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  1. #1
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    rear wheel keeps rubbing on the left side chain stay when I undo the QR

    exactly what the title says. Maybe it's normal but I've never noticed it before.

    I changed my tire yesterday went for a quick ride to the library and then I heard the tire rubbing on the left side chain stay (opposite the drive train). I flipped the bike upside down, undid the quick release, and saw that the wheel pulled to the left. I pulled the wheel back into the drop-outs all the way and the wheel was centered. I locked the quick release and rode back home. Later on in the night, I went for a longer ride and the same thing happened. Is this normal? Every time, I undo the quick release, the wheel pulls to the left.

    It's probably a really simple answer, but I've already tried doing everything to prevent it from happening. I even googled it. Someone help.

  2. #2
    AEO
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    it sounds like it is slipping inside the dropout, and needs to be secured tighter.
    Food for thought: if you aren't dead by 2050, you and your entire family will be within a few years from starvation. Now that is a cruel gift to leave for your offspring. ;)
    http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/arti...ger-photos.htm

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    No, it's not normal. Does your bike have horizontal dropouts where the wheel is pulled forward in the slots when you remove it? When you pedal, the chain tension on the right side of the bike tends to pull the rear wheel forward on that side and if the axle slips forward then the tire will start to rub against the left chainstay. But the quick release should be tight enough to prevent the axle from slipping.

    First make sure that the quick release is tight enough - it should take a pretty hard push on the lever to secure it. Second, verify that the axle isn't too long - if the end of the axle itself sticks out level with or even beyond the dropout then the quick release can't press against the dropout surface. Third, check on the type of quick release - some aftermarket types don't exert enough force or have the serrations to properly grip on horizontal dropouts. Shimano and Campy quick releases are generally better.

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    One common rule of thumb is that the q/r lever should leave a brief impression on your palm when tightened properly, but you should be OK if you just adjust it until even an out-of-the saddle start does not shift the wheel. Of course we are all assuming you know to use the q/r as a lever, not turn it as a wingnut!

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    Quote Originally Posted by prathmann View Post
    No, it's not normal. Does your bike have horizontal dropouts where the wheel is pulled forward in the slots when you remove it? When you pedal, the chain tension on the right side of the bike tends to pull the rear wheel forward on that side and if the axle slips forward then the tire will start to rub against the left chainstay. But the quick release should be tight enough to prevent the axle from slipping.

    First make sure that the quick release is tight enough - it should take a pretty hard push on the lever to secure it. Second, verify that the axle isn't too long - if the end of the axle itself sticks out level with or even beyond the dropout then the quick release can't press against the dropout surface. Third, check on the type of quick release - some aftermarket types don't exert enough force or have the serrations to properly grip on horizontal dropouts. Shimano and Campy quick releases are generally better.
    Yes, horizontal drop-outs on a Surly CC.
    I haven't touched the adjuster bolts on the drop-outs.
    The axle shouldn't be too long. The wheels are stock and I haven't overhauled the hub.
    The QR are Shimano.

    I'm gonna try tightening it the wingnut part, just a little more and see if that will keep it in place. It's only a problem if it pulls to the side while I'm riding. I can have the bike collective I'm part of give me a second opinion on Saturday. I just need it to stop coming loose while I ride.

  6. #6
    Asi
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    Many dropouts have limiting screws to position the wheel properly every time (push the wheel axle in the dropouts till you hits the limiting screws and tighten the QR)
    Make sure the limiting screw is set properly on the left side.

    If you have horizontal dropouts (track) and it's SSP or FG, then make sure you use the chain tensioner http://www.tokyofixedgear.com/produc...--Zinc-Plated/
    Or even if it's not a track horizontal dropout, might be a good time to put a universal tensioner that keeps the axle in that place, that works for horizontal frontward dropouts like many bikes have (not the track backward dropout)

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    Quote Originally Posted by AEO View Post
    it sounds like it is slipping inside the dropout, and needs to be secured tighter.
    That makes sense if it keeps loosening up when I ride. Hopefully, tightening it up will prevent that.

