Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    Oldie Again's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Medford, Oregon
    My Bikes
    Lance Exodus Europe, Univega Sportour, Motobecane Cafe Latte
    Posts
    411
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    what do you use to cut your CF steerer?

    I have run "search" for "cut steerer", but found nothing. I am sure there is some discussion of it somewhere in here, but I never find much with "search".
    So, what do YOU use to get a clean, square cut?

  2. #2
    Still spinnin'..... Stealthammer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Whitestown, IN
    My Bikes
    Fisher Opie freeride/urban assault MTB, Redline Monocog 29er MTB, Serrota T-Max Commuter, Klein Rascal SS, Salsa Campion Road bike, Pake Rum Runner FG/SS Road bike, Cannondale Synapse Road bike, Santana Arriva Road Tandem, and others....
    Posts
    1,195
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Abrasive wheel chop saw.

    .....or an angle grinder in a pinch.
    Just your average 'high-functioning' lunatic, capable of passing as 'normal' for short periods of time.....

    “The difference between genius and stupidity is; genius has its limits.” - Albert Einstein

    “We all know that light travels faster than sound. That's why certain people appear bright until you hear them speak.” - Albert Einstein

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    25,222
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Fine tooth hacksaw (32tpi or more), a cutting guide and very light pressure. I happen to have a steerer cutting guide (Performance's "Spin Doctor" version) but a stainless steel hose clamp tightened around the steerer with one edge right on the cut line can be an effective saw guide too. Put a layer of masking tape spanning the cut to prevent any splintering and, again, very light saw pressure.

    DO NOT use a pipe or tubing cutter.

  4. #4
    Map maker cbchess's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Richmond,VA
    My Bikes
    Ventana El Ciclon, Walt Works 29er, Specialized Enduro (fixed up for my son).
    Posts
    730
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    a dremel with cut off wheel will work too. go slow . Don't breath the carbon fiber dust.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Rochelle, NY
    My Bikes
    too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
    Posts
    19,535
    Mentioned
    27 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    Fine tooth hacksaw (32tpi or more), a cutting guide and very light pressure. ....

    DO NOT use a pipe or tubing cutter.
    +1, a plain, boring, old tech hacksaw is the correct tool for this job. use a fresh fine tooth blade, and long (full blade) strokes at moderate pressure for a fast clean cut. When finished clean up the cut with sandpaper on a block. I then seal the cut with clear nail polish.

    BTW- a perfectly square cut isn't necessary. The tube ends in space, and a gap is needed under the top cap. It doesn't matter if the gap is perfectly square.
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Elwood Indiana
    My Bikes
    1985 Eddy Merckx Coursa Extra,1985 Trek 670, 1985 Trek 660, 2013 Mercier Kilo TT
    Posts
    2,044
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Hacksaw here, worked great maybe cause I used my $40 park saw and not my $10 hardware saw with the same blade. Gift from my wife, she try's
    Semper fi

  7. #7
    Fat but Fit!
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Iowa
    My Bikes
    Lynskey R340, Lynskey R230, Fisher Zebrano
    Posts
    169
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I did some research and found that a bi-metal hacksaw blade was recommended. Found these at Lowes:

    http://tinyurl.com/6u86qcz

    Was able later to use cutting a titanium seat post as well.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Rochelle, NY
    My Bikes
    too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
    Posts
    19,535
    Mentioned
    27 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by gizzsdad View Post
    I did some research and found that a bi-metal hacksaw blade was recommended. Found these at Lowes:

