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  1. #1
    I couldn't car less. jeff williams's Avatar
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    Dropout and axle length Q? Older wheels newer frame.

    I have a 98 Specialized Rockhopper mtb bike with stock rims, the frame is suspect as it has a dent in the downtube.
    As a local replacement I found a Brodie spark 01 with manitou mars forks.
    Are axle\dropout lengths going to be an issue, swapping wheels?
    I have to build cheap and these are different horses.

    Thanks you.
    Last edited by jeff williams; 05-21-12 at 01:06 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member oldbobcat's Avatar
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    Depends on the age of the Rockhopper. The early ones that used 7-speed freewheels had 130mm spacing between the dropouts. When 8-speed freehubs became the standard, spacing grew to 135mm.

    Nowadays all standard mountain bikes and hybrids use 135.

  3. #3
    Senior Member gyozadude's Avatar
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    By around 1998, most MTBs were 135mm spacing in the rear, where your main concern will be. It's fairly easy to check. Pop the QR on the rear wheel, measure the dropouts with a metric ruler with mm, and then measure the new frame. Some new frames even sport 140mm. Go figure. The primary issues beyond the axle spacing, might be if the new frame uses disc brakes but the older rockhopper wheels are using cantilever/V-brakes, and if you do need to get new axles, they aren't expensive, but you can order new axles and add a spacer to the non-drive side, but you'll need to re-dish the wheel. Don't forget new cables and housing might be needed if cable routing is different (and longer on the new frame).
    Yes, I can roll my own potsticker skins!

  4. #4
    Constant tinkerer FastJake's Avatar
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    +1

    Just measure. 99.9% chance a 98 Rockhopper has 135mm spacing, but measure both to be sure. Other main issue is the brake setup. Cantis/V-brakes are similar but have their own quirks, and disc brakes are obviously a whole different animal.
    Why "derailer" is the correct way to spell the gear-change mechanism: sheldonbrown.com/derailer.html

  5. #5
    Senior Member mrrabbit's Avatar
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    135mm

    =8-)
    4000+ wheels built since 1984...

    Disclaimer:

    1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
    2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
    3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
    4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
    5. My all time favorite book is:

    Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life

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