Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 07-04-11, 11:48 AM   #1
1parkpointer
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Barrington, NH USA
Bikes: Giant Boulder SE
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Need more fitting bike to my body

The bike store where I bought my bike has closed.
I'm 6'-4", weigh 255-lbs and need help fitting me to my giant boulder se with a 23-inch frame. My first rides didn't last much longer than 30-minutes due to my hands going numb. So I switched the stock straight seat post for a Kalin with a 25.4mm setback and the stock seat for a Serfas with longer rails, also set back to the stops. Rides last nearly an hour now, but I'd like more time on the bike.
The bike came with a 2.5" riser neck stem that is about 4.25" long. A few searches at local stores hasn't come up with anything higher or longer.
I feel as though I'm still leaning to far down or too close to my body. Don't know if stretching out further or higher would be better, but something more needs to be adjusted or changed.
Any ideas would be helpful.
1parkpointer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-11, 11:58 AM   #2
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
Posts: 29,390
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
There are a number of fitting independent gurus spread out all over the USA. Some work within bike shops, some independently at home, in small studios, or at fitness centers with spin classes.

Scientific fitting is very in these days, with various systems in play, using high tech concepts like video & computer motion analysis to obtain precise fits. Personally I'm not sure these methods yield better results than the eye of an experienced fitter or coach, but they'll at least spot problems and get you fairly close to where you should be.

If you search bike fitting on the net, you'll find guides, tutorials, charts and fit system marketers, whose sites will list their trained fitters by location. I suggest you start with some of the self help tutorials, and if that fails contact a fitter near you.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-11, 12:09 PM   #3
jimc101
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: West Yorkshire, United Kingdom
Bikes:
Posts: 4,741
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Are your bars flat? if so, have you looked at ergonomic grips, lots of companies make them, Ergon, Specialized, Bontrager etc, they can help with hand numbness
jimc101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-11, 12:50 PM   #4
Jed19 
Senior Member
 
Jed19's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Bikes:
Posts: 4,228
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Start here.

http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/fitting.htm

This article is a classic from a very experienced "cycling eye".
__________________
Regards,

Jed
Jed19 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-11, 01:01 PM   #5
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
Posts: 29,390
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
If hand numbness is an issue, be aware that often it has little to do with direct pressure on the palms. The hand's nerves pass through narrow spaces in the wrist, and poor hand/wrist alignment can press on the nerves, or affect circulation. Look at how your hand aligns with your arm.

If the wrist is bent back, or twisted, or kept in an unnatural position for long periods you'll get hand numbness. Changing hand position or flexing the hand and wrist from time to time helps, but the best solution is finding a more natural hand position.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.
FBinNY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-11, 02:52 PM   #6
Ira B
Senior Member
 
Ira B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: Coupeville, WA
Bikes: 84 Raleigh Technium- 89 Shogun Mt. Bike-96 Miyata 914
Posts: 879
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jed19 View Post
Start here.

http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/fitting.htm

This article is a classic from a very experienced "cycling eye".
Great link.
Bookmarked.
Ira B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-11, 03:26 PM   #7
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Bikes: 7
Posts: 18,755
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 203 Post(s)
plumb line thru the BB, divides the cockpit in half ,
back of thyat line, ;setback is dealing with thigh length and weight bias .

then from the front of the BB line you have the rest of the top tube ,
and the stem extension ..

the parts of your body proportionally influencing that,
are arms and torso length.

Last edited by fietsbob; 07-04-11 at 03:31 PM.
fietsbob is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-11, 07:23 PM   #8
1parkpointer
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Barrington, NH USA
Bikes: Giant Boulder SE
Posts: 2
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
jimc101,
Bar has a 1.125" rise and angles back slightly towards the seat. Ergonomic grips would certainly help, Thanks, I'll be looking around for those most definitely.
1parkpointer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-11, 07:40 PM   #9
jimc101
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: West Yorkshire, United Kingdom
Bikes:
Posts: 4,741
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
What I meant by flat, was flat like and MTB, or drops like a road bike, as the ergonomic grips only work for flat bar bikes
jimc101 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-11, 07:53 PM   #10
BCRider
Senior Member
 
BCRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: The 'Wack, BC, Canada
Bikes: Norco (2), Miyata, Canondale, Soma, Redline
Posts: 5,456
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
While fit is important some of the issue, if you have not very athletic up to now, is just time in the saddle. Try doing more short rides with stops in between. Such as ride somewhere and then go into a favourite store and just schmooz for 15 to 20 minutes and then ride to some other store and schmooz for another 15 to 20 minutes. Soon you'll find that your schmoozing times are becoming less and less and eventually you'll be fine to ride right past one, two or all the stops on your ride. This will happen for two reasons. First your core muscles will tone up and carry more of the load. Secondly your arm and wrists will tone up and be happier to carry what your improving core section still can't support.

Being able to ride for an hour before the ergonomics of your bike bite you suggests that the fit is pretty darn close and you just need to ride more and take the sort of short break(s) mentioned above mid way through the ride or about every half hour of riding time for the next while. If the fit of your bike was truly bad you wouldn't even be able to ride for an hour at a time.
BCRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-11, 07:55 PM   #11
FBinNY 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: New Rochelle, NY
Bikes: too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
Posts: 29,390
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 70 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1parkpointer View Post
jimc101,
Bar has a 1.125" rise and angles back slightly towards the seat. Ergonomic grips would certainly help, Thanks, I'll be looking around for those most definitely.
before you spend a penny on new stuff, even stuff as cheap as a pr of grips, try an experiment.

Close your eyes and hold both hands out in front of you at shoulder height and width. Don't think, just do it. OK, open your eyes and look at the natural angle of your hands.

Now sit on your bike in riding position & look at your hand wrist and arm.

Odds are the hand is bent out following the angle of the bar, and bent back on your wrist slightly, not at all like what you did before. Plus, most of the weight is probably on the heel and there's almost no weight on the well padded base of the thumb.

If that's a fair discription, rotate the bar almost 180 degrees (no need to remove it) so it bends down and forward slightly. See if that gets it closer to what you did with your eyes closed. Tweak it until you find what feels best, then reposition the levers accordingly and take it out for a spin. Odds are your hand will hold up better, and if so, you can then experiment more until you have the best spot.
__________________
FB
Chain-L site

An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

“Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

“One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

Last edited by FBinNY; 07-04-11 at 08:02 PM.
FBinNY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-05-11, 06:30 AM   #12
hybridbkrdr
we be rollin'
 
hybridbkrdr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Quebec, Canada
Bikes:
Posts: 1,570
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If you have a bike where you're really leaning forward, that might have something to do with it. I think hybrid or a bike with a touring frame might help with an appropriate seat (saddle). There are sites like selle royal that have graphs to show which seats you can choose for which position.

Or maybe doing weights for your arms might help.

Also, higher handlebars might help maybe like these: Brave Stiffee handlebars
http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...?ModelID=35905

Last edited by hybridbkrdr; 07-05-11 at 06:35 AM.
hybridbkrdr is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:46 PM.