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  1. #1
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    How to remove this vintage Shimano cassette / freewheel?

    I've removed a lot of freewheels and a few cassettes, but I'm brain-dead on this one. There's no bulge in the hub but it does look like a cassette. Is the smallest cog the lockring? What is the best way to remove it? I only have one chainwhip. Thanks.


  2. #2
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    Is the smallest cog the lockring? <--- I think so. Thats a cassette just in case. 2 whips and u are ready to go.

  3. #3
    Senior Member clasher's Avatar
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    If you only have one chain whip you might be able to use the bike's chain to secure the other cogs while you use the chainwhip to undo the small cog/lockring.

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    +1
    It's a 1st generation cassette using a threaded 1st cog. Two chain whips are needed, but in a pinch you can get by using a chainwhip to hold the larger sprockets, and a Channellock plier carefully to turn off the smallest sprocket. If you have a piece of leather to protect the sprocket it helps, but if you're careful to get a good non-slip purchase it isn't necessary.
    Last edited by FBinNY; 07-04-11 at 01:17 PM.
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  5. #5
    bike whisperer Kimmo's Avatar
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    If the bulge is missing, I'm guessing you can't swap the Uniglide cassette body out : (

  6. #6
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    If this is a first generation cassette, and it probably is, a nice feature is each cog can be replaced individually. Thus, assuming you can find replacement cogs, you can assemble the gear combinations you want.

  7. #7
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    Ok good to know, thanks for all the replies. Looks like this will be difficult to replace, so best just to leave it on.

  8. #8
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    Is not hard, only the 1st one is threaded (if its like i think it is) then the other ones is a cluster that contains the whole thing, to take that one appart u have to take 3 screws out and thats it. Easy to do tho.

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    To clarify I meant difficult to find a replacement. This one is working fine so although it may be simple to remove, I don't want to have to look for another one if this one works ok. Thanks for the encouragement though.

  10. #10
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    Im not that sure if you can find replacement cogs, maybe somebody has a few moving around. If you need a set of hubs and a 7 speed HG cassette let me know, I have a set.

  11. #11
    Insane Bicycle Mechanic Jeff Wills's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ultraman6970 View Post
    Im not that sure if you can find replacement cogs, maybe somebody has a few moving around. If you need a set of hubs and a 7 speed HG cassette let me know, I have a set.
    You can get them from Loose Screws: http://www.loosescrews.com/index.cgi...ano%20Uniglide
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  12. #12
    bike whisperer Kimmo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ColoRyan View Post
    This one is working fine
    Hyperglide shifts much, much better but you need to file part of the cogs to put them on that hub, and you have to use the old Uniglide small cog to hold it together.

  13. #13
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    Two suggestions.

    1, you might be able to adapt this technique, either to unscrew the small sprocket while you use the chainwhip on the others to hold them still, or to hold the small sprocket while you use a chainwhip to unscrew the hub from the sprocket, so to speak.

    2, I seem to recall hearing that the thread for the "lockring" sprocket is the same as a freewheel/track sprocket, if so, you could use a 3/32" track cog if the outer sprocket is worn, as it would probably be cheaper than the uniglide one, and easier to find. I just don't remember where I heard that, so it may be wrong.
    Last edited by Airburst; 07-05-11 at 03:53 AM.

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    Hello. Odd first post, but did you sort this out?

    I've just joined after doing this search having got a bike with a similar-looking freewheel.

    In mine, no special tool needed. You just need to remove the QR skewer and both nuts from the non-drive side (take care of the ball-bearings) and lift the axle out of the drive side (again, careful of the BBs).

    The block then lifts off. Simple, but odd. I can't find any reference to this strange bit of gear anywhere on the web.

    Any further info gratefully received.

    Dalua

  15. #15
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    If you are unable to find replacement cogs you could always turn the cog over and use the lesser worn part of the teeth. If the cogs have a spacer built in then you may have to grind it off and fit a loose spacer on the correct side. This seems quite possible to me (idea courtesy of my mate Steve who has done this, but I don't know which freewheel cassette he used). I shall stand aside while all the reasons for not doing this come flooding in....

  16. #16
    Senior Member cruisintx's Avatar
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    in the absence of a second chain whip this is a good alternative if you have and old chain and a vise.
    Primary rides:

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  17. #17
    Insane Bicycle Mechanic Jeff Wills's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dalua View Post
    Hello. Odd first post, but did you sort this out?

    I've just joined after doing this search having got a bike with a similar-looking freewheel.

    In mine, no special tool needed. You just need to remove the QR skewer and both nuts from the non-drive side (take care of the ball-bearings) and lift the axle out of the drive side (again, careful of the BBs).

    The block then lifts off. Simple, but odd. I can't find any reference to this strange bit of gear anywhere on the web.

    Any further info gratefully received.

    Dalua
    That describes Campagnolo, various American freehubs, and the odd Taiwanese design. The OP had an older Shimano freehub, and was trying to remove the cogs from the cassette body. You are describing disassembling the hub and removing the cassette body.

    Are there any other clues on your hub? Could you post a picture?
    Jeff Wills

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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Wills View Post
    That describes Campagnolo, various American freehubs, and the odd Taiwanese design. The OP had an older Shimano freehub, and was trying to remove the cogs from the cassette body. You are describing disassembling the hub and removing the cassette body.

    Are there any other clues on your hub? Could you post a picture?
    What think I'm describing is removing the axle (and cones, and therefore bearings) by withdrawing it through the freewheel to allow the freewheel (i.e. sprockets with integral freewheeling core) to be lifted off a star-shaped protrusion on the actual wheel hub. This star-shaped protrusion seems to be there in place of the usual threaded fitting for a freewheel.

    I too was puzzled initially by the annular bit that looks as though you could get a splined freewheel tool into it if only it were not so narrow. The black end of the axle which can be seen in the OP's pic reading 'Shimano 60' appears exactly the same as mine. It is that that is withdrawn with the axle once both nuts have been removed from the other side allowing the freewheel to be lifted off the star-shaped thing.

    I'll try to do pictures later. Hub is Shimano, but needs a clean for more details. Again, later...
    Last edited by Dalua; 11-14-11 at 03:06 AM.

  19. #19
    cycles per second Gonzo Bob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dalua View Post
    The block then lifts off. Simple, but odd. I can't find any reference to this strange bit of gear anywhere on the web.

    Any further info gratefully received.

    Dalua
    Scroll down to the bottom of this page to the section "Early Uniglide" http://sheldonbrown.com/k7.html

    BTW, what you are doing is taking the freehub body off the hub. The OP wants to remove the cogs from the freehub body and for that two chain whips are the best way. I also have a tool called a "cassette *******" that can do this. It has a small length of chain that wraps around the top cog and has a little hook that goes around the chain stay. You then put the bike's drive chain on one of the biggest cogs and simply step down on the crank and roll foward.
    Last edited by Gonzo Bob; 11-14-11 at 11:57 AM.

  20. #20
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    That's brilliant - an exact illustration of what I've got!

    I now understand, which is also good.

    Many thanks. Soon the Elswick Stag will again sweep majestically across the countryside.

  21. #21
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    That worked for me (old chain in vice and a chain whip)! Thanks!

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Wills View Post
    That describes Campagnolo, various American freehubs, and the odd Taiwanese design. The OP had an older Shimano freehub, and was trying to remove the cogs from the cassette body. You are describing disassembling the hub and removing the cassette body.

    Are there any other clues on your hub? Could you post a picture?
    If I remember Sheldon correctly, VERY early Shimano freehubs worked like that as well.

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