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Old 03-30-12, 10:26 AM   #1
TallOneJosh
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Just Picked up a bike and need some advice

Hi i just picked up an old 12 speed Shogun Cr-mo 400 and I am interested in updating it with newer components, shifters, handlebars, brakes and such. But I am new to the sport of cycling and am not sure what to do first. It currently has stem shifters and i would like to upgrade to STI shifters if possible, but what would i need to do the swap? I understand that it would be cheaper to buy a new bike for normal people, but I am 6'11 with a 38-39" inseam and this bike is the biggest i could find without paying thousands of dollars for a custom bike. Any advice would be appreciated, Thanks.


Here are some pics if the bike:




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Old 03-30-12, 10:39 AM   #2
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You have to decide how much you're willing to put into a not so exciting older bike. Also be aware that with the longer posts in use today, and the availability of high angle stems, fitting you may not be the problem you imagine. Before spending a penny, visit a decent, knowledgeable shop, and see what your options really are.

Then if you decide to put lots of dough into this frame, the cheapest ways are to wither buy a decent used bike with the right component group and transfer everything over. Or to buy a new bike and do the same. Either option will probably mean spreading the rear triangle to 130mm, and making sure that the key points of fit match, namely the bottom bracket, brake reach, and headset/fork/stem, and the seatpost unless you keep yours.

The most expensive and, IMO, dumbest option is to start buying a large number of expensive new parts piecemeal.
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Old 03-30-12, 10:41 AM   #3
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I hope you didn't pay too much for it. The frame is bent!

And it's not upgradeable to STI unless you buy new derailleurs. And if you did that and even if the frame weren't bent, it wouldn't be a sound investment.

Keep the bike for its parts, though.
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Old 03-30-12, 10:41 AM   #4
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If you want something decent, you should prolly keep looking. That bike doesn't have an integrated derailleur hanger; pretty much any worthwhile frame without one is a fair bit older than that... and if you put nice gear on it, its aesthetics are dragged down by the fugly steel claw. It's a telltale for crapness.

But it might not bother you... in any case, having found a cheap bike with a frame you want to use, the best way to complete it with decent components is just to buy a whole other bike. Cheapest by far.

Things to look out for include, brake reach, particularly if going from 27" to 700c, seat tube ID (seatpost) and OD (FD clamp). You'll also need to drill the frame and forks to accept modern brakes, and spread the rear triangle to accommodate a 130mm hub, unless you want to be half-arsed about it.

I really wouldn't bother with this bike. You'd be much better off getting hold of something from at least the late 80s as a basis, then you wouldn't need to empty it over a bin. Minimum spec: 700c, 7spd (preferably 8spd). Then you can just throw some shifters at it.

To get something worth bothering with, you'll prolly have to spend at least $200-250. Something like this.

Last edited by Kimmo; 03-30-12 at 10:58 AM.
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Old 03-30-12, 10:50 AM   #5
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Almost nothing on that bike is worth keeping and you will spend a fortune if you attack it piecemeal. Many modern parts aren't going to fit without some significant changes.

Also, If noglider is right, the first thing you must do is to take it to a bike shop and have the alignment checked.

FBinNY is correct and getting a better, newer bike to fit you could well be cheaper and less frustrating than trying to update this one.
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Old 03-30-12, 10:50 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
I hope you didn't pay too much for it. The frame is bent!

Keep the bike for its parts, though.
The photos didn't upload the first time I posted, or I would have posted differently.

Tom is absolutely right. This frame is bent and has all the classic signs of having been in a front end collision.

I wouldn't put anything into it, unless it was a tiny amount to make it serviceable as a beater or local transport bike. If you're new to the sport, this might be your best option, get it rolling for little or no added investment, then if you get more serious about cycling invest in something decent and matched to your needs.

I used to start "upgrade" posts saying that you can't make a silk purse from a sow's ear, but folks got offended so I stopped. If I had seen the photo I definitely would have said that, and then added that you don't even have a decent sow's ear.

Keep it as a beater, or trash it, but don't put money into this dog.
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Old 03-30-12, 11:13 AM   #7
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Bent frame. I agree. Sorry to say it.
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Old 03-30-12, 11:15 AM   #8
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Didn't notice the bent forks; for a quick and dirty fix you could loosen the stem, turn the forks around and run into something a few times ; )

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Bent frame. I agree. Sorry to say it.
Frame itself looks alright to me. Remember, big frames have steep head angles and slack seat angles.
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Old 03-30-12, 11:16 AM   #9
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Also, keep looking,. That bike is likely a 64cm frame, which is pretty big, but not the biggest you will find.

THere is a tool some bikes hops have that will pull the headtube back out to where it is supposed to be. Older steel frames like that one are the best candidates. Call around. THis would get the Shogun on the road while you keep shopping for another non-damaged bike that fits even better.
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Old 03-30-12, 11:25 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kimmo View Post
Didn't notice the bent forks; for a quick and dirty fix you could loosen the stem, turn the forks around and run into something a few times ; )



Frame itself looks alright to me. Remember, big frames have steep head angles and slack seat angles.
Not the forks - clearly the frame. The forks may be ok. Edit: THe forks appear to come straight out of the head tube and curve in front of the head tube. There seems to be cracked paint near the head/down tube junction and perhaps even a visible curve int he down tube.

To the OP: Can you post a closer picture of the front half of the frame? A side view would be most helpful. Just because I am curious - the frame (or fork) is clearly buggered and that pretty much makes the bike worthless, unfortunately.

Last edited by DCB0; 03-30-12 at 11:34 AM.
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Old 03-30-12, 11:26 AM   #11
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There's a half dozen 64cm steel frames on eBay right now with decent pricing. Also a 66cm Cannondale that's spaced at 126.
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Old 03-30-12, 11:42 AM   #12
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One more thing:

Check this link for a reasonably priced (everything is relative) frame available up to 66cm. You could buy a budget road bike from, say, Bikesdirect.com, and swap all th parts over to the Soma frame.

Here is another option, but only available up to 64cm, wich may be a touch on the small side... http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes...d_1_series/1_5
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Old 03-30-12, 01:17 PM   #13
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Yeah, that frame is done for, sadly. Not a bad bike, but best to keep looking.
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