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  1. #1
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    Gear Ratios, how do they work?

    Hi im interested in geting a knew cassest umm I saw that theres like 11/13 11/15 and stuff like that

    would i get a knew chain with that 2 so they wear together



    but can u explain to mean what the numbers mean.

    thanks in advance

  2. #2
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    I believe the numbers are the number of teeth on the chain ring

  3. #3
    la vache fantôme phantomcow2's Avatar
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    I can hardly understand your english, try making your message clear and use the right word. its new not knew. Where are you seeing these numbers?

  4. #4
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    sorry i have a habit of adding K to letters,

    but it says when I would go to buy a Cassette(sp)
    it is availibale int he following ratios
    11/13................etc

  5. #5
    Tom (ex)Builder twahl's Avatar
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    Usually cassettes are listed by the smallest and largest cogs in the set. The smallest will be your fastest gear for a given RPM on a certain chain ring, and the largest will give you the most pulling power. Basically 1 revolution of the pedals goes further on the smallest gear, and gives the most power on the largest gear. Road bikes have closer ratio cassettes, and mountain bikes have more difference in the gears. For instance a road cassette might be anywhere from 11-21 to 12-27, and a mountian cassette might be anywhere from 11-32 to 11-34. Getting a new chain isn't a bad idea just because they do need to be replaced periodically anyway.
    Tom

    "It hurts so good..."

  6. #6
    Aluminium Crusader :-)
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    The numbers refer to the numbers of teeth on the rear cogs.

    If you buy a 9 speed "11 to 21" cassette, the 9 cogs will
    most have the following numbers of teeth on them: 11,12,13,14,15,16,17,19,21.

    The smaller the number of teeth on the back cogs, the bigger/harder the gear,
    and the smaller the number of teeth on the front chainring (near the pedals), the
    easier the gear.

    Some people think that an 11 tooth cog provides such a big gear that is
    unnecessary, so they usually get a "12 to 23" cassette or even a 12 to 25, or even
    higher.

    In my opninion, it's preferable to buy a new chain at the same time

  7. #7
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    For detailed info, here is a link to a site to download a software package that will calculate gear ratios:

    http://www.machinehead-software.co.u...alculator.html

  8. #8
    Senior Member sydney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 531Aussie

    In my opninion, it's preferable to buy a new chain at the same time
    That's a potential waste of ALOT of money ,and that isn't an opinion.

  9. #9
    Aluminium Crusader :-)
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    Quote Originally Posted by sydney
    That's a potential waste of ALOT of money ,and that isn't an opinion.
    "ALOT" of money???!!! That's just hooey

    Let's do a poll

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by 531Aussie
    "ALOT" of money???!!! That's just hooey

    Let's do a poll

    theres no 'hooey' here is there.......???...thought it was just BS!....

    hitchy

  11. #11
    al-majnoun ma'a daraaja
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    No, new chain is not waste of "A LOT" money. Chain is wear item, as tyres or brake rubbers. Wear out, replace, repeat.

    Answer to original question: Roadracing have small number cassettes, as 11/25, for best horsepower (manpower?) at high RPMs. Horsepower makes speed.

    Hybrid & VTT have bigger numbers, as 13/32, for more torque. Torque makes ability to climb. All cassettes have ratios for to provide both, but compromise in favour of purpose for bicycle.

    Best is to replace cassette with same numbers, thus u will not have any troubles with shifts. If now u have 11/25, purchase same. Too high last number, and rr derailleur pulley can crash to cassette.

    Install new chain before is too late can prevent destruction on cassette. I report 2 000, 2 200km
    before chain wear out, some tell me is normal, others no. Chi sa?

    For chains, more expensive = less weight. If u can accept a few more g, u can purchase for less money.

    Example, in Italia, Shimano XTR 9sp = 21€, and HG93 = 18€. I purchase Shimano HG53 (9sp) at 11€, five at one time. Extra weight of chain for me is not importante, for I have 10, 15 kg on rack, lights, tools, etc.

    Just my opinions, good luck!

  12. #12
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    well im okay im 500m from the 2000mile mark on my bike. where I live i have moderate hills and flats what would be a good set up?

    oh and I would get a chan so the cassette and the chain could wear evenly

  13. #13
    Right calf grease tattoo Alphie's Avatar
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    I see that you have a Trek 1200. If it has a triple it has a 52/42/30 chainring and a 12/25 cassette. That is almost the same as on my Lemond, and that gearing is just fine for this area. My commuting route is mostly flat, but there are some hilly areas of Atlanta that make having the 30 ring nice.
    Without deviation from the norm, 'progress' is not possible.
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  14. #14
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    nice man, umm so would more torque= less straightaway speed but more speed up hill or?

  15. #15
    feros ferio John E's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MATTO
    nice man, umm so would more torque= less straightaway speed but more speed up hill or?
    Changing gears lets you trade torque against road speed. You use the larger rear cogs and/or smaller front chainrings to creep up hills without damaging your knees, and you use the high gears (small cogs / large chainrings) to go fast with the wind or downhill. Since I am one of those who feels strongly that 11- or 12-tooth cogs are useless with any chainring larger than 48T, most of my rear cogsets run 13 to 26 teeth.
    "Early to bed, early to rise. Work like hell, and advertise." -- George Stahlman
    Capo [dschaw'-poe]: 1959 Modell Campagnolo, S/N 40324; 1960 Sieger, S/N 42624
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  16. #16
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    so what categorys would be mid rang?
    ie chainring and cassette, i kinda want both but i guss its a trade off, i kinda dont wanna be working hard on flats..

  17. #17
    Elite Rep
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    Quote Originally Posted by phantomcow2
    I can hardly understand your english, try making your message clear and use the right word. its new not knew.
    God, does it really matter that much?
    Last edited by blue_neon; 11-15-04 at 11:21 PM.

  18. #18
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    well thanks to yall who helped me out

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