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  1. #1
    Senior Member larwyn's Avatar
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    Another homemade repair stand.....

    Okay, here goes. I found this group when I came up with the need for a bicycle repair stand. My wife decided that she wants to start riding a bicycle to work and brought home an old '63 Sears Flightliner which needed just about everything. I've reached an age where I like to keep my work at a comfortable height so I ended up registering here in order to see the pictures of homemade repair stands. Thanks to everyone for all the ideas.

    As a base for the stand I used a piece of 1/4" plate that I had laying around which weighs near 20 pounds. I also have about a 25 pound cast iron plate laying on the base, seems plenty solid so far. The column is 14 gauge 2 inch square tubing at 64 inches tall. The receiver tube for the clamps is a bit of the handle cut from a rebar bender as it was the right size to work with 3/4 inch pipe and is centered at 62 inches from the floor. I made a tool tray with 16 pegs and a "cup" holder and added a couple of hooks to serve as a rear triangle type stand as well (it's handy). The most solid of the two clamps that I built was the Pony clamp to which I added leather padded, drilled and tapped, angle iron jaws. I also made a "quick clamp" from a Vise Grip brand welding clamp which has jaws of angle iron lined with leather. The two clamps are interchangeable, depending on just how solid I need the the frame to be clamped in place (the vise grip is easier to clamp with one hand). The Pony clamp is, by far, the most solid of the two as the Vise Grip arms have a bit of flex.

    As requested, here's a few pics. The upside down Monky Ward Hawthorne (?) is my wife's next project. Building the black and chrome Sears Flightliner was the reason for building the stand.;
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by larwyn; 05-27-11 at 05:07 AM.
    Larry

    It is truly amazing how intelligent we think a person is when he agrees with us.

  2. #2
    Senior Member larwyn's Avatar
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    A slightly better view

    Sorry about the cluttered pictures I posted last night. Here's a better one of the repair stand and a couple of the wheel truing stand that I cobbled up. I actually built the truing stand some time ago, only it's purpose in life was to hold an electric drill to stir paint in a 5 gallon bucket (I hate painting). Anyway, when I needed a truing stand I simply notched the top of the square tube to resemble the notch in a dropout, stuck on a couple of dial indicators with magnetic bases and, presto, a wheel truing stand....
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    Larry

    It is truly amazing how intelligent we think a person is when he agrees with us.

  3. #3
    Member duderdude1's Avatar
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    Looks good. Like the shiner in the background.

  4. #4
    Bicycle Repairman kingsting's Avatar
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    I like all the attention to detail. Nice job!!!
    There's always room for one more bike!

  5. #5
    Senior Member RookieRoadie's Avatar
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    Looking good! I'd be very happy to own either of them - leaning the bike against stuff just does not cut it Actually, how do you prevent over-clamping the bike when it's in there? Loving the bottle holder!
    Distinctly mediocre.

  6. #6
    Senior Member larwyn's Avatar
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    Thanks guys, I'm glad you like the stand.

    I guess I prevent over clamping by stopping just before it is over clamped. There's no gurantee that the tube will not be crushed with either of my clamps.

    I kind of cheated on the cup holder. I made several a couple of years ago and when I decided I needed a cup holder on my tool tray I just cut the one off my welding table and welded it on the tray instead of fabricating a new one. I'll get bored some day and make a new one for the welding table though....
    Larry

    It is truly amazing how intelligent we think a person is when he agrees with us.

  7. #7
    Dirt Bomb sknhgy's Avatar
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    I have a workstand "in process" that I haven't finished because the clamp part stumped me. Hope you don't mind if I borrow your clamping techniques. I can build stuff, I'm just not good at coming up with the design.
    more cops have been killed by donuts than guns in chicago it is a medical fact ask any doctor.

  8. #8
    Senior Member larwyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sknhgy View Post
    I have a workstand "in process" that I haven't finished because the clamp part stumped me. Hope you don't mind if I borrow your clamping techniques. I can build stuff, I'm just not good at coming up with the design.
    No problem at all. I just looked at what others and had done, then figured out a way to accomplish the same goal with the skills, tools and material that I had on hand. I bought nothing to build the stand, just used what I had laying around the shop. The most painful part was cutting the tips off of the arms of a perfectly good, made in USA Vise Grip 11R welding clamp. But in the end, even that was worth it I reckon. The Pony clamp will not flex like the arms of the Vise Grip does but the vise grip is easier to clamp down with one hand while holding the bike up with the other. Having both options is not a bad thing.
    Larry

    It is truly amazing how intelligent we think a person is when he agrees with us.

  9. #9
    In the right lane gerv's Avatar
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    Nice job...

    But I think my design works better for total cheapskates. And it is surprisingly durable.









    Also cool ones here:
    http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...diy-bike-stand

  10. #10
    Senior Member BCRider's Avatar
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    That's a lovely job on the stand on all counts there Larwyn. I bought a fairly cheap stand and hate the bike clamp so I may just borrow your idea as well.

