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Thread: Frame bending

  1. #1
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    Frame bending

    I recently had to ship my 1976 Raleigh Superbe from Canada though US Customs.

    As I was reassembling it I could not get the rear wheel on and then I realized that the right side frame fork was bent in about 1 to 1 1/4". The bend begins about 4 or 5 inches posterior to the seat down tube. The wheels were off as I had to ship it through in disassembled in a bike box.

    I have thought about a cold bend using the method descibed on the Sheldon Brown web site and doing it myself.I am not a mechanic though. I have also thought of sending it to a bike shop or possibly even a motorcycle frame shop where it can be rebent in a vise.

    I like the bike alot. It is otherwise in mint condition. I just began to reride it after a 35 year hiatus. It has less than 100-125 mi on it. When it was put in storage in 1976 it had less than 50 miles on it and it looks like a new bike...not even a scratch on the inner side of the fenders!

    Any ideas will be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you.

    wgnovakmd

  2. #2
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    It's an easy job if you follow Sheldon Brown's instructions. Or you can bring it to any decent bike shop or co-op if there's one around.

    For future reference, drop in at a local shop and ask for front and rear transport spacers. Bikes and frames are shipped with these to prevent what happened to you. Shops throw dozens of these out every week so if you ask nicely they should be willing to give them to you. If uou can't get a pair, make your own by cutting a 3/4" wooden dowel rod to the right length (no great precision needed) and driving roofing nails into each end, trapping a washer under the head.
    FB
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    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

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  3. #3
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    +1,
    each bike shipped has a front block in the fork , the rear much less often,
    as the wheel is installed by the assembly facility and is part of prepare ing it,
    for padding and boxing.

  4. #4
    Insane Bicycle Mechanic Jeff Wills's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    It's an easy job if you follow Sheldon Brown's instructions. Or you can bring it to any decent bike shop or co-op if there's one around.

    For future reference, drop in at a local shop and ask for front and rear transport spacers. Bikes and frames are shipped with these to prevent what happened to you. Shops throw dozens of these out every week so if you ask nicely they should be willing to give them to you. If uou can't get a pair, make your own by cutting a 3/4" wooden dowel rod to the right length (no great precision needed) and driving roofing nails into each end, trapping a washer under the head.
    +2.

    I once bought a frame from a shop that had its rear triangle offset by about an inch. (Shipping damage.) I straightened it out and it rode fine until I sold it.
    Jeff Wills

    All my bikes.

  5. #5
    Senior Member JonathanGennick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    It's an easy job if you follow Sheldon Brown's instructions.
    If you follow his instructions, be aware that you probably do not need to stand with your full weight on the 2x4s. Don't ask me how I know that. Otherwise his method is clever and seemed to work quite well.

  6. #6
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    For those shipping bikes often, a set of reusable transport axles are easily made from defunct hubs. Remove the locknuts, cones and axles from both a front and rear hub and reassemble just the cones and locknuts on the bare axles at the proper spacing. Use your own hubs qr skewer or get a discarded pair to clamp them in place. Nutted axles also can be used but are less convenient.

    I made mine from a pair of hubs liberated from my LBS's scrap box and the total cost was zero.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by wgnovakmd View Post
    As I was reassembling it I could not get the rear wheel on and then I realized that the right side frame fork was bent in about 1 to 1 1/4". wgnovakmd
    Are we talking 1 to 1 1/4 inches or cm?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbruening80 View Post
    Are we talking 1 to 1 1/4 inches or cm?
    I think it's fairly clear that he said 1-1/4", (" being the symbol for inches in the USA)
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  9. #9
    Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbruening80 View Post
    Are we talking 1 to 1 1/4 inches or cm?
    About 1 1/4 inches. Only one side is bent and the bend has an angular inward curvature to it that is visable.

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