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Old 02-12-12, 09:08 PM   #1
Standard Issue
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Do I need to re-dish?

I'm working on upgrading a 2x 7 speed steel bike to a 2x10. I'm using shimano da 7403 hubs with 130 spacing. The rear wheel fits into the dropouts just fine but the rim is off center. It's a bit closer to the non-drive side of the bike. The wheel is positioned correctly and straight and true, it just doesn't seem to be dished enough. The wheel is already dished to bring the rim closer to the drive side and I'm not sure how much more it can be dished.
Another wheel set I have which is a much newer but lower end 130 hub seems to be dished perfectly so the rim is centered in the frame. If both hubs are designed for 130 spaced frames, why would one be dished differently than the other and what kind of frame would the DA set work with as it is currently set up?
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Old 02-12-12, 09:28 PM   #2
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You don't dish a wheel to make it closer to one side or another...

You dish a wheel to make certain the rim is centered between the locknuts of the hub axle.

=8-)

Either use a dishing tool - or the flip flop method.

=8-)
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Old 02-12-12, 09:32 PM   #3
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You dish a wheel to make certain the rim is centered between the locknuts of the hub axle.
.. what he said ..
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Old 02-12-12, 09:36 PM   #4
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+1, wheels are always dished to be centered on the axle.

Question, did you respace or replace the wheel?

You can check the wheel by noting it's position then remounting with the cassette on the left. Be sure to get both ends of the axle fully to the top of the dropouts so it's consistent.

If the rim switches to the opposite side when you flip it, the wheel needs to be dished. If it stays in the same place, it's frame related.

There's other threads here about correctly dished wheels sitting to one side, read the descriptions and solutions there.
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Old 02-12-12, 09:39 PM   #5
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Then the problem must be that the rim is not centered between the locknuts but the wheel is otherwise straight and true. It's apparent the rim is pulled closer to the drive side just not quite enough.
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Old 02-12-12, 09:41 PM   #6
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Then the problem must be that the rim is not centered between the locknuts but the wheel is otherwise straight and true. It's apparent the rim is pulled closer to the drive side just not quite enough.
Is that an assumption, or did you test for it by flipping the wheel as suggested?
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Old 02-12-12, 09:59 PM   #7
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Is that an assumption, or did you test for it by flipping the wheel as suggested?
+1 Flip the wheel then see where it sits.
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Old 02-12-12, 10:42 PM   #8
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An assumption; your post wasn't up when I wrote mine. The rim on the other wheel set I have sits perfectly centered in this frame as well as another frame wiith the same 126 spacing.
I have a feeling the wheel just needs to be re-dished to center the rim between the lockunts. I'll take it to my lbs for confirmation and resolution.
I am confused, though, as to why the wheel is dished the way it is what type of frame it would fit properly.
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Old 02-12-12, 10:56 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Standard Issue View Post
A

I am confused, though, as to why the wheel is dished the way it is what type of frame it would fit properly.


You don't need the shop to confirm, the flip test is a positive confirmation, but you might need the shop to redish it.

As to why it's dished that way, it was probably an error, since wheels need to be built centered on the axle.

A few possibilities; someone added a spacer at one time and never re-dished, it was just built wrong (not as rare as you'd hope), someone aligned it at one time, and ended up moving it left, someone felt he needed to get better fight left tension balance and tried to do so, not thinking the rim would move that much.
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Old 02-12-12, 11:06 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Standard Issue View Post
An assumption; your post wasn't up when I wrote mine. The rim on the other wheel set I have sits perfectly centered in this frame as well as another frame wiith the same 126 spacing.
I have a feeling the wheel just needs to be re-dished to center the rim between the lockunts. I'll take it to my lbs for confirmation and resolution.
I am confused, though, as to why the wheel is dished the way it is what type of frame it would fit properly.
Without further info... you're doing 2 by 7 to 2 by 10? You're original DO space is 126? Rear wheel is two different animals. Reset the DO width properly and the "new wheel" will work if it's properly dished from the git-go.
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Old 02-12-12, 11:15 PM   #11
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I just did the flip test and it confirmed improper dish. I'll have the lbs check the axel installation to see if the problem lies there.
Thanks for your help.
AT
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Old 02-13-12, 02:36 AM   #12
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I bought a NEW though inexpensive MB wheel last summer and I had to move the dish 1/8" toward the drive side to center it.
I also deal with a lot of LOW end bikes I flip on CL and the vast majority are not dished enough in that direction.
It seems a lot of Huffy wheels were assembled by bottoming out the drive side spokes and snugging up the NDS to get it "true".
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