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  1. #1
    Brown Bear, Sqrl Hunter Jaytron's Avatar
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    First build at home, specialty tools needed?

    Hi all,

    I'm moving all my components from a 2009 Scott Speedster S40 Triple to a Nashbar frame (Crashed the Scott ) what kind of special tools do I need? I have the basic allens/sockets/etc. From what I understand, I'll need the following:

    Some kind of BB tool, I know it's a 20 tooth square taper
    A chain tool to install a new chain

    Is that it? Also, what parts do I need to apply grease to when installing? Obvious one would be the BB, but what about things like the RD mounting screw, or things like that?

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    Jaytron, I'd suggest a cable/housing cutter also. If it's threaded, grease it.

    Brad

  3. #3
    Brown Bear, Sqrl Hunter Jaytron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bradtx View Post
    Jaytron, I'd suggest a cable/housing cutter also. If it's threaded, grease it.

    Brad
    Are regular wire cutters not a good idea?

    Thanks for the grease tip, I should probably take my RD off and grease that. :x Is there a general rule on how much to tighten certain components?

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    Senior Member mechBgon's Avatar
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    I suggest scoping out Park Tool's how-to info: http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help It covers how to do stuff, and what tools you'll need.

    Some areas to look at: does your new frame use the same type headset, the same size of front derailleur clamp, the same brake reach, and the same seatpost diameter.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Retro Grouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaytron View Post
    Are regular wire cutters not a good idea?

    Thanks for the grease tip, I should probably take my RD off and grease that. :x Is there a general rule on how much to tighten certain components?
    Couple of work-arounds.

    The right amount of torque for bottom brackets is important or your bike will make funny noises. The torque spec is usually around 30 or 35 lb/ft. If you don't have a torque wrench, imagine a 30 pound weight hanging off the end of a foot long wrench. Tighten your bottom bracket that much.

    Make sure that your cable housings are cut nice and square. If you cut your shift housing at an angle, it will self-shorten. Then every couple of weeks you'll have to continually readjust your derailleur until you figure it out and fix it. If you use ordinary side cutters you'll have to dress up the cut with a bench grinder or a file and use an awl or sharpened spoke to make the housing round again.

    Ordinary wire cutters will probably make your cables fray. I always use slick galvanized cables because they solder easily. Solder the cable before you cut it and cut through the soldered termination and it won't fray. If you use stainless cables, you'll have to use silver solder to get this trick to work.

    If you decide to buy yourself a cable cutter, pay the extra money to get a good one. I've been using Shimano cable cutters for over a decade with good results. There's nothing more frustrating than a cable cutter that cuts all but one cable strand.

  6. #6
    Senior Member MudPie's Avatar
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    Toolwise (I'm mentally going thru my tool box):

    Bottom Bracket Tool (if you have pic or model, we can suggest proper tool)
    Chain Tool (needed to shorten new chain. And needed to reinstall pin, if not using a masterlink type chain)
    Cable and Housing Cutters (already mentioned, makes clean cuts)
    Crank Extractor (maybe, depending on type of crank, post pic or model)
    Headset wrenches (probably not since you probably have thread-less head set).
    Pedal wrench (probably not if you are transferring crank with pedal, but good to have for the future)
    Cassette lockring removal tool (probably not if you are using the old wheelset, but good to have for the future).
    Last edited by MudPie; 08-28-11 at 04:54 PM. Reason: Added cassette lockring removal tool

  7. #7
    Brown Bear, Sqrl Hunter Jaytron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
    I suggest scoping out Park Tool's how-to info: http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help It covers how to do stuff, and what tools you'll need.

    Some areas to look at: does your new frame use the same type headset, the same size of front derailleur clamp, the same brake reach, and the same seatpost diameter.
    Headset is the same type, but I do need to get a new FR clamp. Seatpost dia is different, but I was able to source a used one from a friend. I'm not sure what you mean by brake reach though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Retro Grouch View Post
    Couple of work-arounds.

    The right amount of torque for bottom brackets is important or your bike will make funny noises. The torque spec is usually around 30 or 35 lb/ft. If you don't have a torque wrench, imagine a 30 pound weight hanging off the end of a foot long wrench. Tighten your bottom bracket that much.

    Make sure that your cable housings are cut nice and square. If you cut your shift housing at an angle, it will self-shorten. Then every couple of weeks you'll have to continually readjust your derailleur until you figure it out and fix it. If you use ordinary side cutters you'll have to dress up the cut with a bench grinder or a file and use an awl or sharpened spoke to make the housing round again.