    The trick is to find some rubber to put into the jaws on your setup so it's non marking. I may just try out the idea of silicone RTV caulking and ****** some onto the steel and then add a layer of fiber glass cloth soaked in RTV to the layer. That should set up to a nice 1/8 rubbery pad and the fiber glass layer should avoid the rubber splitting and tearing. Or I guess contact cementing on about 3 layers of old inner tube rubber would do the trick as well.
    Model airplanes are cool too!.....

  11. #11
    Senior Member larwyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
    That's a lovely job on the stand on all counts there Larwyn. I bought a fairly cheap stand and hate the bike clamp so I may just borrow your idea as well.

    The trick is to find some rubber to put into the jaws on your setup so it's non marking. I may just try out the idea of silicone RTV caulking and ****** some onto the steel and then add a layer of fiber glass cloth soaked in RTV to the layer. That should set up to a nice 1/8 rubbery pad and the fiber glass layer should avoid the rubber splitting and tearing. Or I guess contact cementing on about 3 layers of old inner tube rubber would do the trick as well.
    Actually, the leather that I glued to the jaws with contact cement seems to work quite well. I'm sure your idea would work as well.
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    Larry

    It is truly amazing how intelligent we think a person is when he agrees with us.

  12. #12
    Bicycle Repair Man !!! Sixty Fiver's Avatar
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    Nice work... our main clamp at our frame shop looks very similar and uses a re-purposed vice grip and we have yet to damage a tube.

    We pad it with fire retardant material as we often perform frame work in this stand and it can get a little warm.

  13. #13
    Senior Member KD5NRH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by larwyn View Post
    Anyway, when I needed a truing stand I simply notched the top of the square tube to resemble the notch in a dropout, stuck on a couple of dial indicators with magnetic bases and, presto, a wheel truing stand....
    You do realize that a quarter inch of surface rust on the rims can be a problem when truing wheels, right?

  14. #14
    Senior Member larwyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KD5NRH View Post
    You do realize that a quarter inch of surface rust on the rims can be a problem when truing wheels, right?
    I was wondering when somebody would bring that up, that wheel looks worse up close than it does in the picture, but it is what I had handy to hang on there and help illustrate that the green column is a truing stand and not just any old green iron stick......
    Larry

    It is truly amazing how intelligent we think a person is when he agrees with us.

  15. #15
    Dirt Bomb sknhgy's Avatar
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    Larwyn,
    Did you weld the vice grips to the pipe, and did you weld the jaws on? Just wondering if maybe you had to braze them.
    more cops have been killed by donuts than guns in chicago it is a medical fact ask any doctor.

  16. #16
    Senior Member larwyn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sknhgy View Post
    Larwyn,
    Did you weld the vice grips to the pipe, and did you weld the jaws on? Just wondering if maybe you had to braze them.
    I welded the pipe and jaws to the Vise Grips with a MM180 MIG welder using .30 wire and C25 gas (75% argon, 25% CO2). I used the AutoSet feature on the welding machine which, I think was set for 3/16" steel (plenty hot enough for the job). I slotted the end of the pipe to make it a tight fit on the arm of the Vise Grip before welding them together. I first set the Vise Grip to lock lightly with noting clamped in the jaws, then placed one of the pieces of angle on the side of the closed jaws in such a way that I could mark the two cut lines which I cut with a cut off wheel in an angle grinder. The jaws were stood vertically on the welding table and I stacked scrap under the pliers to make them square with the jaws before tacking, then welding them in place. Nothing all that tricky, it worked a treat.
    Larry

    It is truly amazing how intelligent we think a person is when he agrees with us.

  17. #17
    Dirt Bomb sknhgy's Avatar
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    Thanks. Maybe now I can finish my much needed, half built repair stand.
    more cops have been killed by donuts than guns in chicago it is a medical fact ask any doctor.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
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    Clever, if I didn't already have a stand I'd make one of these.

  19. #19
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    excellent, instead of leather you can use the foam from rubber flipflop slippers

  20. #20
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    Larwyn; great work - your stuff looks pro. I have got to take some pics of the repair clamp I jerry rigged about 30 years ago that I'm still using. The whole thing is based on a vise grip-type pliers I found one day with the adjustment knob under the lever instead of on the end of the handle. This allowed me to weld the handle into a piece of pipe that fits inside another pipe. Both pipes have holes in them for pinning in any position around the clock. Exhaust pipe clamps are used to clamp the large pipe to a 2x4 which may in turn be clamped or screwed to a stable surface. Years ago I had my shop in an unfinished detached garage, and this clamp was secured to the wall studs. I clamped a 3" length of 1 1/4" pipe in the pliers jaws, welded it in place then cut it in half longitudinally to make almost a full-circle hold on the bike tubing. I glued leather inside the jaw halves and it was ready to go. I have never deformed a tube with it and while not anywhere near as good as a pro clamp, it actually does the job. Clamping force is infinitely adjustable to accomodate butted tubing and high-leverage holds..
    Inquiring minds want to know.

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