Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    42
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    I'm new to bike maintenance... any tips for a newbie? Best tools? Flipping bikes?

    Hey all,

    I'm kinda just posting this open ended question cause I really don't know much about bike maintanence and am open to any/all advice for someone new to bicycle maintenance. Also, as a broke, young person, with no bachelors and few job prostpects, any income is warmly welcomes, so "flipping" bikes is something I'd be interested in; as gas gets more expensive and the apacolypse looms ever nearer it seems, bike maintenance may be a very important skill.

    I recently began to upgrade/maintain my old 80's Raleigh steel frame (my new bike, which required little of either was stolen). I converted it to single-speed (seems to be very popular right now), and learned a little about maintenance by tweaking the chain-tensioner, getting the right chain length, installing the front chain ring, etc.

    Anyway, I am just rambling now, but I have a chain tool, lock-ring removal tool, pedal and cone wrenches...

    Is bike maintanence a profitable endevour? I am not very mechanically inclined, but like working with my hands. I'd also be interested in painting bikes as part of flipping them. I'd be interested in any thoughts. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    425
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Best tools? No one company makes the "best" tools across the board. Company A makes the best chain tool, company B makes the best bottom bracket tool, company C has the best wrenches, etc. "Best" can also be very subjective once cost is factored in. Shoot, "best" is always subjective anyway.

    That is my thought on tools, bicycle specific or otherwise.

  3. #3
    I Biked Today Crazyed..27's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    My Place
    My Bikes
    1998 Lemond Zurich, Redline Conquest Pro, Kilo TT
    Posts
    252
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Do you work for Jimmy Johns??????

  4. #4
    Optically Corrected KLiNCK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    My Bikes
    2012 Specialized Sirrus , 2012 Specialized Roubaix Comp
    Posts
    104
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    First thing I would acquire is a bicycle stand.
    You can get a decent one for around $200 or a used one for a fraction of that.
    Lubing your chain, truing rims, adjusting brakes, cables, ...
    Makes preforming all maintenance tasks much easier - you'll wonder how you ever got along without one!
    "Succeeding....despite best intentions"

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    My Bikes
    2003 Lemond Zurich; 1987 Schwinn Tempo; 1968 PX10; 1978 PX10LE, Peugeot Course; A-D Vent Noir
    Posts
    428
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    How about getting a job in a local bike shop? Talk to LBS folks in your area and let them show you their workshops. This will give you some idea of the tools of the trade. Zinn & the Art of Road Bike Maintenance has introductory chapters that deacribe all the necessary tools. If you can land a job in a LBS, that's a great way to get on-the-job training, especially if you are serious about making a profession of bike repair.

  6. #6
    Senior Member zukahn1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Denver Co
    My Bikes
    Current 79 Nishiki Royal, Jeunet 620, 59 Crown Royal, notable previous bikes P.K. Ripper loop tail, Kawahara Laser Lite, Paramount Track full chrome, Raliegh Internatioanl, Motobecan Super Mirage.
    Posts
    4,064
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I wouldn't advise getting into flipping until you get some more experience. Even most of the veteran guys here have a hard time flipping bikes for decent profit. We do it because we like to or we come across that rare ultra great deal or a dumbster bike that just begs to to be saved. You can figure putting in 10's of hours on even an easy flip when you figure in the time of spent finding the bike getting the needed parts cheap or free. If you can't get the parts cheap or free ie you have deep parts bins boxes and conections where live to get parts your in trouble buying new retail parts just kills any chance of profit.Plus the time spent fixing and cleaning up the bike plus the time spent listing and showing the bike in the end your lucky if you make more than a few bucks an hour for your time.
    Last edited by zukahn1; 12-05-11 at 08:07 PM.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    42
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Crazyed..27 View Post
    Do you work for Jimmy Johns??????
    Yes I do. And yeah, I've found it hard to profit off bikes. I just lost $165 in a trade. I'm sure I'll learn basic maintenance through more experience. Thanks.

  8. #8
    Constant tinkerer FastJake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Madison, Wisconsin
    Posts
    6,020
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by FreakyFast View Post
    Yes I do. And yeah, I've found it hard to profit off bikes. I just lost $165 in a trade. I'm sure I'll learn basic maintenance through more experience. Thanks.
    Money can be made flipping, but it takes a while to learn what each bike is worth. After a few years of doing it you'll be able to glance at any bike and give it an approximate craigslist value. When buying bikes at yard sales or especially on craigslist you must pounce immediately on good deals to get them as there are usually a few flippers in every market - the people you have to beat.

