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Old 07-31-11, 01:18 PM   #1
Johnny_Bikey
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schrader vs presta

are there any advantages to either one
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Old 07-31-11, 01:20 PM   #2
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Presta is better at holding in higher pressures.

However Schrader is more universal, and you're more likely to find emergency pumps that support it if you run into trouble.


I use Schrader, as I run 70psi on my tires.
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Old 07-31-11, 01:21 PM   #3
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schrader will let you put in air anywhere like gas stations . presta need a adopter to do the same . other than that no.
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Old 07-31-11, 01:35 PM   #4
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stores like Target carries 700c tires with schrader valves but not prestas. so availability in a pinch could be beneficial. but seems beyond that shops all carry presta. I have both and haven't noticed any air pressure issues. and you can get rubber washers to use schrader in wheels drilled for prestas.
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Old 07-31-11, 01:41 PM   #5
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If the rim is drilled for schrader, then either will fit , adapters fill in the larger rim hole.
if P/V .. more metal remains around the smaller hole

advantage for very narrow and wing shaped rims.
P/V stems now come in some very long lengths to suit rather deep section rim types..
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Old 07-31-11, 01:56 PM   #6
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Johnny: No preference here; the adapter you need for a Presta fill-up from the more common Schrader pumps costs about a buck. I always keep a few with all of my Presta-equipped bikes for emergencies/give-aways.
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Old 07-31-11, 01:58 PM   #7
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I find the Presta just easier to use - Thats just about it...
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Old 07-31-11, 02:19 PM   #8
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You have to fight the Presta less when pumping air as it is more easily pressure-actuated (especially at higher pressures) and more high-end rims come with a stock Presta drilling. Having said that, I used to carefully drill my touring rims for Schrader and then used an adapter for my Presta tubes, so in an emergency, I can always borrow any 700c tube from a buddy or use a cheaper tube from the local non-LBS store. So your choice largely depends on your intended use.

Last edited by retroroadie; 07-31-11 at 02:21 PM. Reason: clarify statement
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Old 08-01-11, 07:56 AM   #9
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If you've ever pumped a Schraeder valved tube up to a decent pressure, then had the pump stick a bit when you took it off, leading to a 30-40 psi loss in the tire PLUS you get to pump it up again, and try to pull the pump off again, well, you know why Presta valves are so nice.
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Old 08-01-11, 12:18 PM   #10
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If you've ever pumped a Schraeder valved tube up to a decent pressure, then had the pump stick a bit when you took it off, leading to a 30-40 psi loss in the tire PLUS you get to pump it up again, and try to pull the pump off again, well, you know why Presta valves are so nice.
For me, this is the biggest reason. My floor pump is worn enough in the Schraeder valve part of the port that I can usually get it off quickly without sticking and losing pressure when pumping up my commuter bike tires. My Mountain Morph pump doesn't get much use, and is more likely to stick upon removal. Fortunately, that bike rarely flats so I rarely need the Mountain Morph pump.

I never run into this issue with the Presta valves on my road bike. This is good, as I've had to do a few tube replacements on the road and don't want to do a second pumping up of the tire while on the side of the road.
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Old 08-01-11, 09:54 PM   #11
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If you have presta and like schrader better get an adapter for the presta -- good to have in case you need air and no presta pump around.
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Old 08-01-11, 10:16 PM   #12
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Back in the day, the "Presta to Schraeder" adapter piece threaded nicely onto the end of the quick release skewer. Installing it in this way prevented one from forgetting to bring it along on a ride. More modern skewers may not have enough of the threaded rod sticking through the Non lever side of the skewer. YMMV.
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Old 08-01-11, 10:39 PM   #13
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The single most important feature of Presta valves is that they're thinner. That means smaller holes in rims, but more importantly better clearance better clearance between the inner surface of the tire beads on narrow rims. Some rim and tire combinations would be impossible with a Shrader valve.

The second advantage of Presta valves is that they are simple check valves, so it isn't necessary to use a thumblock pin to keep the valve open during pumping, and no air is lost when the pump is pulled off.

OTOH Shrader valves are easier to fill from compressors like at gas stations, though adapters make PVs just about equally easy to fill this way.

As far as ability to hold pressure, and most other considerations they're equal. So it boils down to whether you have rims narrow enough to dictate PV, or if not, whether you prefer to pump by hand or use a compressor.
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Old 08-01-11, 10:42 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elcraft View Post
Back in the day, the "Presta to Schraeder" adapter piece threaded nicely onto the end of the quick release skewer. Installing it in this way prevented one from forgetting to bring it along on a ride. More modern skewers may not have enough of the threaded rod sticking through the Non lever side of the skewer. YMMV.
Maybe the biggest drawback of clipless pedals is that there's no toe clip screw to stow my Presta adapter on. On one of my road bikes I use the FD bolt, but most are cut too short for this, so it's getting damm hard to find a secure place to keep one these days.
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Old 08-02-11, 09:41 AM   #15
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Just use the rear valve?
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Old 08-02-11, 11:55 AM   #16
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Just use the rear valve?
I ride tubulars and it's dangerous to have anything on the valve in case you roll a tire, or it comes unglued when you get a flat. In that event you need the valve to slide out of the rim easily, otherwise it'll hold the tire, wrap it around the axle and make a bad situation that much worse.

I've never rolled a tire, or had one come off the rim, but I'm certain that Murphy's Law holds and if I ever put anything on my valves, I will.

This isn't a concern for those who ride wired-ons (clinchers) however, so they can leave adapters on either or both valves, unless fashion concerns preclude that.
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