Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Senior Member ScottieDog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    138
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Felt QX85 - Want to change my forks.

    Hi,

    Have a 2011 Felt QX85 with the following stock forks....

    Felt Alloy Unicrown Fork: 1 1/8th Cromo Steerer tube, Alloy Crown and Legs, Disc Brake Specific w/Fender eyelets.

    I am considering changing them to suspension forks, with lockout facility. Main reason being that I got a new MTB delivered for my wife today with suspension forks and I love them, first time I ever used them - Now sort of wishing I had bought the Felt QX90 which comes with the sus forks as standard - Anyway, I didnīt, and I really donīt fancy buying a new bike so fork upgrade is the only option for me.

    I have found these forks, which are very similar to the model which is actually on the QX90, but how can I be sure that these will be compatible ?

    Suntour NRX S RL Air 700c Forks
    http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/M...?ModelID=50758

    So. 1. How do I know they are compatible ?

    2. Do I have to change the "Headset Cups" ?

    I donīt mind looking at other makes of forks, loads of options by the seems of it at the bike shops, but need to know what is compatible, and what is not... if it is 700c, will it always be compatible for instance ? Any recommendations for forks, donīt mind spending up-to 250€, iīm sure thatīs enough given the bikes worth....

    Cheers all.

  2. #2
    Senior Member mechBgon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Posts
    6,957
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I had a look at a photo of your bike, and immediately noticed that it's not built with a longer fork in mind (this is called "suspension-corrected"). So if you add a suspension fork, and it has a longer axle-to-crown length (which it will), it's going to change the bike's handling noticably. Eyeballing the Suntour fork you linked to, it looks like the axle-to-crown dimension must be 100-120mm longer. That's a big change. Could it be installed? Yes. Would you like the result? Maybe not.

    Regarding headset cups, your bike appears to be using an integrated headset.

  3. #3
    Senior Member ScottieDog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    138
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    OK Thanks. gonna give it a miss based on that, will look to upgrade the whole bike next year then (even though its only a few months old - LOL). See how I go.

    Cheers.


    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
    I had a look at a photo of your bike, and immediately noticed that it's not built with a longer fork in mind (this is called "suspension-corrected"). So if you add a suspension fork, and it has a longer axle-to-crown length (which it will), it's going to change the bike's handling noticably. Eyeballing the Suntour fork you linked to, it looks like the axle-to-crown dimension must be 100-120mm longer. That's a big change. Could it be installed? Yes. Would you like the result? Maybe not.

    Regarding headset cups, your bike appears to be using an integrated headset.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    River City, OR
    Posts
    572
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'd give it some time if I were you. It sounds as if you're somewhat new to cycling. Personally I find a suspension fork on a pavement bike a PITA if not somewhat of a danger. They "wallow" in high speed turns. They rise and bounce around when climbing or starting from a stop, and dive when braking. A solid frontend is much more stable and safer- and a whole bunch lighter.

  5. #5
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    My Bikes
    CCM Torino 76
    Posts
    937
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Suspension is great if you are on very rough trails, but I personally have never seen the need for them on any streets or roads, or paved paths regardless of conditions. Almost as effective, but much simpler and cheaper, is to get a fatter tire on the front.

    Also, many less-expensive susp. forks are pretty poor and don't actually offer too much in the way of added comfort or control. Bike manufacturers iclude them on a lot of hybrid and city bikes because it is a feature that many people are looking for but don't realize offer little benefit.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •