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Thread: Fuji upgrade

  1. #1
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    Fuji upgrade

    I have a 2009 Fuji Crosstown 1.0 and am slowly turning it into more of an upright position road bike. My question is will a Fuji FC-770 carbon fork fit this Altair 1 frame that's on this bike? The frame is a large (19"). I think it will, but don't know if it will require any mods to the fork (cut to a different length, etc.) Also wanted to know if the existing stem and head tube will work with that carbon fork or if I need to change those out too.

  2. #2
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    I'll begin by saying that if your goal is an upright positioned road bike, I'd highly suggest simply buying that bike rather than trying to transform a bike built for an entirely different purpose into a road bike. While you can end up with something that looks like a road bike in the end, the geometry of the bike may leave a lot to be desired, you'll have spent a considerable amount of money getting there, and you'll have dismantled a perfectly good bike to get there.

    So with that said, I'll attempt to answer your questions.

    First, your current fork is a threaded fork, apparently 1 1/8" in diameter. It is also a suspension fork and your frame is designed around that. While you could install a 1 1/8" threadless road fork doing so would require a new headset and a new stem and the result would be a much lower front end to your bike. The issue is the axle to crown distance of your current fork and a road fork. They are going to be quite different with road forks generally around 370mm. In order to find out how much difference there would be, you'll need to figure out your current axle to crown height, probably in the 430-450mm range (measure with someone sitting on the bike to account for fork sag).

    Once you have that dimension, you can begin searching for a suspension corrected fork for your bike. A quick search turned up this option which will likely only impart a slight geometry change but it isn't carbon fiber: http://www.bikepartsexpress.com/mm5/...content=FK0086

    It's also threadless which means you are still going to need a new headset and stem. If you really wanted carbon fiber you are likely out of luck unless you want to vastly change your geometry. There are carbon fiber cross forks with axle to crown lengths slightly under 400mm or 29er rigid carbon fibers at ~470mm. I personally wouldn't use either.

    Good luck trying to find a 1 1/8" threaded 700c suspension-corrected fork. 1 1/8" threaded is the least common of any fork design. It's tough enough to find 1" threaded forks these days.

    Hope this helps.

  3. #3
    Constant tinkerer FastJake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joejack951 View Post
    I'll begin by saying that if your goal is an upright positioned road bike, I'd highly suggest simply buying that bike rather than trying to transform a bike built for an entirely different purpose into a road bike. While you can end up with something that looks like a road bike in the end, the geometry of the bike may leave a lot to be desired, you'll have spent a considerable amount of money getting there, and you'll have dismantled a perfectly good bike to get there.
    +1

    Are you planning to put drop bars on this thing? I've gone down the "I'll convert this to a MTB" or "I'll convert this to a road bike" path before and it's NEVER worth it. I always end up disappointed with my creation and end up getting rid of it for a loss or converting it back to what it originally was.

    By the time you buy that carbon fork, stem, drop bars, and new brake levers and shifters (you'll really blow the budget with STIs!) you could've had a really nice used road bike. That doesn't even cover the compatibility issues you might run into with your new parts.
    Why "derailer" is the correct way to spell the gear-change mechanism: sheldonbrown.com/derailer.html

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