Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 08-26-11, 08:03 AM   #1
1989Pre
Standard Member
Thread Starter
 
1989Pre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Brunswick, Maine
Bikes: 1956 F. H. Grubb, 1989 Raleigh Technium road bike (all components upgraded), 2001 Raleigh M80 (all components upgraded)
Posts: 1,158
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 54 Post(s)
126mm Skewer in Ti

Does anybody offer (or offered in the past) a titanium, 126mm skewer for road bike?
All I am seeing is steel in this length. I know that I can use a 130mm, and KCNC has some nice ones, but I'd like to get the right size and not have to cut the extra length off. I'm actually looking for a set, 126+100mm

Paul
1989Pre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-11, 08:31 AM   #2
HillRider 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Bikes: '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
Posts: 28,844
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 66 Post(s)
By the time boutique skewers hit the market, 130 mm hubs were the norm so all the Ti and similar skewers I've ever seen were offered in 130 mm but were threaded far enough to let you use them on 126 mm hubs and cut off the extra length (or leave it in place if you preferred the "Ben Hur" look).

BTW, I trust you are going to use these on a frame with vertical dropouts. Those external cam skewers don't have the clamping force needed to reliably hold the rear wheel in position in horizontal dropouts.
HillRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-11, 01:33 PM   #3
JohnDThompson 
Old fart
 
JohnDThompson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Appleton WI
Bikes: Several, mostly not name brands.
Posts: 16,439
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 88 Post(s)
Zeus made a proper, enclosed cam quick release with titanium end caps and a steel shaft, but they went belly-up about 20 years ago...

JohnDThompson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-11, 05:33 PM   #4
HillRider 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Bikes: '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
Posts: 28,844
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 66 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
Zeus made a proper, enclosed cam quick release with titanium end caps and a steel shaft, but they went belly-up about 20 years ago...

Wow, I never saw one of those. However, I took it that the OP was asking about Ti shafts (some with Al end caps too) and those are relatively new. I have a pair of Specialized branded Ti/Al skewers I got from Performance a few years ago and they were very light but that was their only attraction. They now decorate my parts box.
HillRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-11, 01:42 PM   #5
1989Pre
Standard Member
Thread Starter
 
1989Pre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Brunswick, Maine
Bikes: 1956 F. H. Grubb, 1989 Raleigh Technium road bike (all components upgraded), 2001 Raleigh M80 (all components upgraded)
Posts: 1,158
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 54 Post(s)
Just curious, John: What did those Zeus' weigh in at? I can imagine that they would weigh 3 or 4 oz less than the standard, chromo variety.

Paul





Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
Zeus made a proper, enclosed cam quick release with titanium end caps and a steel shaft, but they went belly-up about 20 years ago...

1989Pre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-11, 05:39 PM   #6
FastJake
Constant tinkerer
 
FastJake's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Bikes:
Posts: 7,574
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
BTW, I trust you are going to use these on a frame with vertical dropouts. Those external cam skewers don't have the clamping force needed to reliably hold the rear wheel in position in horizontal dropouts.
I'm quoting this simply because it deserves repeating.
FastJake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-11, 01:00 AM   #7
dabac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 5,407
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by FastJake View Post
I'm quoting this simply because it deserves repeating.
But in this case it'd be a tight race between the external cam and the extra elasticity of Ti as compared to steel as being the biggest concern...
dabac is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-11, 01:31 PM   #8
1989Pre
Standard Member
Thread Starter
 
1989Pre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Brunswick, Maine
Bikes: 1956 F. H. Grubb, 1989 Raleigh Technium road bike (all components upgraded), 2001 Raleigh M80 (all components upgraded)
Posts: 1,158
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 54 Post(s)
My 1989 Technium does not have vertical dropouts. They are horizontal. Does this mean I can not use Ti skewers? This is the first time I had considered trying Ti, because I just had new wheels built for the bike. External cam? I had not even heard of it. Are you saying that a rear wheel could thrust forward upon heavy pedaling pressure? Thanks in advance.

Paul
1989Pre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-11, 06:24 PM   #9
HillRider 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Bikes: '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
Posts: 28,844
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 66 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1989Pre View Post
My 1989 Technium does not have vertical dropouts. They are horizontal. Does this mean I can not use Ti skewers? This is the first time I had considered trying Ti, because I just had new wheels built for the bike. External cam? I had not even heard of it. Are you saying that a rear wheel could thrust forward upon heavy pedaling pressure?
Thanks in advance.
Paul
Yes, that's exactly what we are saying. Horizontal dropouts do not play well with Ti skewer rods and particularly those with external cam qr's. Most boutique and untralight skewer sets do have external cams. Here is an illustration of an external cam skewer: http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...Qr+Skewer.aspx Enlarge the picture and look at the end with the clamping lever.

The standard Shimano/Campy-style internal cam type with steel rods are THE way to go. Also, a steel end nut or one with a serrated steel insert should be used to be sure the nut gets a good "bite" on the dropout face. Here is a typical internal cam skewer: http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...0+Skewers.aspx This is what you need.
HillRider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-11, 07:34 PM   #10
FastJake
Constant tinkerer
 
FastJake's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Bikes:
Posts: 7,574
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Yes, that's exactly what we are saying. Horizontal dropouts do not play well with Ti skewer rods and particularly those with external cam qr's. Most boutique and untralight skewer sets do have external cams. Here is an illustration of an external cam skewer: http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...Qr+Skewer.aspx Enlarge the picture and look at the end with the clamping lever.

The standard Shimano/Campy-style internal cam type with steel rods are THE way to go. Also, a steel end nut or one with a serrated steel insert should be used to be sure the nut gets a good "bite" on the dropout face. Here is a typical internal cam skewer: http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...0+Skewers.aspx This is what you need.
+1

The rear skewer of a horizontal dropout bike is not the place to save a few grams. It will slip at the worst possible time (when you're hammering on it) and you could easily hurt yourself. Save the extra weight elsewhere. Maybe a new frame? Judging by the amount of money you appear to be sticking into this build.
FastJake is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-11, 01:46 PM   #11
1989Pre
Standard Member
Thread Starter
 
1989Pre's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Brunswick, Maine
Bikes: 1956 F. H. Grubb, 1989 Raleigh Technium road bike (all components upgraded), 2001 Raleigh M80 (all components upgraded)
Posts: 1,158
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 54 Post(s)
Thank you all for saving me some heartache and buttache. Boy, I am sure glad you people warned me.
On the other hand, I do not see any functional difference between those two different types of skewers, Hill. I'll make sure I ask and research before buying, though.

Paul











Quote:
Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Yes, that's exactly what we are saying. Horizontal dropouts do not play well with Ti skewer rods and particularly those with external cam qr's. Most boutique and untralight skewer sets do have external cams. Here is an illustration of an external cam skewer: http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...Qr+Skewer.aspx Enlarge the picture and look at the end with the clamping lever.

The standard Shimano/Campy-style internal cam type with steel rods are THE way to go. Also, a steel end nut or one with a serrated steel insert should be used to be sure the nut gets a good "bite" on the dropout face. Here is a typical internal cam skewer: http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...0+Skewers.aspx This is what you need.
1989Pre is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-11, 04:25 PM   #12
Drew Eckhardt
Senior Member
 
Drew Eckhardt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Sunnyvale, CA USA
Bikes:
Posts: 5,091
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 42 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1989Pre View Post
[SIZE=3][B][FONT=Times New Roman][COLOR=darkred]Thank you all for saving me some heartache and buttache. Boy, I am sure glad you people warned me.
On the other hand, I do not see any functional difference between those two different types of skewers, Hill. I'll make sure I ask and research before buying, though.
The external cam surface has a larger diameter than the internal so that friction from closing the lever acts on a longer moment arm.

IOW, for a given force applied to the lever more is used to overcome friction in the open-cam design and less to clamp the wheel.
Drew Eckhardt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-11, 10:41 PM   #13
FastJake
Constant tinkerer
 
FastJake's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Bikes:
Posts: 7,574
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1989Pre View Post
On the other hand, I do not see any functional difference between those two different types of skewers
Check this out: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/skewers.html
FastJake is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:52 AM.