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Thread: Peugeot parts

  1. #1
    Lover of Old Chrome Moly Myosmith's Avatar
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    Peugeot parts

    I found an old Peugeot road bike that fits me fairly well but a cycling friend warned me that older Peugeots used some parts that can be hard to find/replace. I wish I had taken the time to snap some photos or get more information, but I didn't want to draw attention to the bike because I think I can get it quite inexpensively.

    Anyone familiar with older Peugeot road bikes and how difficult it is to find parts?

  2. #2
    slow as I ever was Ex Pres's Avatar
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    Not nearly enough information from your post to know. 70's Pugs were mostly French threaded, 80's had a mix of Swiss threads in there. By ~'83 you would have mostly modern standard threads. Are parts difficult to find? No, not with the internet, but finding cheap parts in a hurry can be.
    72 special CNC ______ 72 Frejus (ala Legnano) _73 Holdsworth Record
    80 Ranson__________ 80 unknown French____ 83 Trek 600 (620 styled)
    85 Gianni Motta_____ 90 Miele Gara ________ 02 Casati Dardo #1
    02 Casati Dardo #2 __ 03 Casati Dardo ______ 08 BF IRO (fixed/SS)
    09 Dogma FPX magn_ 10 Vassago Fisticuff (IGH)

    For Sale: _________ 78 Raleigh Professional __ 82 Peugeot PXN10
    85 Trek 560_______ 88 Guerciotti GLX

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    Can'tre Member 3alarmer's Avatar
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    ^^^^^^^^^^^^What he said^^^^^^^^^

    In addition, a lot of the older (read pre 80's) Peugeots
    came equipped with biodegradable plastic derailleurs
    which break pretty quickly under moderate use.

    The rear one requires some mechanical sophistication
    to replace so that your replacement works well.

    One picture is worth a thousand words.
    Quote Originally Posted by Terrierman View Post
    No wonder everybody hates you.

  4. #4
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    some had special tube diameters , metric , where most is only showing you a conversion
    to metric of a fractional size.
    for example: exclusive French, steering .. forks: 22.0mm. rather than 22.2mm, or 7/8"..
    so stems and headsets are unique.

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    I have an 85 Peugeot that has a quill seatpost. PITA to adjust and PITA to replace if it ever self destructs.

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    Lover of Old Chrome Moly Myosmith's Avatar
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    Thanks for the answers. I know I didn't give a lot of information. I'm guessing this bike to be from the late 70s or maybe early 80s. If I get another chance, I'll check it out further. Probably not the bike I'm looking for.

  7. #7
    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
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    Peugeot only made the frame. But the rest of the parts went through an evolution, from the cheap plastic derailleurs and odd french threading into the 1970s, then by 1980 to a mix of Swiss and French threading, until the mid 1980s, when they adopted the standard sizing used by most of the rest of the world. All of the french brands have this uniqueness. While parts are available, they sell at a hefty premium to the standard stuff (I can buy a cartridge bb for a vintage Japanese bike for $10, the French cartridge bb is $50, the Swiss is $150 last time I looked).

    While I have owned many french bikes from that era over the years (I have three right now), they are not without a few challenges. As long as you don't need replacement parts, its really not an issue.
    Last edited by wrk101; 09-27-11 at 06:14 PM.

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    Senior Member Grand Bois's Avatar
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    I've built four French road bikes. It wasn't very hard or very expensive. I knew next to nothing when I started ten years ago. Now I know alot and I can't stop. I'm always watching for high end French bikes and parts, even though I already have more than I need. Most of the parts came from Ebay. Prices have gone up, but you can still score French parts cheap if you're patient. The white PA10 was built with parts from the Black PX10. The Black PX10 is mostly 1970's Campagnolo Nuovo and Super Record. The Green Jeunet is my beater.





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    To the OP: By now you should have concluded that older (pre ~1990) French bikes are an arcane world of their own and, while experts who are familair with their their idiosyncrasies can keep them running at reasonable cost, it's not a field for the novice mechanic. Look elsewhere.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Grand Bois's Avatar
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    The big problem that people always bring up is finding French threaded bottom brackets and headsets. None of my bikes needed them those. Stronglight parts were so well made that they only needed fresh grease and bearing balls after 35 or so years. I've spent a lot of time looking for French parts because I'm looking for the really rare stuff like the Simplex Retrofriction bar end shifters, demultiplicator relay and Super LJ derailers on the Gitane. It took months to find those parts at a price I was willing to pay. Meanwhile I was riding the bike, just not with the shifters and derailers that I really wanted for it.

    Keeping them running at a reasonable cost? I think that the chromed Campagnolo Record triple crank on the Black PX10 is the most I've spent on a bike part at $200. How far will that much money go when you need parts for a decent new bike?

    We were all novices when we started. I say go for it.
    Last edited by Grand Bois; 09-27-11 at 09:36 PM.

  11. #11
    Lover of Old Chrome Moly Myosmith's Avatar
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    Thanks all. I'm looking for a quality basic road bike that I can do 90% of the maintenance and repair myself. I'll probably pass on the Peugeot.

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    we be rollin' hybridbkrdr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Myosmith View Post
    Thanks all. I'm looking for a quality basic road bike that I can do 90% of the maintenance and repair myself. I'll probably pass on the Peugeot.
    If you want to save money, some people are satisfied with Shimano 2200 or 2300 equipped road bikes. I think you have to look around though for the better prices. And MSRP prices can be higher than what you'll find in some stores, especially when they're on sale. This is a good time of the year to look for sales though.
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