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Old 02-08-12, 07:41 PM   #1
Benjamin_E29
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Grind marks in the tubes

Howdy everyone. My friend has had this 1985? Peugeot P6 for a while that he's wanted to turn into a single speed commuter bike but recently gave up on it and turned the project over to me. He stripped down all the components a ground off the cable guides on the frame with what appears to be an angle grinder. I was cleaning up the areas that were roughed up by the grinding and it seems that he ground a bit deeper than the actual braze-ons and into the actual tubing of the frame. It's not that deep, I'd say they're less than 1mm into the tubing, but its definitely noticeable. I'm thinking of filling the marks with JB Weld for aesthetics but I'm wondering will these grind marks affect the integrity of the frame? It's made out of Carbolite 105 tubing which is Peugeot's in-house brand of tubing. Tubing diameter is fairly small, not super small though. Not sure on the thickness though. Any thoughts?
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Old 02-08-12, 08:10 PM   #2
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Probably not a structural issue -- carbolite is pretty thick tubing. If it bothers you, fill the gouges with lead or silver solder, file smooth, and repaint.

Why do people think they have to grind stuff off their frames, anyway? Just leave it alone, and save everybody some grief down the road...
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Old 02-08-12, 08:12 PM   #3
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Unless the cuts are in a critical area of a tension member, like under the downtube up near the head, I wouldn't sweat it. These frames are made of a relative ductile grade of steel and are considerably overbuilt by today's standards. If the cut is deep enough to cause a crack, it'll take some time, and propagate slowly giving you plenty of warning. Hopefully the fork is unaffected because there's much less (zero) safety margin if a fork should fail for any reason.

Even if it's in a critical tension area, I still wouldn't sweat, but I'd keep a closer eye on it.
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Old 02-08-12, 08:34 PM   #4
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Okay thanks guys. I'm going to fill em up with solder just so they dont show up under the new paint.

John I agree, I see no reason to remove the cable guides other than aesthetics. Damn kids and their fixed gears, GOD FORBID you run a rear brake...
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Old 02-08-12, 09:00 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin_E29 View Post
.he...ground off the cable guides on the frame with what appears to be an angle grinder. I was cleaning up the areas that were roughed up by the grinding and it seems that he ground a bit deeper than the actual braze-ons and into the actual tubing of the frame.
There's no problem with wanting to clean up a frame as a prelude to painting. However, nobody seems to do anything the easy way anymore. It's like a Tim Allen routine as they use powertool overkill to do something that could be done quickly, easily, acheaply and well with one of these.
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Old 02-08-12, 10:48 PM   #6
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Yup. I've dabbled in knifemaking before. A good sharp file will do anything a grinder will do with a whole lot less cussing.
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