    But I would not worry too much about that yet. IMO the best (and probably cheapest) way to get into bicycle mechanics is to buy very cheap but good name brand bicycles that need repair. Buy the tools you need along the way. I learned almost everything I know from www.sheldonbrown.com and the Park Tool website http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help
    Why "derailer" is the correct way to spell the gear-change mechanism: sheldonbrown.com/derailer.html

  9. #9
    Senior Member zukahn1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Denver Co
    My Bikes
    Current 79 Nishiki Royal, Jeunet 620, 59 Crown Royal, notable previous bikes P.K. Ripper loop tail, Kawahara Laser Lite, Paramount Track full chrome, Raliegh Internatioanl, Motobecan Super Mirage.
    Posts
    4,064
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Is there a bike coop collective near to where you live that you can voulenteer and get some skills. Plus connections to free cheap parts.
    http://communitycycles.org/links/bike-collectives.html
    Last edited by zukahn1; 12-06-11 at 01:35 AM.

  10. #10
    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    The NC Mountains
    My Bikes
    Too many to list, all vintage
    Posts
    18,828
    Mentioned
    25 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    +1 To this comment: "Money can be made flipping, but it takes a while to learn what each bike is worth. After a few years of doing it you'll be able to glance at any bike and give it an approximate craigslist value. When buying bikes at yard sales or especially on craigslist you must pounce immediately on good deals to get them as there are usually a few flippers in every market - the people you have to beat."


    Flipping is best done as a hobby, not a job. As a job, it sucks, you can make more mowing lawns, cleaning houses, painting, just about any odd job.

    If you want to start flipping anyway, flipping starts with knowing your market. What can you sell a nice, reconditioned bike for? You need to be able to glance at a bike, and in a couple of seconds, estimate what it is going to cost to fix, and what it will sell for. Deals on bikes don't last, there is no time to study. You have to grab now, study later. The good news, this is easier than I am making it sound. Bikes are pretty straight forward, its almost all out there to see.

    Then, the money is made WHEN you BUY the project bike. Buy right, you will always make money. Pay too much, and its really easy to lose money. I pass on a lot of bikes that are either priced too high, or have limited market potential. I almost always buy bikes that need work, often A LOT of work. Buyers want bikes that are pristine and ready to ride. Neglected bikes tend to sell for a discount. I love to see dirt, flat tires, rusty cables and chain. Those are easy fixes but are value killers.

    You have a choice on flipping, the DKO flippers (dirt knocker offers) who do nothing other than just wash the bike, and the full rehab route. The full rehab route which I have chosen takes a lot of tools, access to cheap parts, donor bikes, lots of room, repair skills, etc. The DKO route takes the ability to find bikes cheap, really cheap, as you are selling them where they still need work (at a steep discount to what they would sell for fully repaired). I buy bikes from the DKO crowd all of the time, bought two last week.

    My first couple of flips were the DKO variety. I did not have any tools (OK, I did have a spoke wrench), and lacked the repair skills anyway. The profits from those started funding tools, and I went on from there.

    Finding deals on bikes means looking all the time, and pouncing. The last three bikes I bought (all this week), cost $40, $12, and $40. All name brand, bike shop bikes. Obviously I had to move really quick, and turn over a few rocks, to find good bikes at those prices. The nice thing about buying bikes that low, its really hard to lose money. Even if I overlook some major defect, as a minimum, I can make my money back on just one or two parts.
    Last edited by wrk101; 12-06-11 at 06:25 AM.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    42
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    thanks all for the input- some valuable advice. I plan on ordering a 29'er frame and transferring the parts from my old 80's raleigh onto it for the experience. Some things probably won't transfer but that'll be a learning experience in itself.

    Do you guys ever have the frames of your project bikes re-painted? Or is a shine usually sufficient? Thanks.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    West Yorkshire, United Kingdom
    Posts
    2,959
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Would caution your plan of transferring parts from a bike from the '80 to a modern 29'er frame, as you will find few if any parts will be transferable.

    The Forks, Bottom bracket, crank, front deraileur, headset, stem, seatpost, rear hub / wheel will most likely not fit, the only things which will possibly transferable will be the front wheel, which you will have problems as almost all 29'er forks are disc only; this will also cause problems with using brakes from the '80's which will be caliper or canti's, and the rear deraileur which won't be compatible with modern drive systems, this will be the same for your shifters. You may end up with only the grips and saddle which make it from the old to new bike.

