Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Junior Member JLTinsley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Misery, Missouri
    Posts
    23
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Help with disc brake conversion?

    So I want to convert this bike, which currently is a single speed with a coaster brake, to a bike with an internal gear hub (7 or 8 speed) and disc brakes. Here are the specs:

    Frame: HandCrafted 4130 Chromoly Steel and 1x H2O boss, Rear rack mounts, rear fender mounts
    Fork: Dura Forte Chromoly Unicrown with Fender Mounts, 1" threaded steerer
    Stem: Aluminum alloy Threaded, 1" quill
    Handlebar: Aluminum alloy Comfort Swept-back
    Derailleurs: n/a
    Shifters: n/a
    Brakes: Rear Coaster Brake (pedal backwards for braking)
    Hubs Front: Aluminum ALLOY SILVER NUTTED
    R/HUB: SHIMANO COASTER CBE110
    Rims: DA17, Aluminum ALLOY SILVER, 700c with 36 holes
    14G STAINLESS Spokes W/BRASS NIPPLES
    Crank LSC 44T Chainring, 170MM Aluminum ALLOY SILVER Arms
    Cartridge Bearing Bottom bracket
    Tires: Kenda 700x32C BLACK wall

    And because pictures sometimes help:



    My question is, what all will I need to do to convert this bike to disc brakes? I could deal with just the front being disc and the back being either a drum brake or rim, if the rear conversion would prove really difficult/expensive, but would prefer both front and back being disc.

    What I think I know so far is: For the front, I will need a disc compatible fork (with a 1" threaded steerer??), disc compatible hub, and of course, the brake components themselves. However, I don't think 1" threaded steerer forks for disc exist (I can't find any, anyway) so what would I need to do to make this work? But a new stem, headset, what size, etc?

    For the back, I thought I just needed a disc compatible hub (I was going to get the Sturmey Archer internal 8 speed) and the brake system. However, seeing something on the interwebz made me think I might need disc brake tabs on the rear dropouts/seat-stay/chain-stay intersection too. Is that true? Will it even be possible to use disc brakes on the back without being exorbitantly expensive? If it would be a huge hassle and cost me an arm and a leg, I'll just do a drum or rim brake in the back...so how would I convert from a coaster brake to that?

    Thank you all for your help!

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    25,268
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The cost of the conversion will be prohibitive.

    A new fork, a new front hub, the brakes themselves and new levers at an absolute minimum for front brakes only and that assums you can find a threaded fork with mounting tabs. More likely you will need a new threadless fork, headset, stem, hub and brakes and levers just to have a front brake.

    Your rear stays aren't going to be rigid enough to properly support mounting tabs but they could be welded on if you insist. Of course a repaint will be needed to cover the heat damaged area. I believe there are clamp-on tab but i have no idea if they work. Then add the cost of the new disc compatible rear wheel with the IGH, the brakes themselves, etc.

    By the time you are done, you will have spent much more than the cost of a decent complete bike already equipped the way you want. Either buy a properly equipped bike and keep this one as a second bike or sell it to help finance the right bike.

  3. #3
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    39,040
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks for supplying the picture..
    +1, above.. The frame lacks the required disc brake caliper mounts.
    you should go shopping for a bike that does.

    Or instead, consider the re building the wheels around Drum Brake hubs.

    Sturmey Archer offers a nice 3 and 5 speed drum brake hub ,
    Sram offers a drum 7 speed.

    Because of the ratios internally, a Sturmey 8 speed, needs a tiny chainring
    with a larger wheel.

  4. #4
    Junior Member JLTinsley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Misery, Missouri
    Posts
    23
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hmm. Ok. Seems like it would just create too much trouble. In that case, what would I need to do to put cantilever brakes on front and rear? I see a little screw on the top of the fork...is that a place to mount a rim brake?

  5. #5
    Senior Member Kayce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    St Louis
    Posts
    1,844
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Cantis would be the same problems, only much harder to find a fork. They require posts on the fork and seat stays to mount. The hole in the fork is to mount the fender on, and it may be able to be used for mounting a standard rim brake. But with the fenders it may be hard to fit one.

  6. #6
    Senior Member clasher's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Kitchener, ONT
    Posts
    1,501
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Canits would be just as much work as disc brakes. If it needs to be this frame and an IGH I think drum brakes are the only reasonable way to go about it. I imagine long reach caliper brakes would work on this bike if you want to improve the braking.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    25,268
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You may be able to mount caliper brakes if you can find ones with the proper "reach". The hole in the fork crown can be used to mount the front one and there should be a similar hole in the brake bridge in the seat stays above the rear wheel. This would be, by far, the cheapest and least damaging option.

  8. #8
    Junior Member JLTinsley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Misery, Missouri
    Posts
    23
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thank you guys for all your help! I think I'll just do a caliper brake in front (I've found some long reach ones that should do the trick) and either get an IGH with a drum brake or do a caliper in the back as well (you can't see it well from the small picture, but there is another hole on the seat stay, like @HillRider said; here is a larger pic to see it better: http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/..._pink_2100.jpg).

    My question then is, would you guys recommend the drum brake or caliper more? The drum provides the advantage of all-weather braking, no worries about rain and sludge and the like; however, I think repairs and maintenance would be more of a hassle...what is your opinion? Drum or caliper in the rear?

  9. #9
    I don't know. RB1-luvr's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Meriden, CT
    My Bikes
    '90 Bridgestone RB-1 , '89 SuperGo Access Comp, 2009 Access, 2010 Windsor Touring, 2014 Ritchey Road Logic, 2009 Kestrel Evoke SRAM Rival, 2003 Trek OCLV USPS livery, 1936 Westfield Seminole, 1946 Monark, '47 Western Flyer
    Posts
    1,034
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    if you end up selling that wheelset, I would buy them from you. I convert bikes to single speeds, and I frequently need coaster brake 700c wheelsets .
    Rast ich so rost ich. (When I rest, I rust)

  10. #10
    Junior Member JLTinsley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Misery, Missouri
    Posts
    23
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    @RB1-luvr If I do I'll definitely let you know!

  11. #11
    I don't know. RB1-luvr's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Meriden, CT
    My Bikes
    '90 Bridgestone RB-1 , '89 SuperGo Access Comp, 2009 Access, 2010 Windsor Touring, 2014 Ritchey Road Logic, 2009 Kestrel Evoke SRAM Rival, 2003 Trek OCLV USPS livery, 1936 Westfield Seminole, 1946 Monark, '47 Western Flyer
    Posts
    1,034
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    cool, thanks.
    Rast ich so rost ich. (When I rest, I rust)

  12. #12
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    39,040
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    what would I need to do to put cantilever brakes on front and rear? I see a little screw on the top of the fork...is that a place to mount a rim brake?
    for BMX there are bolt on adapters that include the Bosses that could mount a brake ,
    of that type.. V or cantilever, But..

    But I agree finding a suitable caliper brake will be much more straightforward.

    benefit of Drum brakes is that they stop the same in any weather.

    A rim brake pad has to get thru the wet on the rim, & dry it,
    to get enough friction.
    wheel rim rolls down to the wet street again, with every rotation.

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    25,268
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    benefit of Drum brakes is that they stop the same in any weather.
    Correct. however, the down side is cost, weight and more complex wheel removal and replacement for flat repair (just like a coaster brake or IGH).

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •