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Old 07-17-11, 04:43 PM   #1
P4D 
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Proper way to delace hubs?

Just cut the spokes? I'm clueless, how do I do it?
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Old 07-17-11, 04:57 PM   #2
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If it's a freewheel hub, make sure to remove the freewheel first. But yeah, I just cut the spokes unless I want to re-use them (almost never do).
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Old 07-17-11, 05:08 PM   #3
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If the spokes are the correct length save some in full length for future reference. You'll be glad you did. If a rear wheel save at least one from each side.
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Old 07-17-11, 05:13 PM   #4
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If it's a rear wheel remove either the freewheel or cassette first! I like to detension the spokes a couple ofl turns of each nipple before cutting them if i'm not going to save any of the spokes. I've heard it reduces stress and shock on the hub and i've heard it doesn't matter but I do it anyway.
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Old 07-17-11, 05:20 PM   #5
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If you plan to re-use the rim, detension the spokes first. If you go around cutting spokes then after you've cut a few the remaining tensioned spokes will pull the rim out of shape. In any case, I'd disassemble the wheel unless the spokes were beyond further use. Just work your way around releasing tension gradually.
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Old 07-17-11, 05:22 PM   #6
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I generally save stainless spokes, unless they've been damaged from chain drops or something. If they are galv I just get the small bolt cutters out and cut 'em where they cross. Make sure you leave the rim tape on if you cut spokes or they'll shoot out and impale the cat/dog/child/etc.
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Old 07-17-11, 05:26 PM   #7
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If you want to save the rim, loosen by degrees doing the left flange first, since those are slacker. That will reduce the right side tension and you can slacken those.

Same with cutting, I always cut the left flange spokes first, using compound cutters that look like mini bolt cutters.

BTW- keep your face clear, cut spokes can launch out of the rim like missiles.
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Old 07-17-11, 05:56 PM   #8
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DO NOT USE DULL LINEMAN PLIERS. I did, and had to sort of twist the pliers while cutting....and stuck a cut 14 guage spoke about 1/8 inch into my thumb. The pain was incredible, far worse than a shattered collarbone, torn quad tendon....just insane and very dumb
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Old 07-17-11, 06:15 PM   #9
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If you don't need the spokes...get that freewheel / cassette off first and cut away...

If the spokes have a history of good tension and no breakage - even moreso - if they are DT's or Wheelsmith's - reduce tension and unlace.

With radial wheels - detension a little at a time in cycles...otherwise don't get overly concerned with possible hub or rim damage. It it a lot easier to detension the non-drive or non-disc side of a wheel first.

=8-)
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Old 07-17-11, 09:42 PM   #10
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+1 on stripping gears off the hub first, cannot do it without the leverage of the rim later..

un screw each nipple a little bit in sequence, and go around the rim like that..

Time = money in the shop so cutting them makes more sense,
as all but the hub go in the trash.. then new rim nd spokes go on ..
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Old 07-17-11, 10:13 PM   #11
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Oh...since fietsbob brought up the "go in the trash" aspect:

http://www.mrrabbit.net/docs/spokeheads/main.html

This is the latest version of the "John Hurley" spoke head ID chart. The old "local to computer" version is deprecated. Look at those spoke heads before you throw 'em away - if you have something that's not listed - "known" or "unknown" - send me a pic and a graphic. I'll be happy to credit the source.

If you also want to help preserve the project grab:

http://www.mrrabbit.net/docs/spokehe...keheads.tar.gz

...and save it as "latest.spokeheads.tar.gz". Dump it on your hard drive and then forget about it. Should we ever need it - you'll remember where you put it.

=8-)
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2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
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4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
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Old 07-18-11, 03:23 AM   #12
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If you want to replace the rim, you may not need to remove the spokes. If the rim uses the same length spokes, place the old and new rim side by side and follow these instructions.
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Old 07-18-11, 03:37 AM   #13
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If you're going to detension them anyway, just yank the rim tape off first and use a power drill with a flathead bit. It's less than a second per spoke extra to spin the nipples all the way off at that point. If the slot strips out on a few, finish unscrewing the rest and cut the stripped ones.

Besides, junk spokes come in handy for all sorts of things. If I can find a use for junk nipples I'll be all set.
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Old 07-18-11, 10:38 AM   #14
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If you are going to keep or re-use the rim - or build up a new rim - NEVER NEVER NEVER - us a power driver that exceeds 180 rpm. An rpm closer to 130 is preferred. Using a high speed driver causes a "heat flash" at the rim seat due to the seat+nipple friction that you've just ramped up rpm-wise.

This will cause severe premature fatique at the rim seat and the spoke holes will crack much sooner rather than later...

This is why if you watch the video that pops up here once in awhile showing a factory wheelbuilding crew using the pretensioning machine in the process - the machine doesn't do it quickly speed-wise - but rather by driving multiple nipples concurrently.

=8-)

If the rim is toast already...then have some maniacal fun...
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Disclaimer:

1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
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Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life
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Old 07-18-11, 10:49 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrrabbit View Post
If you are going to keep or re-use the rim - or build up a new rim - NEVER NEVER NEVER - us a power driver that exceeds 180 rpm. An rpm closer to 130 is preferred. Using a high speed driver causes a "heat flash" at the rim seat due to the seat+nipple friction that you've just ramped up rpm-wise.
With a flathead bit, going more than about 120RPM is a good way to end up chewing up the rim when the bit slips out anyway. Still, even 75RPM is a lot faster than turning the nipples by hand.
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Old 07-18-11, 12:41 PM   #16
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Yeah, crap rims, but the hubs are good enough to get delaced and cleaned up. Sooooo glad I asked, because I would never have considered how hard it has to be to get a cassette off with the rim gone.

Thanks much for all the tips, and I'll check what I have against the database and let you know it its not there.
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Old 07-18-11, 01:04 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by P4D View Post
Yeah, crap rims, but the hubs are good enough to get delaced and cleaned up. Sooooo glad I asked, because I would never have considered how hard it has to be to get a cassette off with the rim gone.

Thanks much for all the tips, and I'll check what I have against the database and let you know it its not there.
A cassette is pretty easy to get off without the rim. All you need is a chainwhip and a cassette lockring tool. Freewheels are next to impossible.

Detension before you cut.
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