    You will find it cheaper to buy a complete bike, say a Motobecane from Bikes Direct, striping and re-building it, than buying the parts to complete your transfer as planned, which will end up being a complete new bike anyway.

    For re-painting an old bike, this has been covered recently, and the consensus was, that it wasn't worth it if you are going to be flipping it, just clean up what you have.

  13. #13
    Senior Member CACycling's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Oxnard, CA
    My Bikes
    '08 Fuji Roubaix RC; '07 Schwinn Le Tour GS; '92 Diamond Back Ascent EX
    Posts
    4,388
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I agree that a repair stand would be a great investment. I like the Park PCS10 at $135 as a good balance of quality, function and price. If you have a Performance Bike Store nearby, they often run their Spin Doctor house brand tools on sale and many of them are quite good.

  14. #14
    Constant tinkerer FastJake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Madison, Wisconsin
    Posts
    6,020
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by jimc101 View Post
    Would caution your plan of transferring parts from a bike from the '80 to a modern 29'er frame, as you will find few if any parts will be transferable.

    The Forks, Bottom bracket, crank, front deraileur, headset, stem, seatpost, rear hub / wheel will most likely not fit, the only things which will possibly transferable will be the front wheel, which you will have problems as almost all 29'er forks are disc only; this will also cause problems with using brakes from the '80's which will be caliper or canti's, and the rear deraileur which won't be compatible with modern drive systems, this will be the same for your shifters. You may end up with only the grips and saddle which make it from the old to new bike.
    +1

    Don't except to transfer anything to a 29er frame. The only thing besides that saddle that may transfer is the bars if you buy the correct stem.

    Realize that building a bike from a bare frame is the most expensive way to do it. A frame may seem cheap but once you add up all the parts you'll find you could've bought a nicer complete bike.
    Why "derailer" is the correct way to spell the gear-change mechanism: sheldonbrown.com/derailer.html

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    42
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks all.

  16. #16
    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    The NC Mountains
    My Bikes
    Too many to list, all vintage
    Posts
    18,828
    Mentioned
    25 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by FreakyFast View Post

    Do you guys ever have the frames of your project bikes re-painted? Or is a shine usually sufficient? Thanks.
    Easiest way to lose your butt on a flip is to repaint a bike. A quality paint job often will come close to or exceed the value of the finished product. A rattle can paint job is a lot of work, and can still be costly in supplies AND TIME. Instead, I seek out bikes with really crappy paint as donors, to get parts. A $10 or $20 donor bike can supply a lot of good parts, even if the frame is totally trashed. Picked up $5 Cannondale MTB recently, totally trashed, no wheels. But it had a nice set of derailleurs, seat post, good crankset and bb, handlebars and stem. I've already repurposed the crankset.

  17. #17
    Senior Member billnuke1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    the "Cape"
    My Bikes
    Almost hundreds!
    Posts
    445
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Flipping is not easy. If you get a bad reputation by half assing bikes you won't sell any more bikes. I sell a lot of bikes to the kids around here. No matter how well I rebuild these older bikes, they do come back! At some point what you have into the bike surpasses what you can get out of the bike with all good conscience. You might want to clean up the Raleigh for sale. Bikes like that can just be picked up and immdiately flipped to someone who is interested in restoring the bike themselves. I take whatever bikes I can get. If you have to take 3 bikes to get 1 good bike, then that is what you have to do. As you work on these bikes you will need parts. I have taken rear derailleurs off of bikes that are barely frames to fix a bike that a heavy handed kid has brought back 2 days after buying it! If you don't want to give him back his money and sell more bikes in your neighborhood you have to be able to fix that bike correctly and safely! And quickly! There is a lot that goes into flipping!

  18. #18
    Senior Member billnuke1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    the "Cape"
    My Bikes
    Almost hundreds!
    Posts
    445
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    In the end most of these guys ended up buying a good stand. I have used my bike carrier to work on bikes while camping. Again...buy a good one! I buy tools whenever I can. Surprisingly, every time I invest in tool, I find myself using it as soon as it comes in or soon afterwards! Ibought an inexpensive "home" tool kit to use as I invested in better tools down the road. They have worked out well and have shown me what I need and don't need for tools. Good Luck!

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    42
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'll probably be buying a stand very soon. Thanks.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •