Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    4,328
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Spoke tension - follow instructions or traditions? NoTubes ZTR Olympic

    Hi guys,

    I'm just doing the final tensioning on a set of wheels built of Notubes ZTR Olympic rims, and I'm pondering the spoke tension. NoTubes website recommend something like 85 kg as max spoke tension, which is quite a ways from the general recommendation of 110 kg.

    So what to do? Follow the specific instructions, or the true-and-tested general recommendation? Has anybody built on these rims, and can share some experience on whatever tension you used?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    boston, ma
    Posts
    2,834
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    these are light rims i wouldn't take em over 100kg prob 85-90 for the front and 100 for rear. dt spoke freeze or similar when you are done if you really want

  3. #3
    Senior Member mechBgon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    6,957
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Also re-check tension after your first several rides.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Rochelle, NY
    My Bikes
    too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
    Posts
    22,042
    Mentioned
    60 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    A basic rule for everything is that the specific trumps the general.

    The rim maker is no doubt aware of common practice, he's also aware of the strength of his rims, so I would listen to the one most likely to know.
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,281
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Of course, a rim that won't take 1000 N in spoke tension is likely to be junk.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Rochelle, NY
    My Bikes
    too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
    Posts
    22,042
    Mentioned
    60 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by dscheidt View Post
    Of course, a rim that won't take 1000 N in spoke tension is likely to be junk.
    Are you calling my Fiamme Yellow label, Mavic AR7, Weinmann Weltmeister, Super Champ Arc en Ciel, and other lightweight rims Junk?

    Get over it.

    The 100kg+ figure is fine for rims that can take it, but when building 32h or more is overkill and limits you to rims to be heavier than necessary. Unfortunately it's taken on a kind of gospel and it's hard to find decent light rims anymore.

    IMO anybody can build a decent wheel with heavy rims and 14g spokes. The challenge is to build equally good, but lighter wheels with light rims and 2.0/1.7, 1.8/1.6 or even 1.8/1.5 spokes.
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    4,328
    Mentioned
    3 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Well, it's been an educational build. Spoke tensions this low, and maybe this particular hub, I got very visible spoke tension differences depending on whether it's a heads-in or heads-out spoke. Took something like two extra turns on the NDS heads-out spokes to compensate for that. Maybe one full turn on the DS spokes. Never had that so clearly before.
    On the good side though, even with DT Rev, there wasn't much of spoke wind-up to talk about.
    I've used DT prolock nipples on the drive side and brake side front, alloys and Loctite blue on the NDS/NBS. Can't wait for the tires to arrive so I can get a ride in. These wheels are light.

    Two things about these rims: Nipple holes are drilled entirely perpendicular to the wheel axle, so there's no "left or "right" to deal with there.
    ERD is given the Mavic way, to the surface that supports the nipple flange. I added 2 mm to that and got the sweetest, most perfect bottom-of-slot alignment in many a build.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •