some new tools as well as the parts.

    So. Have you ever lubricated your chain? How?
    Stupidity got us into this mess - why can't it get us out?

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  15. #15
    Elitist Troglodyte DMF's Avatar
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    "But be warned -- we accept no responsibility for how badly you bugger-up your bike trying to fix it yourself!"


    - stolen from UtahMountainBiking.com"
    Stupidity got us into this mess - why can't it get us out?

    - Will Rogers

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