Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,247
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    switching a 56 Surly CC's components to a much smaller CC and costs

    So my little sister wants a new bike. She's pretty athletic, so the bike would definitely be put to good use. I told her if she can come up with $600, I'll put it in the $400 for a nice cyclocross bike, kind of like a jack-of-all-trades for her since this would be her only bike. Then, I was thinking...I have a lot of spare stock parts from my Cross Check.

    Here's what I have:
    • Kalloy stem
    • Tektro brakes
    • WTB saddle
    • Tiagra rear derailleur
    • Shimano PD-M324 Clipless/Platform pedals
    • 12-25 rear cassette


    Here's what I would be willing to upgrade on my bike to put on her frame:
    • Alex wheel set (one of which had to be rebuilt at the LBS because I wrecked the rim in an accident)
    • Tires, either stock Ritchey knobbies or Armadillo's slicks
    • Kalloy seatpost

    How much might this cost me to upgrade? I already have spare tires, though.

    Here's what she would still need:
    • Headset
    • Handlebars and handlebar tape
      (I thought this might be a good opportunity for her to get something other than drop bars, maybe like bullhorn or moustache handlebars)
    • Brake levers
    • Crankset
    • Front derailleur

    Am I missing anything she would need additionally? What's the price range this would run?


    These are my questions: is everything stock on a 56cm CC compatible with say a 46cm CC? And how much would it cost to upgrade my components and how much her bike cost, figuring in the $440 frame, new parts she would need, and LBS labor? Would I save very much by recycling my stock components and donating them to her bike? Remember, she can raise $600 and I said I would put in the remaining $400, approximately.


    All right, thanks a lot! And I'm not set on this idea. It was just a idea I thought I'd run by BF.
    Last edited by SurlyLaika; 05-26-11 at 11:20 PM.

  2. #2
    cab horn
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Toronto
    My Bikes
    1987 Bianchi Campione
    Posts
    28,292
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You'd be far better off buying an off the rack hybrid for $1k then trying to cobble together something, paying MSRP for parts and shop labour hourly. Seriously.

    This is not a worthwhile venture given your questions.
    Mes compaingnons cui j'amoie et cui j'aim,... Me di, chanson.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    City of Brotherly Love
    My Bikes
    Raleigh Companion, Nashbar Touring, Novara DiVano, Trek FX 7.1, Giant Upland
    Posts
    1,060
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Unless she specifically wants a cross bike, at 46cm I'd be looking for a frame that uses 26" wheels (like the LHT).

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,247
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by albertmoreno View Post
    Here's what I would be willing to upgrade on my bike to put on her frame:
    • Alex wheel set (one of which had to be rebuilt at the LBS because I wrecked the rim in an accident)
    • Tires, either stock Ritchey knobbies or Armadillo's slicks
    • Kalloy seatpost

    How much might this cost me to upgrade? I already have spare tires, though.
    To start the answer to this question: I read a great review of Thompson seat posts on BF. The Thompson Elite seat post is $100 through jensonusa. Kind of pricey, but now that I'm spec'ing out my CC to my liking, I really don't want to put subpar components on it. Any other good seat posts for a reasonable price? Is $100 expensive for a seat post?? $270 custom wheel build at benscycles.net. That would be for Shimano 105 hubs, Salsa Delgado 36H rims, and DT spokes. That's $370 for my personal upgrades. Not saying that's the way I'm gonna go, but it's an estimate.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,247
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Bezalel View Post
    Unless she specifically wants a cross bike, at 46cm I'd be looking for a frame that uses 26" wheels (like the LHT).
    Well, I know she wouldn't use it for any sort of touring and I'm not sure she's a 46 but that's in between the 42 and 50, so I was just guessing. Are you saying 26" would be more suitable because of toe overlap? Is there any other reason?


    I'm gonna see at what point the LHT switches over to 26" wheels.
    Surly: "The ‘Trucker is available in a 26” wheel size across the size run, with an option for 700c in 56, 58, 60, and 62cm sizes."
    So I guess, size 54, 52, 50, 46, and 42 are 26"
    Last edited by SurlyLaika; 05-26-11 at 11:21 PM. Reason: researched

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,247
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    doing some google BF research, I found plenty of people who ride smaller CC's and Salsa Casseroll's. I don't think 700c wheels should be a problem except for toe overlap on extremely sharp turns. But we probably will end up going with a smaller cross bike or a complete 26" steel geared mtn bike, if I could find one...

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    25,260
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The real problem with what you propose is that you are going to have a bike shop do the installation. That will add a lot to your cost. A complete bike will be more efficient cost-wise.

    Thomson seatposts are great but costly and have no setback unless you get the "bent" version and it requires you have at least 90 mm of exposure to keep the kink above the seatpost clamp. Easton's aluminum posts are also very good and less costly. Look at the EA70 post.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,247
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    if anyone still cares

    I emailed Surly to ask them why the LHT is the only complete bike offered with 26". We'll see what they say. I'm sure there are other short people out there who wished more bikes had smaller wheels.

  9. #9
    headtube. zzyzx_xyzzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    804
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by albertmoreno View Post
    Well, I know she wouldn't use it for any sort of touring and I'm not sure she's a 46 but that's in between the 42 and 50, so I was just guessing. Are you saying 26" would be more suitable because of toe overlap? Is there any other reason?


    I'm gonna see at what point the LHT switches over to 26" wheels.
    Surly: "The ‘Trucker is available in a 26” wheel size across the size run, with an option for 700c in 56, 58, 60, and 62cm sizes."
    So I guess, size 54, 52, 50, 46, and 42 are 26"
    the biggest problems are fit and handling. In order to avoid extreme toe overlap on a 700c bike most mass producers give small sizes a slack head tube angle and steep seat tube angle, and often still somewhat too long of a top tube. The result is squirrely handling on a bike where you can choose between (a) riding with all your upper body weight on your wrists, or (b) hunting down an extreme layback seatpost and getting proper weight distribution but too long of a reach to the bars.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1,247
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by zzyzx_xyzzy View Post
    the biggest problems are fit and handling. In order to avoid extreme toe overlap on a 700c bike most mass producers give small sizes a slack head tube angle and steep seat tube angle, and often still somewhat too long of a top tube. The result is squirrely handling on a bike where you can choose between (a) riding with all your upper body weight on your wrists, or (b) hunting down an extreme layback seatpost and getting proper weight distribution but too long of a reach to the bars.
    Can that be remedied with a shorter stem?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •