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Old 10-16-11, 03:18 AM   #1
Airburst
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Hydraulic road levers?

I seem to recall hearing a few months ago that Shimano was planning to release hydraulic drop-bar brake levers, possibly with integrated shifters as well. It makes sense that they would be, seeing as disc brakes are now permitted for cyclocross. Firstly, has anyone else heard about this, or am I misremembering?

Secondly, if Shimano do start making hydraulic levers for 'cross, are hydraulic rim brakes for road bikes are likely to make a comeback? Hydraulic lines are probably lighter than steel cable housing, so there's a marketing opportunity for them among weight weenies if nothing else. What do people think?

I'm just curious here, as any hydraulic system is likely to be outside my price range.
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Old 10-16-11, 03:29 AM   #2
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There were a few mechanical to hydrauic converters at Eurobike this year http://www.bikeradar.com/news/articl...ing-off-31633/

Doubt you will see a comback of hydraulic rim brakes, what's point? Magura havn't made a replacement for the HS66 ever, and the hole point of current hydraulics it to use a disc seperate to the rim, so you don't have any issues associated with using the rim as a braking surface.

For price range, look at MTB discs and DI2, disc were very expenisve when they first came out, now them come on most bikes over 250, DI2 have halved in price with Ultegra, wait till it's at 105 level, and it may become very cheap.
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Old 10-16-11, 07:04 AM   #3
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the hole point of current hydraulics it to use a disc seperate to the rim, so you don't have any issues associated with using the rim as a braking surface.
No it's not; that's the point of a disc, whether it's cable or hydraulic.

The point of hydraulics is better modulation and efficiency.

Hydraulic rim brakes are a better thing than cable rim brakes. And rim brakes are good because they're light and simple and they work fine when you're not swimming in mud. Rims aren't likely to last forever whether you're braking on them or not.

Last edited by Kimmo; 10-16-11 at 07:08 AM.
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Old 10-16-11, 07:52 AM   #4
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No it's not; that's the point of a disc, whether it's cable or hydraulic.
er yes it is, the question was asking about disc and rim brakes, there are / have been two systems of hydraulic braking available on bikes, rim and disc, the rim system that the OP was asking about, has only been made by Magura (HS66), this is no longer manufactured, so all current hydraulic brake systems are by default disc. At no point was the question about cable operated disc bought up till you did.

The original post was specifically about dropbar brakes, as you can not get any dropbar hydraulic rim brakes, it makes your argument pointless as there are none currently commercailly available.
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Old 10-16-11, 08:11 AM   #5
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As to hydraulic rim brakes, I think their time has come and gone. As jimc101 noted, Magura made a failed attempt (at least from a sales standpoint) and no other manufacturer has followed their lead.

I can't believe any hydraulic system could be lighter than current cable operated ones when you factor in the need for two master and slave cylinders and the fluid itself along with the hoses and fittings. How can they be lighter and a few feet/meters of thin wire and hollow small diameter housing?
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Old 10-16-11, 08:40 AM   #6
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I was just looking at the Magura site and the make the HS11 and HS33 which are hydraulic rim brakes.

Magura Rim Brakes
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Old 10-16-11, 08:48 AM   #7
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I was just looking at the Magura site and the make the HS11 and HS33 which are hydraulic rim brakes.

Magura Rim Brakes
I see they are still in business but their models are intended for MTB and similar bikes with nothing intended for road bike use. Still, they are the only maker of any hydraulic rim brake and their sales must be very modest. I have never seen a set of them here in the US on any bike of any type.
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Old 10-16-11, 08:58 AM   #8
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I can't believe any hydraulic system could be lighter than current cable operated ones when you factor in the need for two master and slave cylinders and the fluid itself along with the hoses and fittings. How can they be lighter and a few feet/meters of thin wire and hollow small diameter housing?
I'm not sure how, on second thoughts, the cylinders would have to be pretty heavy. That said, looking at MTB hydraulic levers versus MTB cable ones, there certainly seems to be a lot less metal in the body of some of the hydraulic ones, but someone would have to look up weights of different systems to be sure.

How did the HS66 work? Was it a pair of pistons pushing the pads directly inwards, or was it some sort of linkage system?

Last edited by Airburst; 10-16-11 at 09:04 AM.
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Old 10-16-11, 10:31 AM   #9
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I really like my Magura HS33, they are a rim brake for V brake bosses.
though only offered in a straight bar lever type.. mine on figure 8 bend
Trekking bars , so no problems with that.

http://www.cyclofiend.com/working/20...clark1008.html

Quote:
How did the HS66 work? Was it a pair of pistons pushing the pads directly inwards,
or was it some sort of linkage system?
the latter.. fluid pressure spreads 2 pistons, a lever, type 1, a pivot for each squeezes the rim.
#77 was a number applied to some , they were for skinny tire race bikes .
22 and 33 are for wider rims and tires. normal bikes.

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I have never seen a set of them here in the US on any bike of any type.
So? i'm here , but you've never seen me.. either..

US, 99+% of brands are contract made in Asia, and put on a boat across the Pacific
so bikes built up with German components, In General, are uncommon ..

Last edited by fietsbob; 10-16-11 at 01:16 PM.
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Old 10-16-11, 10:45 AM   #10
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I'm just curious here, as any hydraulic system is likely to be outside my price range.
HS 33 .. about $ 230, USD, a dura ace brifter / caliper set is probably higher priced,
<C> super record carbon stuff assuredly is..
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Old 10-16-11, 11:45 AM   #11
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The main use of the HS33 is in Trials bikes, short MTBs in 26 or 24" wheels for extreme stunt riding involving falling off high things. Apparently braking control is hyper critical and rim brakes reduce spoke flex and are more direct and precise.

Hydraulic brakes are going to be most useful on Tandems with long cable runs, and possible heavy touring bikes. I know Magura have been used by tourers with no problems.

Last edited by MichaelW; 10-16-11 at 11:49 AM.
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Old 10-16-11, 01:02 PM   #12
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My old Cannondale hybrid came with hydraulic rim brakes. Mine don't have any linkage in them just two pistions pushing the pads against the rim.
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Old 10-16-11, 01:20 PM   #13
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Not just trials bikes .. given they are very reliable, lots of German touring bikes
and I've seen Cannondales for the European market shipping with them in the build list.

was showing a head shock Rohloff IGH bike with an EBB frame, and Tubus racks,
but customer was Europe/UK, not to be sold on the US, ever..
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Old 10-16-11, 01:33 PM   #14
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Not just trials bikes .. given they are very reliable, lots of German touring bikes
and I've seen Cannondales for the European market shipping with them in the build list.

was showing a head shock Rohloff IGH bike with an EBB frame, and Tubus racks,
but customer was Europe/UK, not to be sold on the US, ever..
But the European touring bikes generally built up with trekking bars rather than drop bars.
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