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  1. #1
    babylon by bike Standalone's Avatar
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    New rim took 5 miles worth of old pads damage-- should I smooth or buff or leave be?

    Things sounded dry on a ride home from my LBS with my new used fixer-upper tandem. It came with brand new Salsa Gordo rims/ tandem hubs and a new sugino crankset and sora FD. (sweet!)

    There was no back brake and no rear seatpost, so I rode it over to my LBS to make sure the spec'd 26.6 sp would fit. Oops. I think I put a year's worth of wear in the rim....

    I pulled the canti pads and saw that they were rock hard and basically silver on the braking surface. Yikes. Things sounded dry on that quick ride, but I didn't realize they looked that bad. I felt around the machine surface, and there are no bad gouges or anything, and all the ridges are still there... but the surface does feel rougher than the rear rim (both salsa gordos).

    Should I smooth things out before putting the bike to heavy use -- or just let natural pad/rim wear take care of things, and maybe replace/check the pads more often for a while?

    I don't think I did any serious damage-- these are pretty tough rims-- but I wondered whether I should do anything to them to minimize any future damage.
    The bicycle, the bicycle surely, should always be the vehicle of novelists and poets. Christopher Morley

  2. #2
    babylon by bike Standalone's Avatar
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    I'm probably worrying about something that doesn't really matter-- these are pretty hardcore rims, and are only going to see road use, so a little bit of wear probably isn't a big deal.

    I'll just make sure to check the brake pads often and change them out since they'll probably pick up a little debris more quickly since I roughed up the surface a bit.
    The bicycle, the bicycle surely, should always be the vehicle of novelists and poets. Christopher Morley

  3. #3
    Senior Member bikeman715's Avatar
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    I would just let the brake pads and rims take care themselves . they will wear in over time . check the pads when cleaning the bike and remove anything that is inbeded in them .
    bikeman715

  4. #4
    bike whisperer Kimmo's Avatar
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    I'd clean the pads with a file or by dragging them over concrete.

  5. #5
    babylon by bike Standalone's Avatar
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    No, the pads are in the trash. They were rock hard and not worth saving. New pads are already on there. I just wanted to know if it was common practice to take steps to smooth out minor roughness on the rim.

    Sounds to me like it's not, and that's just fine with me. I do think that the pads will be more likely to pick up bits of aluminum for a while. So I'll just check them / change them out more often for a while, which is annoying, but oh well. I got a great deal on the bike, and it's coming together really nicely!
    The bicycle, the bicycle surely, should always be the vehicle of novelists and poets. Christopher Morley

  6. #6
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    Well, if the new rims were scratched by the old pads which had bits of metal in them, these gouges in the new rim can cause additional chips to flake off into the new pads. Which then causes more scratches and gouging and the process repeats itself.

    You'll want to inspect the scratches in the rim carefully and if any of them look rough and prone to chipping at the edges, smooth the sharp edges with 1000 grit wet sandpaper. Inspect your new pads daily for a while and pick out all metal flakes as soon as possible.

  7. #7
    babylon by bike Standalone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DannoXYZ View Post
    Well, if the new rims were scratched by the old pads which had bits of metal in them, these gouges in the new rim can cause additional chips to flake off into the new pads. Which then causes more scratches and gouging and the process repeats itself.

    You'll want to inspect the scratches in the rim carefully and if any of them look rough and prone to chipping at the edges, smooth the sharp edges with 1000 grit wet sandpaper. Inspect your new pads daily for a while and pick out all metal flakes as soon as possible.
    Right. This is what I was thinking, but I wanted confirmation that people have done this to their rims. Superfine wet sandpaper is exactly what I was thinking, too...

    Inspecting canti pads daily is pretty lame...
    The bicycle, the bicycle surely, should always be the vehicle of novelists and poets. Christopher Morley

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