Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Senior Member 2bok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    69
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    seized lockring fix?

    When i started riding fixed gear i didnt know about greasing my threads so 2years later my lock ring is seized. Is the way that i can remove the lock ring with out striping the threads? thank you.

  2. #2
    Constant tinkerer FastJake's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Madison, Wisconsin
    Posts
    6,029
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Try PB Blaster, let it soak. I would think a lockring tool would be best for this job but you can always try the old hammer and screwdriver.

    If the cog is seized too, use the Rotafix method in reverse: http://204.73.203.34/fisso/eng/schpignone.htm
    Why "derailer" is the correct way to spell the gear-change mechanism: sheldonbrown.com/derailer.html

  3. #3
    Senior Member ljsense's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Madison, Wis.
    Posts
    133
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    If your lockring is steel and your hub threads are aluminum, pour ammonia all over it a few times and give it a chance to really soak. The fumes will punch you in face, so do it outside or somewhere ventilated. Ammonia attacks the bond that forms between steel and aluminum. PB blaster or other penetrating oils work with a steel/steel thread interface.

  4. #4
    Senior Member ljsense's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Madison, Wis.
    Posts
    133
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Also, heating will not be as useful as you might think because aluminum (the hub) expands more with heat than steel does.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Rochelle, NY
    My Bikes
    too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
    Posts
    18,200
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    I don't like to use screwdrivers as lockring punches because they're too sharp and tend to cut into the ring. I still have a specially dulled punch with a nice square edge I made decades ago for use on the track.

    Also don't try removing a tight lockring by beating away at a single notch. Rotate the wheel and try all the notches because the ring distorts, and by taking a shot at all the notches you increase the odds of using the flex to break the bonds all the way around. The same applies when setting it, tighten form 3 notches by degrees to make sure it's really tight.
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  6. #6
    Can'tre Member 3alarmer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    POSAW
    My Bikes
    Bicycles ? We don' need no steenkin' bicycles.
    Posts
    4,816
    Mentioned
    27 Post(s)
    Tagged
    3 Thread(s)
    PB Blaster it, let it sit for a while (15 minutes, maybe),
    remove both crank arms, put the whole bike up in a bench
    vise with soft jaws (copper or aluminum), the vise should
    be grasping the non drive side spindle taper.

    Take a hammer and drift (or a chisel, if you can throw away
    this lock ring and use a different one) and strike it forcefully
    and with great vigor with the drift in each of the notches
    as described by FB. You need to angle the drift so that your
    force goes tangential to the BB, not radial, in the counter
    clockwise direction.

    Curse if you need to.
    Quote Originally Posted by Al Dvorin
    Ladies and gentlemen, Elvis has left the building. Thank you and goodnight

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    24,845
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by 3alarmer View Post
    PB Blaster it, let it sit for a while (15 minutes, maybe), remove both crank arms, put the whole bike up in a bench vise with soft jaws (copper or aluminum), the vise should
    be grasping the non drive side spindle taper. Take a hammer and drift (or a chisel, if you can throw away this lock ring and use a different one) and strike it forcefully and with great vigor with the drift in each of the notches as described by FB. You need to angle the drift so that your force goes tangential to the BB, not radial, in the counter clockwise direction.

    Curse if you need to.
    Your description relates to a bottom bracket lockring removal. The OP said the bike is a fixie so I believe his problem is the lockring on the rear hub. Also, if it is the hub lockring, is he aware it's left hand threaded.

  8. #8
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    35,866
    Mentioned
    15 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    the Type of hook spanner for cup and cone BB adjusting cup lock-rings,
    is what you need to remove a track hub lock-ring..

    But, NB, the threading of the hub lock ring is LEFT Hand threaded ..

    might be same, [some BB tools ala Park, have 1 hook .. that should work.
    others have 3 pins .. like to better to engage lock ring,
    Ala Campag tool to lockrings being Campag parts

  9. #9
    Can'tre Member 3alarmer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    POSAW
    My Bikes
    Bicycles ? We don' need no steenkin' bicycles.
    Posts
    4,816
    Mentioned
    27 Post(s)
    Tagged
    3 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    Your description relates to a bottom bracket lockring removal.
    The OP said the bike is a fixie so I believe his problem is the lockring on the rear hub.

    Also, if it is the hub lockring, is he aware it's left hand threaded.
    Both excellent points, which I shall leave to the OP to clarify.
    Quote Originally Posted by Al Dvorin
    Ladies and gentlemen, Elvis has left the building. Thank you and goodnight

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Rochelle, NY
    My Bikes
    too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
    Posts
    18,200
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    The OP said the bike is a fixie so I believe his problem is the lockring on the rear hub. Also, if it is the hub lockring, is he aware it's left hand threaded.
    I also didn't bother reminding the OP that lockrings have left hand threads, but I'm starting to think that it's possible we're giving him too much credit. (no offense intended to the OP).

    He's been riding fixed for two years, and possible hasn't ever changed a sprocket. If a dealer installed the sprocket there's no reason for him to know or remember that the lockring is counter-threaded.

    To the OP, before you chisel the ring in two, check that you're driving it to the right, opposite to the way you'd remove a sprocket.
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  11. #11
    Senior Member 2bok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    69
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    i know its left hand thread since i installed it my self. I tried pb blaster it still failed can i heat it up with a heat gun and try or that would destroy the hub? fyi im using a homemade lock ring tool like this http://toolmonger.com/wp-content/upl...iers72-450.jpg and i have a formula lockring Should i just go out and buy the proper tool? thank you

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Rochelle, NY
    My Bikes
    too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
    Posts
    18,200
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by 2bok View Post
    i know its left hand thread since i installed it my self. I tried pb blaster it still failed can i heat it up with a heat gun and try or that would destroy the hub? fyi im using a homemade lock ring tool like this http://toolmonger.com/wp-content/upl...iers72-450.jpg and i have a formula lockring Should i just go out and buy the proper tool? thank you
    That's a decent tool for the job, but it has a drawback. As you work harder, you tend to squeeze the lockring, which makes it harder to turn. Try using some touch, holding the tool only tight enough that it doesn't slip off.

    You might also try using it to flex the ring, Squeeze the ring hard to flex the ring back and forth by switching notches.

    BTW- In my experience, impact does a better job separating frozen parts, so you might want to give the chisel a shot. Since you're good with the grinder, shape the end of the chisel to meet the notch when it's set almost at a tangent.
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Captain Blight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Minneapolis
    My Bikes
    -1973 Motobecane Mirage -197? Velosolex L'Etoile -'71 Raleigh Super Course
    Posts
    2,474
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Heat it up pretty good-- enough so a wet finger sizzles on it-- and hit it with the PB Blaster again. As the metal cools, capillarity draws the oil further in. Try removal again, if it doesn't come off easily, do another heat/soak cycle. It might take 2 or 3 or more, and that's OK. Time is cheap. Heating isn't entirely useless, because the metals expand and contract at different rates and a few cycles of this help break any corrosion bond.

    You will have to overhaul the hub bearings, though, as the heat drives off some of what makes grease, grease. No big deal, though, it's already off the bike and after 2 years it's probably due for an o/h anyway.
    '71 Raleigh Super Course ("Loose Change")
    '74 Raleigh Professional
    '7? VeloSolex L'Etoile rando build ("Chocolate Star")
    '77 Peugeot UE/O-8/10/9 mongrel
    '81 Trek 616
    '87 Trek 560 Pro Series
    '88 Schwinn Impact ("Burning Chrome")
    '92 Specialized Allez Comp
    '08 Specialized Crossroads winterbike ("Icicle the Bicycle")

  14. #14
    Senior Member cruisintx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Fritch, Tx
    My Bikes
    Felt F80, Trek 730, Raleigh M40
    Posts
    274
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Based on considerable experience with extremely stobborn nuts & bolts on motorcycles, the only thing I can offer here is use of a different type of thread loosening liquid. When I encounter difficult removals, I use a 50/50 mixture of automatic transmision fluid and acetone. The acetone creates a very good capillary effect carrying the ATF into the threads. Let that sit for an hour or two and then use your lock-ring tool or hammer & punch.
    Primary rides:

    2000 BMW R1200C
    2000 BMW R1100RT
    1979 BMW R80S

    1996 TREK 730 hybrid 21 spd
    2005 FELT F80 road 27 spd

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Middle of the road, NJ
    Posts
    2,043
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A hammer and punch, or a j shaped lockring tool will give the best result as you'l be able to use impact force(if you know what I mean, think air impact gun) to losen the bond.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •