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Old 10-11-11, 07:30 AM   #1
estabro
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DIY: How to Rebuild Shimano Pedals (Photo & Instruction Thread)

Shimano Pedal Overhaul

Application:

Many Shimano pedal models; pictured here are my 5 year old M-540's

Tools Needed (may vary based on pedal model):

17mm wrench (or Shimano locknut tool)
7mm wrench
10mm wrench
8mm Allen wrench (or 15mm pedal wrench)
Grease
De-greaser
Q-Tips
Toothpick
Rags

Time Needed:

About 1 Hour

Removal:

1. Loosen/remove axle locknut until pedal bod separated from spindle with 17mm wrench




2. Loosen bearing locknut from end of spindle with 7mm wrench




3. Loosen bearing pre-loan nut from spindle. CAUTION: do not lose any bearings!


4. Remove bearing race, bearings, and axle locknut. Remove rubber grommet from axle locknut. Clean all parts.

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Old 10-11-11, 07:31 AM   #2
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Reassembly:
1. Reinstall rubber grommet and slide axle locknut on spindle.

2. Put bearing race into position and screw bearing pre-load nut halfway.

3. The hard part… Add grease under race and using a toothpick with a dab of grease on the end, pick up and place bearings on outside end, one by one. Push race down so these bearings don’t slip out and then install the inner bearings.



4. IMPORTANT: Tighten bearing pre-load nut so there is correct tension. Clean spindle end and bearing locknut with alcohol, apply Blue Loctite and then tighten using the 7mm and 10mm wrenches simultaneously. Allow proper time for Loctite to cure before reassembly.



5. Add more grease and then tighten pedal body to axle locknut.

6. Reinstall pedals on bike.
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Old 10-11-11, 07:39 AM   #3
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Thanks for the tip about the order to reinstall bearings and keeping pedal mounted on the crank. I've just stripped my M515's down to every single part and was planning to do the bearings very soon.
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Old 10-11-11, 10:30 AM   #4
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I have Shimano PD-M515's on two bikes and the spindle/bearing assembly that threads into the body does not have a hex but a multi splined plastic head. Shimano sold a specific tool, TL-PD40, to remove them. It's just a plastic ring with mating splines inside and can be turned by hand. IIRC, it cost less than $5. Note that on the M515's the left pedal's spindle assembly is left-handed threaded just like the crank threads.
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Old 10-11-11, 10:37 AM   #5
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Awesome, thank you for this.
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Old 10-12-11, 02:46 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
I have Shimano PD-M515's on two bikes and the spindle/bearing assembly that threads into the body does not have a hex but a multi splined plastic head. Shimano sold a specific tool, TL-PD40, to remove them. It's just a plastic ring with mating splines inside and can be turned by hand. IIRC, it cost less than $5. Note that on the M515's the left pedal's spindle assembly is left-handed threaded just like the crank threads.
I got it for about $1.50 (0.89) from RoseBikes and had a 10 (~$16) voucher for them too! Can't imaging I'll use it more than once or twice, but I love to have a really wide range of tools!
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Old 10-12-11, 06:25 AM   #7
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I don't know how to take one apart on the bike. I don't see the need to disasemble the cartridge. Wipe it down and clean out the pedal housing, then pack the pedal housing with grease and screw the cartridge back forcing out the old grease.
http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-...pedal-overhaul
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Old 10-12-11, 06:56 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidad View Post
I don't know how to take one apart on the bike. I don't see the need to disasemble the cartridge. Wipe it down and clean out the pedal housing, then pack the pedal housing with grease and screw the cartridge back forcing out the old grease.
http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-...pedal-overhaul
That's pretty much what I do too. A superficial cleaning of the cartridge and then new grease in the housing to purge the old as the pedal is reassembled.
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Old 10-12-11, 07:51 AM   #9
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That's pretty much what I do too....
Me too. The minute i saw all those itty bitty bearings I understood why some just toss them and buy a new set.
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Old 10-12-11, 10:56 AM   #10
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Is this valid for very old models? I have a set of SPDs which I think may be from the late '90s. The bearings feel a bit rough, and I've ridden them in the rain a lot, so I'm wondering if I should overhaul them. If I do, will the innards be like the pedal above, or like a standard set of pedals? They have the steel cleat saddle (I think it's called that) attached to the pedal body with two screws, unlike the modern ones which don't have anything there.
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Old 10-12-11, 04:34 PM   #11
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nice. thanks.
my left A600 pedal is clicking -- need to overhaul it this week.
bookmarked.
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Old 10-13-11, 01:57 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Airburst View Post
Is this valid for very old models? I have a set of SPDs which I think may be from the late '90s. The bearings feel a bit rough, and I've ridden them in the rain a lot, so I'm wondering if I should overhaul them. If I do, will the innards be like the pedal above, or like a standard set of pedals? They have the steel cleat saddle (I think it's called that) attached to the pedal body with two screws, unlike the modern ones which don't have anything there.
Pic?
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Old 10-13-11, 04:08 PM   #13
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Pic?

I'll post them tomorrow, if I can find my camera.
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Old 10-14-11, 03:00 PM   #14
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Great stuff. I'm tentatively planning to tear about and clean/relube everything on my Bianchi this winter, so I will definitely give this a whirl.
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