    I still don't understand why it pulls to the left when I have it flipped upside and use the quick release, though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Asi View Post
    Many dropouts have limiting screws to position the wheel properly every time (push the wheel axle in the dropouts till you hits the limiting screws and tighten the QR)
    Make sure the limiting screw is set properly on the left side.
    How do I know if the limiting scre is set properly? Should they be equal on both sides?

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    Some quick releases don't have a rough enough surface. Combine that with a smooth dropout and the QR can slip regardless of how tight you make. There are two fixes - get a different QR or use a washer with curled teeth.
    You're just trying to start an argument to show how smart you are.

  10. #10
    AEO
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    Quote Originally Posted by SurlyLaika View Post
    That makes sense if it keeps loosening up when I ride. Hopefully, tightening it up will prevent that.

    I still don't understand why it pulls to the left when I have it flipped upside and use the quick release, though.
    sometimes a groove can be worn into the dropout from the constant axle slippages, which will cause it to slip more often.
    Similar to a dislocated shoulder.
    Food for thought: if you aren't dead by 2050, you and your entire family will be within a few years from starvation. Now that is a cruel gift to leave for your offspring. ;)
    http://sanfrancisco.ibtimes.com/arti...ger-photos.htm

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    Asi
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    Quote Originally Posted by SurlyLaika View Post
    How do I know if the limiting scre is set properly? Should they be equal on both sides?
    It's pretty self-explanatory but here goes: I'm talking about this screws: http://www.webklik.nl/user_files/201...e_dropouts.jpg

    Basically you flip the bike up, put the rear wheel and do not tighten it at all. push it way back into the dropouts. Is it straight centered in the frame? If it's not, tighten the appropriate screw or loosen the screw (some dropouts have such a screw only on one side). Check by pushing the axle into the dropouts so it rests on the screws, if it's straight it's OK.

    Anyway, might take into consideration that your qr is too loose, too "slippery" (get one with serrated edge), and another thing to look for are the washers/nuts that come into contact with the dropout from "inside", and yet another thing you can do is moving that axle in the dropout (like tightening a few turns both limiting screws, align it so it's straight, but overall you moved the resting position by a few millimeters that should have other grip on the dropout)

    also i found this thread on a neighboring forum: http://forums.mtbr.com/redline/monoc...ge-512401.html
    Last edited by Asi; 01-19-12 at 06:37 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SurlyLaika View Post
    exactly what the title says. Maybe it's normal but I've never noticed it before.

    I changed my tire yesterday went for a quick ride to the library and then I heard the tire rubbing on the left side chain stay (opposite the drive train).
    Since it was fine for a long time, and the problem started when you removed the wheel, I suspect that's the defining issue.

    Odds are that it's a simple case of the skewer nut adjustment going off when you mounted the wheel. Open the QR, adjust the nut a bit tighter and close to feel if the tension is OK. Typically QRs make contact with the frame at about half way through the throw, then begin to apply compression during the second half of the throw.

    QR tension used to be set and forget with nuts that were a bit hard to turn on the skewer. However with the advent of lips of fork tops it became necessary to readjust them constantly, so they are now fairly free spinning and will often loose their adjustment when you rotate the skewer to your preferred orientation. If you prefer a set and forget approach, take the QR apart, put some rubber cement on the skewer thread, allow to dry then thread the nut on. Ideally it'll thread without much force, but be tight enough not to move until you move it.
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    You might also check to be sure that your QR mechanism is of the "closed" type. If you can see how it works it is the "open" type which tends not to clamp as tightly with the same amount of lever force. I always put Shimano skewers on new (to me) bikes which do not have them. The QR should also be adjusted so that you need to exert considerable force (more than thumb pressure) to close them. The lever should leave a mark on your palm when you close it if it is tight enough.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Asi View Post
    Many dropouts have limiting screws to position the wheel properly every time (push the wheel axle in the dropouts till you hits the limiting screws and tighten the QR)
    Make sure the limiting screw is set properly on the left side.
    When the wheel shifts to the left it is because the right side of the hub slides forward. The limit screws are just mounting guides - they have no effect on whether the wheel moves after mounting unless it is a rear facing dropout.

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