Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-05-11, 04:17 PM   #1
mm718
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 610
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
First Tire Change Attempt

Hi, I am newbie and not terribly mechanically inclined so please bear with me. I attempted my first tire change today and was puzzled when the tube was much longer than the circumference of the wheel. I watched a youtube video "how to change a tire" and this didn't seem to be an issue. My wheels are 700x25 and the tube is "700x20/28 thin." What am I missing?

While I have you here--I got this flat after only 60 miles on my new bike... I originally wanted puncture resistant tires but the LBS sales guy said they were heavy and that I probably didn't need them. I know I need to learn to change a tire but I'd really like to do it as infrequently as possible. Are puncture resistant tires really that heavy? I am wondering what you guys think of Michelin Krylion Carbon Road Tires?

Thanks in advance for any help,

-Mike
mm718 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-11, 06:57 AM   #2
mikezs
Noob
 
mikezs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Essex, UK
Bikes: Specialized Rockhopper Expert Disc 2009, Giant Boulder 510 Sports 1999, Olympic Competitor 1978
Posts: 71
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Length of tube doesn't really matter. They're made to suite a bunch of thicknesses and a couple of different circumferences (I use 700C tubes on my 27x1 1/4 wheels).

If you're looking for a lightweight setup, puncture resistant (I've got Continental gator skins) tyres do weight a bit more, but a high quality inner tube at the correct pressure is more important in my opinion. If they're regular punctures (more than every 200ish miles), then you may want to do for the puncture resistant ones.

Welcome, and good luck with future repairs

Edit: my first post too! Spent a while lurking
mikezs is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-11, 07:19 AM   #3
w98seeng
Senior Member
 
w98seeng's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Incognito
Bikes:
Posts: 392
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mm718 View Post
Are puncture resistant tires really that heavy?
I would guess that the difference between a 'regular' tire and a puncture resistant tire is probably about 4oz. - 6oz. (or less) for the two.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mm718 View Post
I am wondering what you guys think of Michelin Krylion Carbon Road Tires?
I have no experience with these tires, but doing a search on Google shows that most people like these tires and say they get 3,000 to 5,000 miles of riding on them with good puncture resistance.

You can also go with tubeless wheels. http://www.notubes.com/

Ian
w98seeng is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-11, 01:23 PM   #4
mm718
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 610
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Thanks, Mike! The tube looked like it was much too big both uninflated and slightly inflated but this morning I put even less air in and it fit perfectly. After breaking a presta valve and cursing this while presta/schrader thing I finally got the tire changed but of course I have no idea how much air is in the tire since a regular tire gauge won't work and I don't have a presta floor pump. So one small victory down next I have to get that rear wheel on!

I checked out the tires you suggested and they look really great. My budget is tight now but I may start with one rear tire...

Thanks for the welcome!
mm718 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-11, 01:57 PM   #5
w98seeng
Senior Member
 
w98seeng's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Incognito
Bikes:
Posts: 392
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't know if this is how you do it, but maybe this will help, it works for me.

1) slightly inflate the tube, only enough to barely hold it's shape.
2) Insert the tube into the tire.
3) Insert the valve stem into the rim and one side of the tire.
4) once the first side of the tire is on, start on the second side, starting at the valve stem and work around the rim.

Ian
w98seeng is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-11, 02:31 PM   #6
mm718
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 610
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Thanks, Ian. That's pretty much the method I used, following the directions of a youtube video. I thought I should inflate the tire with my Versair Mini Pump as practice for a roadside change. The valve didn't fit in the pump easily and somehow I bent it and then broke it trying to straighten it out. I have a video for putting the rear wheel on but any tips are welcomed.

Your estimate of the increased weight of the puncture resistant tires is consistent with what I've read elsewhere. I'll take the trade off of a few extra ounces for decreased flats. Given the long wear of better puncture resistant tires and the fact that I won't have to buy as many tubes it seems almost less expensive in the long run to invest a little more up front.

What's the consensus on tubeless?
mm718 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-11, 03:36 PM   #7
gyozadude
Senior Member
 
gyozadude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Sunnyvale, California
Bikes: Bridgestone RB-1, 600, T700, MB-6 w/ Dirt Drops, MB-Zip, Bianchi Limited, Nashbar Hounder
Posts: 1,180
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Some more tips:

For about $1, you should be able to buy a small brass presta to schrader converter. Has an o-ring at the base to seal against the presta valve, and allows one to use a schrader pump. I carry a few spares all the time in my kit and it helps folks with presta valves to pump up with conventional car equipment when they're in a pinch. I usually buy them in bulk to give away. (search for "presta to schrader adapter"). Probably cheapest at your LBS.

As for going with puncture resistant tires, I've tried a few, and in general, they reduce considerably puncture flats. But it's not zero. Flat fixing is still a great skill to have. And even though I've had plenty of shop experience, I'm still pretty stoked when I'm able to fix someone's flat in just a few minutes on the road and get them through a ride - especially when that someone is myself.
gyozadude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-11, 04:24 PM   #8
mm718
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 610
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I just ordered a floor pump that automatically adapts to Presta or Schrader, Gator Skin tires, and earlier today I picked up a Presta/Schrader adapter for just the purpose you mentioned, Gyozadude. I'll also get more practice with tire changing putting the Gator Skins on, which will hopefully make me feel more confident. Thanks everyone for your tips!
mm718 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-11, 05:30 PM   #9
waldowales
Old Fogy
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Murray, Utah
Bikes:
Posts: 1,224
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You shouldn't be buying many tubes, no matter how many flats you have. Learn to patch them and re-use them.
waldowales is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-11, 06:17 PM   #10
dscheidt
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Bikes:
Posts: 1,373
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mm718 View Post
I just ordered a floor pump that automatically adapts to Presta or Schrader, Gator Skin tires, and earlier today I picked up a Presta/Schrader adapter for just the purpose you mentioned, Gyozadude. I'll also get more practice with tire changing putting the Gator Skins on, which will hopefully make me feel more confident. Thanks everyone for your tips!
put one on one (or both) of your wheels. Hard to lose that way (unless you live in a very sketchy town). And they weight about 5 grams, so not exactly a weight issue outside of racing.
dscheidt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-11, 10:01 AM   #11
mm718
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Bikes:
Posts: 610
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
OK, got the wheel back on but I have a quick question...

Is there a way for me to check my tire pressure while I am waiting for my pump to ship? If I put on the presta/schrader adapter could I get a reading from the gas station gauge (on the air compressor)?

Thank, waldowales that's next on my list. Will do, dscheidt. Gotta get some sort of use out of those things!
mm718 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:29 AM.