    Ordinary wire cutters will probably make your cables fray. I always use slick galvanized cables because they solder easily. Solder the cable before you cut it and cut through the soldered termination and it won't fray. If you use stainless cables, you'll have to use silver solder to get this trick to work.

    If you decide to buy yourself a cable cutter, pay the extra money to get a good one. I've been using Shimano cable cutters for over a decade with good results. There's nothing more frustrating than a cable cutter that cuts all but one cable strand.
    Sounds good, I'll invest in a good cutter then. I don't have a soldering iron though.

    Quote Originally Posted by MudPie View Post
    Toolwise (I'm mentally going thru my tool box):

    Bottom Bracket Tool (if you have pic or model, we can suggest proper tool)
    Chain Tool (needed to shorten new chain. And needed to reinstall pin, if not using a masterlink type chain)
    Cable and Housing Cutters (already mentioned, makes clean cuts)
    Crank Extractor (maybe, depending on type of crank, post pic or model)
    Headset wrenches (probably not since you probably have thread-less head set).
    Pedal wrench (probably not if you are transferring crank with pedal, but good to have for the future)
    Cassette lockring removal tool (probably not if you are using the old wheelset, but good to have for the future).
    Crank Extractor- I have these off already, because I had a shop remove the crank set. May be a stupid question, but do I need them again for install?

    Pedal wrench- 15mm open ended wrench good enough?

    Cassete tool- I am planning to reuse the wheelset, but I definitely will have this on my list of things to get.

  8. #8
    Senior Member mechBgon's Avatar
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    Regarding brake reach: many bikes take "short-reach" brake calipers, but some frames and forks are designed for a longer-reach caliper that'll accomodate fatter tires and/or mid-sized tires plus fenders. You may be fine, just plug your rear wheel into your new frame and confirm that the brake pads can reach the rim's brake surface as intended.

  9. #9
    Senior Member MudPie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaytron View Post

    Crank Extractor- I have these off already, because I had a shop remove the crank set. May be a stupid question, but do I need them again for install?

    Pedal wrench- 15mm open ended wrench good enough?

    Cassete tool- I am planning to reuse the wheelset, but I definitely will have this on my list of things to get.

    The crank extractor is only to remove the crank. Depending on the type of crankset, you might just need 8mm Allen Hex bit to reinstall crank. Note, there is probably a torque spec, to tighten ~30 fl-lb. See if you can borrow a torque wrench (and a 8mm hex bit) for this.

    A standard 15mm open ended wrench may not fit the flats on the pedal (widthwise), and probably not enough leverage to remove pedals.

    Cassette tool is fairly low-cost, ~$6.

  10. #10
    Senior Member MudPie's Avatar
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    Also, if you get a cassette tool now, you can remove the cassette and clean it up. Nothing like a shiny cassette!

    Which brings up another point, if the old cassette has many miles, and you are installing a new chain, you might want to put on a new cassette to match the chain. If the old chain was "stretched", the old cassette wore to the elongated chain. Thus when you put a new chain on, it won't mesh properly with the old cassette.

  11. #11
    Senior Member cyclist2000's Avatar
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    Headset Press
    I don't do vintage, I bought them new, rode them, kept them. Now they are just old bikes
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/bustercrb/sets/72157623483647522/

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    the money you spend on tools is money you could spend to have the lbs do it so keep that in mind. if you really don't wrench much, let them do it. but if you tend to tinker a lot, go ahead and get the tools

  13. #13
    Brown Bear, Sqrl Hunter Jaytron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
    Regarding brake reach: many bikes take "short-reach" brake calipers, but some frames and forks are designed for a longer-reach caliper that'll accomodate fatter tires and/or mid-sized tires plus fenders. You may be fine, just plug your rear wheel into your new frame and confirm that the brake pads can reach the rim's brake surface as intended.
    Will do, thanks for the explanation.

    EDIT: Just checked, seems to be fine

    Quote Originally Posted by MudPie View Post
    The crank extractor is only to remove the crank. Depending on the type of crankset, you might just need 8mm Allen Hex bit to reinstall crank. Note, there is probably a torque spec, to tighten ~30 fl-lb. See if you can borrow a torque wrench (and a 8mm hex bit) for this.

    A standard 15mm open ended wrench may not fit the flats on the pedal (widthwise), and probably not enough leverage to remove pedals.

    Cassette tool is fairly low-cost, ~$6.
    I'm sure I have an 8mm Allen hex in my toolbox.

    I'll probably have to pick up a pedal wrench though

    Quote Originally Posted by MudPie View Post
    Also, if you get a cassette tool now, you can remove the cassette and clean it up. Nothing like a shiny cassette!