    http://tinyurl.com/6u86qcz

    Was able later to use cutting a titanium seat post as well.
    A bi-metal balde doesn't improve the cut, it just makes the saw stay sharp longer. Most decent blades these days are bi-metal -- hard (brittle) steel where the teeth are, hi-tensile spring steel for the rest of the blade. It isn't a new idea, the Japanese have been using the principle to make Samurai swords for decades. Bi-metal construction allows them to retain that "5-body" razor edge yet be tough enough not to snap when struck.
    Last edited by FBinNY; 04-03-12 at 09:40 AM.
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  9. #9
    Senior Member BCRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    The 'Wack, BC, Canada
    My Bikes
    Norco (2), Miyata, Canondale, Soma, Redline
    Posts
    5,402
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Because of the dust and smell involved using a Dremel would be my absolute last ditch option. It's simply one of the jobs where a Dremel is the least desireable method going. Despite what the ads say a small high speed rotary tool is a specialty tool and not a general purpose "does everything" tool like they'd have us believe.

    FB', you're right that the cut doesn't NEED to be totally square. But let's face facts...... anyone OCD enough to get a fork with a carbon steerer is OCD enough to want the cut to be straight across to within less than half a degree.....

    While I've avoided any carbon bikes I do use some carbon tubing and rod products in my model airplanes from time to time. The best way to deal with it is again a fine tooth saw blade. So far I've made do with using Zona razor saws. Bu I've found that the carbon is quite abrasive to the steel so next time and in the future I'll stick with a cheap fine tooth hacksaw rather than ruin a nice razor trimming saw which SHOULD last for many years of balsa, spruce and thin plywoods.
    Model airplanes are cool too!.....

  10. #10
    Senior Member IthaDan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Ithaca, NY
    My Bikes
    Click on the #YOLO
    Posts
    4,619
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    24 or more tpi hacksaw and a hose clamp (or a wrap of masking tape) to keep square. Clamp the fork lightly in a sacrificial fluffy bath towel if needed.

  11. #11
    aka Tom Reingold noglider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    West Village, New York City
    My Bikes
    too many
    Posts
    18,189
    Mentioned
    22 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    In addition to the other advice, I recommend screwing a nut on, below the point where you will cut. After cutting, removing the nut will help clean the threads up.
    Please email me rather than sending me a private message. My address is noglider@pobox.com

    Tom Reingold
    West Village, New York City and High Falls, NY
    noglider's ride blog

  12. #12
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    38,463
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    you could make a square miter box of wood, best with a v in the base,
    thus have the saw blade at 90 degrees..
    and rotate the steerer tube, as you cut, and the cut will be more lathe like.

    of course having a lathe, you just chuck up the steerer
    and hold the hacksaw and the work rotates under it

    Are you REALLY sure the height is precisely what you need?

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Spokane, WA
    My Bikes
    Specialized Sequoia Elite/Motobecane Fantom Cross Team Ti/'85 Trek 520
    Posts
    2,230
    Mentioned
    4 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Why should one not use a pipe or tubing cutter? I'm assuming since that they are designed for soft materials unlike CF. What could happen if you try to use a pipe cutter?

    I'm just wondering out loud.

  14. #14
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    38,463
    Mentioned
    20 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Tubing cutters just shove soft metals out of the way pushing a harder wheel
    continuing to be forced into the metal..
    they actually do not cut out metal. ..

    crushing your composite steerer is not a good thing..

  15. #15
    Oldie Again's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Medford, Oregon
    My Bikes
    Lance Exodus Europe, Univega Sportour, Motobecane Cafe Latte
    Posts
    411
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Thanks, guys, I appreciate your input!
    Went to Lowe's for a 32tpi hacksaw and hose clamp and did the cleanest steerer cut ever!
    And it seems to be reflected in the tightest headset installation to date! Apparently the damage done in the past by using a tube cutter made tight installation difficult.
    Thanks again, this makes building much more fun!

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Rochelle, NY
    My Bikes
    too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
    Posts
    19,535
    Mentioned
    27 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by noglider View Post
    In addition to the other advice, I recommend screwing a nut on, below the point where you will cut. After cutting, removing the nut will help clean the threads up.

    Tom, go brew yourself a cup,of coffee.

