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  1. #1
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    Threaded Carbon forks - Worth looking into?

    I've recently started looking into upgrading my CrMo fork to a carbon fork on my Trek 1000. However, I'm wondering if it's an upgrade worth looking into, and if there's anything that I'd need to change.

    I looked into the Nashbar fork, as well as this one:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/120657984627...9#ht_895wt_907

    One thing that I'm a bit hazy on is the offset and what it's got to do with the trail of the bike. If I change out to a carbon fork, will this "trail" be greatly affect and will it be a bad thing?

  2. #2
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    No.

  3. #3
    Old fart JohnDThompson's Avatar
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    What's wrong with the current fork?

  4. #4
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    trdsupragt, Look in Sheldon Brown's stickies for a tutorial on trail. If your present fork is damaged or you're looking for an appearance change I don't think it's worth it.

    Brad

  5. #5
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    As long as you are thinking of changing the fork, consider going threadless. You will also need a new headset and stem but the choices are much wider than threaded carbon forks.

  6. #6
    Gluteus Enormus mmmdonuts's Avatar
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    Cheap carbon forks will not be an upgrade to the CrMo fork on your bike. I'm guessing you have 1" steer tube/headset. Good 1" carbon forks are hard to find, threaded or threadless.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mmmdonuts View Post
    Good 1" carbon forks are hard to find, threaded or threadless.
    True but threadless is easier.

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    Senior Member Looigi's Avatar
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    It what way would the new fork be an upgrade? What are you looking to improve?

  9. #9
    Constant tinkerer FastJake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    As long as you are thinking of changing the fork, consider going threadless. You will also need a new headset and stem but the choices are much wider than threaded carbon forks.
    +1

    Going threadless would make this change somewhat worthwhile if you get a decent fork. I was amazed at how a threadless carbon fork stiffened up the front end of my '84 610. BUT the only reason I did it was because I already had the fork and the original was bent.

    I wouldn't bother if there's nothing wrong with your current fork. It won't be worth the money once you buy the fork, headset, and stem. Getting a threaded carbon fork would save you the purchase of the headset and stem but will make almost no difference - you can only get so much out of a threaded system.
    Why "derailer" is the correct way to spell the gear-change mechanism: sheldonbrown.com/derailer.html

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    I have the Nashbar threaded fork on my bike. It is considerably lighter than the fork that was on there.

  11. #11
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FuryUs1 View Post
    I have the Nashbar threaded fork on my bike. It is considerably lighter than the fork that was on there.
    I did the same. Big improvement over the aluminum OEM fork. However, there was no geometry difference from my old fork.
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    It's mostly to shave off some weight, but if the consensus is that it's not worth looking into unless it's damaged, then I'll keep it.

    At the same time, it's also for a bit of vanity, as I wanted the straight blades over the curved blades =p. Guess I'm better off with a newer/better bike at this point.
    Last edited by trdsupragt; 11-20-11 at 01:26 PM.

  13. #13
    RIP Sonny RaleighSport's Avatar
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    I'm going to be ordering a CF threaded fork or two, however these are to replace bent forks not as an "upgrade" persay. The weight loss is minimal since you still have a steel steerer! Oh and I've been told that it's not the standard old headset, it's the 26.0 or whatever...
    "Seriously is what I want to be, so I put on spandex and show off my gear, my junk, my thing, yes my ding-a-ling."

  14. #14
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    True but threadless is easier.
    To find, or Fit?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
    To find, or Fit?
    To find. There are more choices out there.

  16. #16
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    Save your money until you're ready to upgrade the frame.

  17. #17
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    It's not that hard to measure the offset of a fork if you have it in hand. But the axle to crown length also matters and this measurement seems less often known or given. But these two factors might end up cancelling eachother out anyway, say if the new fork has less offset but is also shorter. Even if it's a change, it might be an improvement, and you'll probably notice pretty quickly if it's not.
    I've found some old threaded forks, some carbon, with too long steerers for me, and used them with an old threaded headset by filing/grinding out the threads of the upper cup so it will slide onto the unthreaded portion of the steerer. I then used a threadless stem, and if there are still threads in the right place on top, I'll cut the steerer to length and use the old top nut above the stem to tighten and adjust the headset before tightening the stem. You don't want the stem to be clamped onto too much of the threaded part of the steerer though, at least less than half I'd say if it's going to be more than a test ride.
    Obviously not the ideal setup, but something that can work if you're experimenting with forks on a budget and not sure what you want.
    I've been tempted by the nashbar fork, but there are some nice cheap used forks out there too and I think it's a worthwhile upgrade if you can find the right one to work with your existing parts.

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