    Which brings up another point, if the old cassette has many miles, and you are installing a new chain, you might want to put on a new cassette to match the chain. If the old chain was "stretched", the old cassette wore to the elongated chain. Thus when you put a new chain on, it won't mesh properly with the old cassette.
    Ah ok. Is there any way of checking cassette wear?

    Quote Originally Posted by cyclist2000 View Post
    Headset Press
    From what I've read, this isn't needed for an integrated headset. Do I still need one?

    Quote Originally Posted by motobecane69 View Post
    the money you spend on tools is money you could spend to have the lbs do it so keep that in mind. if you really don't wrench much, let them do it. but if you tend to tinker a lot, go ahead and get the tools
    Yeah, I'd rather spend money on tools so I can do the maintenance myself. I like wrenching on things, I worked on cars for most of my younger years
    Last edited by Jaytron; 08-29-11 at 12:51 AM.

  14. #14
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    The headset installation is at best a hassle with just a hammer and a block of wood. And at worst a huge, blasted pain if you don't have a tight-fitting driver to set the crown race. And may even turn to be impossible if you're using a new fork but hoping to reuse your old headset and need to retrieve the crown race from the old fork.

    In short, it may be better get a shop to at least take care of the headset. Otherwise, my advice to you is to take the needed time to work up facsimile of a headset press and lower race driver before embarking on the assembly. Unfortunately, buying these tools from Park quickly blows the budget on most amateur builds which I can think of. And my experience has been that without the appropriate tools you'll experience feelings ranging from rage to despair, trying to get that lower race from an old fork onto a new one.

  15. #15
    Brown Bear, Sqrl Hunter Jaytron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plimogz View Post
    The headset installation is at best a hassle with just a hammer and a block of wood. And at worst a huge, blasted pain if you don't have a tight-fitting driver to set the crown race. And may even turn to be impossible if you're using a new fork but hoping to reuse your old headset and need to retrieve the crown race from the old fork.

    In short, it may be better get a shop to at least take care of the headset. Otherwise, my advice to you is to take the needed time to work up facsimile of a headset press and lower race driver before embarking on the assembly. Unfortunately, buying these tools from Park quickly blows the budget on most amateur builds which I can think of. And my experience has been that without the appropriate tools you'll experience feelings ranging from rage to despair, trying to get that lower race from an old fork onto a new one.
    I will likely buy a new crown race.

    So, a headset press is required for integrated headsets? I read this on park-tool's website: " The inside bevel acts as the bearing "cup". Cartridge bearing are used which drop directly into the headtube as a slip fit. There is no pressing involved." what part of the installation will need a press? Either way, I'll have to take it in to cut the fork anyways, but I'd just like to know for future reference.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaytron View Post
    I will likely buy a new crown race.

    So, a headset press is required for integrated headsets? I read this on park-tool's website: " The inside bevel acts as the bearing "cup". Cartridge bearing are used which drop directly into the headtube as a slip fit. There is no pressing involved." what part of the installation will need a press? Either way, I'll have to take it in to cut the fork anyways, but I'd just like to know for future reference.
    You won't need a headset press for the installation however you will need a star nut installation tool. if you don't get that star nut installed just right it can really be a pain in the ass. I would let the lbs do this for you, I wouldn't be surprised if they didn't even charge you for it as it is quick and easy with the right tool

  17. #17
    spathfinder34089 spathfinder3408's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaytron View Post
    Are regular wire cutters not a good idea?

    Thanks for the grease tip, I should probably take my RD off and grease that. :x Is there a general rule on how much to tighten certain components?
    Tin Snips at the hardware work on cutting bike cables clean. The housing can be cut with a hack saw and make sure the inside of the housing is clean and smooth with a small file.

  18. #18
    Brown Bear, Sqrl Hunter Jaytron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by motobecane69 View Post
    You won't need a headset press for the installation however you will need a star nut installation tool. if you don't get that star nut installed just right it can really be a pain in the ass. I would let the lbs do this for you, I wouldn't be surprised if they didn't even charge you for it as it is quick and easy with the right tool
    Yeah, I saw that. I may have the shop do it, because I need them to cut my fork correctly as well. I think they do $30 for a fork install, but I believe that includes headset as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by spathfinder3408 View Post
    Tin Snips at the hardware work on cutting bike cables clean. The housing can be cut with a hack saw and make sure the inside of the housing is clean and smooth with a small file.
    Sounds good thanks!

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    Rolling along fas2c's Avatar
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  20. #20
    Brown Bear, Sqrl Hunter Jaytron's Avatar
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    Got this far today:



    Still need to buy a FD clamp, cables and then it's on to the cockpit.

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