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Old 02-13-12, 11:21 PM   #1
sproyd
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Removing old Freewheel?

I'm currently in the process of stripping and rebuilding two bikes. The paint on the 1st one is curing so I'm busy working on the 2nd.

The bike is an old Giant TS-180 (no idea what year) but is a 5 speed and appears to be rocking some fairly old parts.

I am currently refurbishing the wheels. I managed to fairly easily take out and clean the front wheel bearings and cones and regrease/reassemble.

I am now working on the rear wheel. Couple issues.

(1) It is a Freewheel rather than a Freehub/Cassette arrangement and as you can see the wheel axle is an old-bolt setup rather than an axle with a hole for a skewer. This means my Shimano Lockring Tool which is similar to this one ain't gonna work as it can't go through the non-existent skewer holes.

(2) The bolt won't come out without removing the freewheel - is this normal? I've removed the non-drive side bearings, nuts etc, but the drive side seems to be jammed behind the freewheel - like the bearing cone is bigger than the freewheel hole.

Anyway looking for suggestions/experience on taking this thing apart/servicing. I assume I need one of these?


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Old 02-13-12, 11:45 PM   #2
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Second link you provided is the correct type of tool (for a freewheel), just make sure it's the correct one for your brand of freewheel. The tool should fit into the freewheel without having to remove the driveside locknut or cone as it is thin-walled.
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Old 02-13-12, 11:47 PM   #3
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I bet you need to put the tool designed for that freewheel into a vise, then flip the wheel over, place the pins in the tool into the holes on the freewheel then grab the rim/tires and crank that sucker off.

Also you wont' be able to take the axle out until you get the freewheel off. That appears to be noraml.
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Old 02-13-12, 11:50 PM   #4
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You need the appropriate freewheel tool. It should slide in there and grab hold.

Put the freewheel tool in a bench vise, tight.

Slide your wheel, cogs down, onto the freewheel tool. Turn your wheel like your opening a jar of pickles.

Your freewheel just came loose. Keep turning to remove it.

Now you have access to the nuts that will release the cones and bearings on the drive side.

You can't service a rear hub's bearings without taking off the freewheel. That's completely normal.
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Old 02-14-12, 12:04 AM   #5
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It is not a bolt it is a solid axle.

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Old 02-14-12, 12:09 AM   #6
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Why the hex? Is the axle two pieces and unscrews apart?
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Old 02-14-12, 12:12 AM   #7
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The hex? The hex nut is just the lock nut locking the cone in place. When you remove the freewheel, you will see the nut then spacer then the cone then the bearings.
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Old 02-14-12, 03:20 AM   #8
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cool thanks - better go shopping then.
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Old 02-14-12, 01:32 PM   #9
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like others above said, upside down in the vise. Best way I heard it explained, make like a bus driver making a big left turn!
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Old 02-15-12, 03:25 AM   #10
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Got it off like a piece of cake with a Park Tool FR-1. Spanner wouldn't fit on it and I dont' have a vise so I carefully applied locking pliers and just applied some force - popped off fairly easily.

Now I'm just furious realising I paid NZD25 for the stupid Park Tool thingee from LBS and I could have got it cheaper online.
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Old 02-15-12, 03:48 AM   #11
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When you put the freewheel back on, use the freewheel tool with your hands only; pedalling action will tighten the freewheel in use.
Grease the threads on the hub and be very careful about crossing the steel freewheel thread with the aluminium hub thread. I reverse the tool by hand until the threads click into place.
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Old 02-15-12, 07:40 AM   #12
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Some of these old beast freewheels, you CAN service the bearings without removing the freewheel. It IS a PITA!!! It isn't easy, a lot of needle-nose pliers, magnet tool and working with pinky finger to get things in out and clean. I don't have a tool for my old Schwinn with the Maillard-Normandy freewheel. Depends on just how the axle/cone/dustcap and such is laid out. SO many different builds on older bikes.
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Old 02-16-12, 09:28 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RubberLegs View Post
Some of these old beast freewheels, you CAN service the bearings without removing the freewheel. It IS a PITA!!! It isn't easy, a lot of needle-nose pliers, magnet tool and working with pinky finger to get things in out and clean. I don't have a tool for my old Schwinn with the Maillard-Normandy freewheel. Depends on just how the axle/cone/dustcap and such is laid out. SO many different builds on older bikes.
hhaha like you say probably not worth the hassle unless you don't have the tool to remove the FW
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Old 02-18-12, 05:35 PM   #14
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Taking freewheels apart is a "rainy day, can't do anything outside" kind of project. When I find old quality freewheels I usually tear them apart, clean, grease and oil, and reassemble. Then they gets tossed in my spare parts bin. When an old classic bike comes my way that has a rusted cogset, I dig thru the parts bin and see if I have something that fits.
I keep my eyes peeled at auctions and the newspaper. Sadly, the bad economy is causing bike shops to close, and the owners typically can't sell the tools prior to closing - only the tubes and tires seem to sell. I've found several of the older freewheel remover tools this way.
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