    The OP asked about carbon steerers, which don't exist in threaded versions.

    cheers
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  17. #17
    Senior Member IthaDan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Ithaca, NY
    My Bikes
    Click on the #YOLO
    Posts
    4,619
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Again View Post
    Thanks, guys, I appreciate your input!
    Went to Lowe's for a 32tpi hacksaw and hose clamp and did the cleanest steerer cut ever!
    And it seems to be reflected in the tightest headset installation to date! Apparently the damage done in the past by using a tube cutter made tight installation difficult.
    Thanks again, this makes building much more fun!
    I had this as well, and I too thoug it was the cut, turns out I had the expansion nut tight and that expanded the steered just enough that the headset had trouble sliding over. Keep the nut loose until you have it all assembled and it's time to preload the bearings.

  18. #18
    Senior Member IthaDan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Ithaca, NY
    My Bikes
    Click on the #YOLO
    Posts
    4,619
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by bobotech View Post
    Why should one not use a pipe or tubing cutter? I'm assuming since that they are designed for soft materials unlike CF. What could happen if you try to use a pipe cutter?

    I'm just wondering out loud.
    Point pressure= point stress = cf cracks = bad bad news.

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,475
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Just to pipe in after the discussion is over 8-)

    Yes, a nice new and/or sharp high TPI hacksaw blade is all you need.

    perfectly square is indeed not needed. If it just is too off square, you can pretty easily use a good stout flat file and touch it up, holding the end of the steer tupe against a carpenter's square and up to a light to identify the parts that need to be squared up. You can really get it right on w/ just a few minutes of easy, careful filing. But it's not essential to be perfect.

    A miter box type jig really doesn't work well with a hack saw. The simple box-type are really meant to work with a back saw which is a very stiff saw with a very stiff spine. A hacksaw blade is too floppy to really be held square by the miter box, in my experience. The other, more "professional" type of rigs really are made to hold the saw's stiff spine, and the ones I tried really didn't work well with the spine on a hacksaw.

    Maybe it could be made to work, or get one that's specifically made for a hacksaw blade, or get a back saw with really fine hacksaw-like teeth, but using the ones I have in my shop, my cuts were no better than if I'd just scribed a square line around the steer tube and then just cut carefully by hand (which is what I did and then touched up w/ a flat file).

    The usual addages apply: measure twice cut once, do a practice cut before the final cut, etc. It's really not a difficult thing to do, but the consequences of an error are expensive!
    Last edited by Camilo; 04-03-12 at 12:57 PM.

  20. #20
    Senior member Dan Burkhart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Oakville Ontario
    Posts
    4,796
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    Tom, go brew yourself a cup,of coffee.

    The OP asked about carbon steerers, which don't exist in threaded versions.

    cheers
    Ha! I was just going to ask him where he finds threaded carbon steer tubes.
    Gearhubs demystified and other cool stuff.


    Rule #12: The correct number of bikes to own is n+1

  21. #21
    bike whisperer Kimmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, Oz
    My Bikes
    copy/paste links: http://velospace.org/node/36949 http://velospace.org/node/47746 http://velospace.org/node/47747
    Posts
    6,784
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by noglider View Post
    In addition to the other advice, I recommend screwing a nut on, below the point where you will cut. After cutting, removing the nut will help clean the threads up.
    Lolwut? There's such a thing as a threaded carbon steerer?

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    621
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    So the best way to cut a threaded carbon steerer is to use a samurai sword?

  23. #23
    dbg
    dbg is offline
    Si Senior dbg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Naperville, Illinois
    My Bikes
    Too Numerous (not)
    Posts
    2,299
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    Tom, go brew yourself a cup,of coffee.

    The OP asked about carbon steerers, which don't exist in threaded versions.

    cheers
    But it is a good idea for threaded cuts and is now firmly in my future plans.
    David Green, Naperville, IL USA "The older I get, the better I used to be" --Lee Trevino

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •