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  1. #1
    Senior Member escarpment's Avatar
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    Cracked lug, can I fix it with epoxy?

    I was given an old steel reynolds 530something frame and there is a crack in the lug where the top tube and head tube meet. I am curious if I can use epoxy to fill the gap, The frame itself is still structurally sound it is just the top part of the lug that has a crack.

  2. #2
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    i would see if you could get it filled with braze from a bike builder or engineering shop as the lug has craked it may have craked the braze too and that would lead to the frame braking more than likley when your on it too which would be a trip to A&E.

  3. #3
    Half way there gmt13's Avatar
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    Rarely is epoxy a good fix but it may work. Pics would certainly be a help here.

    -G

  4. #4
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    The actual tensile strength of Epoxy is way below that of any metal, even brazing brass. I would have the lug repaired by brazing, or better yet, have it replaced by a competent frame builder.

  5. #5
    Constant tinkerer FastJake's Avatar
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    From the title I was expecting a carbon tubed frame.

    Epoxy to repair steel? Maybe cosmetically. If you are worried about the structural integrity of the frame get it brazed/welded properly.
    Why "derailer" is the correct way to spell the gear-change mechanism: sheldonbrown.com/derailer.html

  6. #6
    Old fart JohnDThompson's Avatar
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    Pictures would help us determine if this is more than just a cosmetic flaw. If it is in fact a structural concern, epoxy is not a solution.

  7. #7
    Senior Member mrrabbit's Avatar
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    Unlike BB. Seat Cluster and dropouts, playing loose the headtube junction like with fork crowns is risky business.

    Seriously conisder having a frame builder look at it.

    =8-)
    4000+ wheels built since 1984...

    Disclaimer:

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    Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life

  8. #8
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    A frame builder would be what I would consider an expert for the situation.

    The other day I had a muffler put on and the guy welded the exhaust pipe. It does not take much to impress me. I was impressed by the way the weld looked. I don't have a clue as to how strong a weld like that would be. Just a thought to be considered.

  9. #9
    Randomhead
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    I can't imagine that it could be properly fixed without a major repair. As above, good pictures are required

  10. #10
    Senior Member Homebrew01's Avatar
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    If you're lucky, it's not a crack, instead it's a void in the lug that didn't get properly filled
    Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim p View Post
    A frame builder would be what I would consider an expert for the situation.

    The other day I had a muffler put on and the guy welded the exhaust pipe. It does not take much to impress me. I was impressed by the way the weld looked. I don't have a clue as to how strong a weld like that would be. Just a thought to be considered.
    If a repair is needed, it needs to be brazed by someone who knows how to braze Reynolds tubing. The heat from welding would damage the tubing. Brazing requires less heat.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikepro View Post
    If a repair is needed, it needs to be brazed by someone who knows how to braze Reynolds tubing. The heat from welding would damage the tubing. Brazing requires less heat.
    +1 if it's a lugged frame, it's almost certainly brazed. Welding would damage or destroy the joint.

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