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  1. #1
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    choosing the size of a replacement tube

    My tires have the following markings 700 x 38c, 28 x 1-5/8 x 1-1/2.
    When I visit stores like REI for a replacement tube, it can be a bit confusing.
    They have 27" and 29" tubes, but not 28".
    They do have "700" tubes but rather than "38c", they have sizes such as 35/43.
    Some of the "700" tubes have a "c" and some do not.
    Can anyone make some sense out of these tire and tube codes.
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Galveston County Texas 10 Wheels's Avatar
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    A 700 X 35/43 would cover your need for a 38
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Captain Blight's Avatar
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    28" is a marketing term. It is actually a 700C rim with a 38mm tire. Now, the thing about rubber is that it stretches-- I'm surprised you didn't know that, actually. So a tube sized for 35/43 puts your tube right in the middle of that range and is the correct choice.



    C'mon, people, think a little.

    Use your google-fu.
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  4. #4
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    Dude, this is a forum where people ask questions.
    You are way too high on yourself. It's a big leap between knowing that rubber stretches and that a 35/43 is a fit for my rim. if it said 35-43mm, that would make sense.


    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Blight View Post
    28" is a marketing term. It is actually a 700C rim with a 38mm tire. Now, the thing about rubber is that it stretches-- I'm surprised you didn't know that, actually. So a tube sized for 35/43 puts your tube right in the middle of that range and is the correct choice.



    C'mon, people, think a little.

    Use your google-fu.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by techman View Post
    Can anyone make some sense out of these tire and tube codes.
    Not only can nobody can make sense out of tire and tube sizes today but you haven't even begun to grasp the full extent of the goofyness. Believe it or not there are 2 different, non-interchangable 16 inch diameters, 2 different 20 inch diameters, and at least 2 different 26 inch diameters all in common use today.

    There is a glimmer of hope for the future. There is a trend toward identifying tires and tubes by their bead seat diameters (in millimeters). That's a good thing because there are more different wheel and tire diameters in use today than at any previous time that I can remember. Unfortunately, I didn't see any bead seat diameter numbers listed on any of the tube sizes that you quoted. We're still still some distance away from sanity.

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