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  1. #1
    Senior Member PatrickGSR94's Avatar
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    Can I mount fenders on this bike?

    After a group ride in some rainy weather on Saturday, I decided I *really* need some fenders on my bike. However I'm not sure if the frame will accept fenders or not.

    My front suspension fork does not appear to have the eyelets for a front fender. However I'm planning on switching over to a rigid fork soon that does have the eyelets for fenders: http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...28_-1___202440

    The rear I'm not so sure about. There are no eyelets that I can see near the rear dropouts. However on the inside of each seat stay and chain stay bar there is an open hole just ahead of the dropouts (4 holes total). I don't have a pic of them at this time.

    Also there is an odd-looking bracket above the rear brake that doesn't appear to be used for anything at this point, but perhaps could be for the cable of center-pull brakes?



    Are there any fenders that could clamp on to the seat and chain stay tubes instead of using eyelets? Or maybe some sort of clamp "adapters" that would allow the use of normal fenders?
    2011 Felt Z85 105 | Ultegra | KMC | Selle Italia | Vuelta | Topeak
    90's-ish KHS Alite 1000 MTB, *hybridized*

  2. #2
    Senior Member IthaDan's Avatar
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    The holes on the insides of the stays are to vent welding gasses, otherwise the frame would be a pipe bomb.

    The bracket above the middle of the brake is indeed a hanger for canti brakes.

    With no mount holes on the dropouts, you'd be stuck with p-clamps around the seatstays, which isn't impossible and certainly sturdy, while up front you could attach to the hole in the seatstay bridge and clamp around the (presumed) chainstay bridge.

    Another option is a fender that clamps to the seatpost and over the tire (google "backscratcher fenders"). These aren't as good in a total deluge as a full fenders and you'll certainly still get wet shoes, but for keeping the skunk stripe off the center of your shirt, they're than adequate. Plus, they don't have the mud clogging issues of full fenders.

    FWIW, It might be a tight fit with knobbies, v-brakes and fenders all trying to occupy the same space. Full fenders would ride between the cable of the brakes and the tire.

    Also, there are some fenders which really just keep crud out of your eyes which attach to the downtube, again keeping mud issues at bay and letting the fork telescope.

    Edit: I feel like I should bulletpoint this, it's all fragments.

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  3. #3
    Senior Member DannoXYZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatrickGSR94 View Post
    Also there is an odd-looking bracket above the rear brake that doesn't appear to be used for anything at this point, but perhaps could be for the cable of center-pull brakes?
    Yes, this is the cable-stop for cantilever brakes.


    Quote Originally Posted by PatrickGSR94 View Post
    Are there any fenders that could clamp on to the seat and chain stay tubes instead of using eyelets? Or maybe some sort of clamp "adapters" that would allow the use of normal fenders?
    All fenders are pretty much mount the same, the difference being different mounting brackets for different frames. You'll want a centre-bracket for the top that bolts to the hole in the brake-bridge.

    For the lower fender stays, you'll want P-clamps that goes around the seat-stays:
    http://www.swagelok.com/images/cmi/_Tubing/pclamp.jpg


    I hear that Home Depot has them for $1.95.

  4. #4
    Senior Member PatrickGSR94's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IthaDan View Post
    The holes on the insides of the stays are to vent welding gasses, otherwise the frame would be a pipe bomb.

    The bracket above the middle of the brake is indeed a hanger for canti brakes.

    With no mount holes on the dropouts, you'd be stuck with p-clamps around the seatstays, which isn't impossible and certainly sturdy, while up front you could attach to the hole in the seatstay bridge and clamp around the (presumed) chainstay bridge.

    Another option is a fender that clamps to the seatpost and over the tire (google "backscratcher fenders"). These aren't as good in a total deluge as a full fenders and you'll certainly still get wet shoes, but for keeping the skunk stripe off the center of your shirt, they're than adequate. Plus, they don't have the mud clogging issues of full fenders.

    FWIW, It might be a tight fit with knobbies, v-brakes and fenders all trying to occupy the same space. Full fenders would ride between the cable of the brakes and the tire.

    Also, there are some fenders which really just keep crud out of your eyes which attach to the downtube, again keeping mud issues at bay and letting the fork telescope.

