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  1. #1
    Senior Member oldnslow2's Avatar
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    Recommendation for truing stand

    Looking for recommendation for a truing stand for my son. He's worked as a mechanic while in college and i'd like to get him one as a gift now that he's graduated. I'd like recommendations for "home mechanic" and "professional" quality stands. It will needs to be able to do road wheels and 29" mountain bike wheels. If the "pro" is not much more, I might go for it.

    thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member cyclist2000's Avatar
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    I don't know about professional quality but I have a Park Tool TS 2.2, it is a nice truing stand, the same as used in the local co-op. A lot of the cheaper stands work but this one has nice features and gauges can be added. Cost is about $200.
    I don't do vintage, I bought them new, rode them, kept them. Now they are just old bikes
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/bustercrb/sets/72157623483647522/

  3. #3
    Senior Member oldnslow2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclist2000 View Post
    I don't know about professional quality but I have a Park Tool TS 2.2, it is a nice truing stand, the same as used in the local co-op. A lot of the cheaper stands work but this one has nice features and gauges can be added. Cost is about $200.
    Park was the first one I saw and know they make quality tools. Just wondering if the cheaper ones are any good. While $200 is not cheap, it's not expensive when considering tools that should last a lifetime.

  4. #4
    DRF aka Thrifty Bill wrk101's Avatar
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    Start looking for a used TS 2.2. The Park trying stand is much nicer than the cheap models. With adapters, a TS 2 will work.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Bill Kapaun's Avatar
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    I started with a TS-8 for my "casual use".
    After a couple months, I picked up a used TS-2.
    The TS-8 worked, but you had to constantly flip the wheel to get a "good" idea where you were.
    The TS-2 gave a much better "picture" of where you were.

    I still flip the wheel a bit with the TS-2, because it seems to lose its "center" when going from front to rear (or opposite) spacing.
    Where the TS-2 series really outshines the TS-8, is being able to see if an old rim has "wallowed out" from hitting a curb etc. You can run a caliper around the rim to do this, but that's kind of a pain.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Jed19's Avatar
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    Yep, I second the TS-2.2, as it most likely will be the last truing stand he will need to buy. They are solid and reliable.

    Also look on Craigslist, as that was where I found mine. The guy I bought it from got it as a gift, but never even took it out of the box.
    Regards,

    Jed

  7. #7
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    I bought my TS-2 truing stand in 1989 and have gotten my money out of it having built over 500 wheelsets. Saves a tonne of time as you can adjust lateral, vertical and dish in a single operation. Occasionally needs some service, cleaning and adjustment. It's been pretty much bulletproof.

  8. #8
    don't try this at home. rm -rf's Avatar
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    For occasional use, I like my Spin Doctor truing stand. I bought it 7 or 8 years ago. I've build a few wheels from scratch, cleaned up the inconsistent tension on a couple of cheap spare wheels, and made occasional minor truing adjustments.

    The axle support arms are self-centering, quite accurately. I have to (lightly) clamp the wheel with a quick release, though. As a double check, when I'm done, I can put the wheel on the bike, adjust the brakes for even gaps on both sides, then flip the wheel and it's still centered correctly between the pads.

    I like how the feeler gauges can be twisted and pushed into the rim individually. I'll determine which side needs the biggest adjustment, and just use that feeler. I use the sound of the feeler rubbing the high spot to determine exactly where the rim is out of true.

    It's pretty sturdy for an aluminum and plastic tool. I don't build a lot of wheels, but I do fine tune my wheels occasionally. It's held up great. I'm pretty picky about side-to-side true, and I can get the wheel very even.

    Once my good wheels are true, and the spoke are as evenly tensioned as possible, I rarely have to touch up the truing, even after big pothole hits. So I don't need to use it very often, but it's very nice to have one for the occasional minor adjustments, even ones that aren't annoying enough to take it into a shop. It's nice to get the last bit of faint brake pulsing out of the wheel.

    I have a tiny crack at one spoke hole, due to a couple of big pothole hits last winter. (due to night group rides that didn't call out the holes, grrr) I'll be replacing the rim later this summer.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    A one-sided stand, like the TS-8, would drive me crazy. I spin the wheel, slide in both feelers, then see which side has the highest spot. Working on just that side, I'll reduce that high spot, then recheck both sides. Often, the next highest spot is on the other side. It would be a lot harder with a single-sided stand.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    If your son plans to build wheels, or even fix cheaper wheels that don't have even tension from the factory, a tension meter is really useful. I don't have the long-term experience to know how much tension is needed, just by feel. So the tension meter gets the correct tension on the spokes for long wheel life, and it's good for checking for even tension between all the spokes. It's quick and easy to use.

    See the Park TM-1

    41FV2x0yUJL._SL500_AA300_.jpg
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    Last edited by rm -rf; 05-12-12 at 08:36 PM.

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