    Edit: I feel like I should bulletpoint this, it's all fragments.
    Thanks, the pic above is older when I had the knobby tires. Now I have 26x1.5" road tires, so I'm looking for fenders to use with the road tires - not off-road MTB fenders.
    2011 Felt Z85 105 | Ultegra | KMC | Selle Italia | Vuelta | Topeak
    90's-ish KHS Alite 1000 MTB, *hybridized*

  5. #5
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    Most bike shops will have inexpensive fenders to use with 26" tires. You can easily attach w/ P clamps at the dropouts if there's no eyelets. The other connection points in the rear are the seat stay bridge (which is pictured in your photo, and there's a hole there so no problem), and the chain stay bridge which doesn't require a hole for most fenders - they have a clip that snaps on that bridge. If not, you will figure something out with zip ties (might require drilling holes in fender), P clamps or both.

    In the front the only other connection point is the fork crown. If your bike does not have a hole there, it's easy to figure out away to fasten the fender with zip ties, again, possibly with new holes drilled in the fender.

    Really, with zip ties, a willingness to make minor modifications in the fenders, and some P clamps, any bike with adequate clearance can fit fenders.

  6. #6
    Senior Member surreal's Avatar
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    you may use fenders
    v-brakes will interfere, though
    drop-bolts suggested.

    As others have said
    you'll also need p-clips and, well,
    enduring patience.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by surreal View Post
    you may use fenders
    v-brakes will interfere, though
    drop-bolts suggested.

    As others have said
    you'll also need p-clips and, well,
    enduring patience.
    I've put fenders on at least three (maybe four) bikes with V Brakes - no problem.

  8. #8
    Constant tinkerer FastJake's Avatar
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    Sure, you should be able to put fenders on that bike. Either clip-on or screw-on depending on your eyelet situation. I've put fenders on bikes with V-brakes before. Clearance is tight but once you get them mounted you never touch them again.

    Switching to a rigid fork and slick tires? Group rides? Are you trying to turn this thing into a road bike? Before you spend too much money, you may be better off getting an old road bike that will accept decent size tires + fenders.
    Why "derailer" is the correct way to spell the gear-change mechanism: sheldonbrown.com/derailer.html

  9. #9
    Senior Member surreal's Avatar
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    if you look at the picture provided, on this particular bike, the noodle will intersect with the typical full-coverage fender. If the rigid fork he is getting is suspension-corrected, the noodle will be located BELOW the fender, unless a drop-bolt is used. (If the fork is not suspension-corrected, front-end geometry will be effected significantly, and not in a good way, I predict.)

    I've run full fenders on bikes with V-brakes, and it's fairly painless on early MTBs, and very painless on many hybrids & touring bikes. But, you're going to need a few extra bits on the typical v-brake-equipped MTB. Specifically, he'll need drop-bolts.

    -rob

    ps- for the record, while some folks swear by clip-on type fenders, or "back scratchers" and the like, there is nothing out there that can compete with real full fenders.

  10. #10
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    planet bike has strap on type full fenders. they work ok

  11. #11
    Senior Member PatrickGSR94's Avatar
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    Suspension fork I'm looking at is height-corrected, axle to crown is 453mm according to the specs which is almost exactly what my suspension fork is when unloaded. When I'm riding it bottoms out and is much shorter, which I believe causes me to have more weight on my hands and the handlebars than I would otherwise.



    I may have to come up with some way to attach fenders to each side of the fork rather than to the upper middle portion.

    I'm not a full on drop-bar roadie, I just enjoy occasional riding on the road, and may eventually try to commute some to work. I'm actually thinking of changing out the handle bars and stem for something with more rise so I'm not bent over as much while riding.
    2011 Felt Z85 105 | Ultegra | KMC | Selle Italia | Vuelta | Topeak
    90's-ish KHS Alite 1000 MTB, *hybridized*

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatrickGSR94 View Post
    I may have to come up with some way to attach fenders to each side of the fork rather than to the upper middle portion.
    Use a v-brake booster like this.

  13. #13
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    I have a short travel suspension fork that was re machined to drill and thread holes
    to mount Mudguards on it , near the bottom
    the top arch has a hole in it to mount onto,

    the forks on Trek 2.0 Navigators have some holes already threaded ,
    but they are on the back of the lower leg, so a little cleverness
    and bending the struts , is utilized, to mount onto them.

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