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Old 07-10-12, 06:16 AM   #1
Gege-Bubu
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Need Torque Wrench

Finally, I realized I could use a torque wrench on my bike maintenance. I was tightening all bike's bolts by hand so far, but I believe I overtighten them.

Do I need the best I can get, or cheaper would do too?

Will Venzo be ok?
http://www.amazon.com/VENZO-Bicycle-...=torque+wrench

or, I should get more expensive one?
http://www.amazon.com/Filzer-TW-1-To...rench+parktool

or, maybe you know where to buy cheaper/better tool?

Thanks!
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Old 07-10-12, 06:18 AM   #2
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Get a good tool. They will last a long time and will be used by your grandkids.
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Old 07-10-12, 06:32 AM   #3
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+100 on buying quality tools. Besides the better fit and ease of use of a better tool, many folks, myself included, derive a great deal of pleasure from owning and using fine tools. As mentioned above good tools properly maintained will outlive you and continue giving fine service to your children or grandchildren. I consider them practically art.
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Old 07-10-12, 07:03 AM   #4
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Think used. I picked up a nice Snap On torque wrench at a really attractive price.

If you want to consider a throw away, for light duty use, the Harbor Freight torque wrenches are OK, and go on sale all the time. Really depends on your budget.

Snap on tool pricing is pretty crazy, $272 for a 3/8 torque wrench!!! I have quite a few Snap On tools, but not a single one was bought new (I also have a few SO tool boxes, all bought used as well).
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Old 07-10-12, 09:26 AM   #5
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get 2.. a 1/4" drive, and a 3/8" drive.. you need the small one for smaller bolts..

there are beam, it bends, .. and a type that you set to a number,
and then .. turn bolt, till it goes click..
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Old 07-10-12, 02:19 PM   #6
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tHE BEAM TYPE IS CHEAP AND VERY ACCURATE.
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Old 07-10-12, 04:55 PM   #7
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The odd thing about having a torque wrench is that as you use it regularly you soon develop a sense for the correct torque and you'll find that you don't need it as much. It's fair to say that MOST regular wrench spinners only use their torque wrenches or torque screwdrivers for special applications where things need to be very closely matched or the risk of failure for even a slight over torqueing is high.

That said buying a decent but not top end model will do the job and last you for years if decently cared for. So it's worth buying an OK brand for a little more than the very cheapest imports but I would not suggest going for Snap On or similar high priced stuff simply due to the cost.

The beam style are reputed to work well. The catch is that you need to locate your eyes directly over the needle or the parallax error can result in wildly wrong readings. But on a bicycle this is seldom an issue since they are light enough to reposition the bike so you CAN see directly onto the reading face. But if you ever plan on using it in automotive or motorcycle applications the click style are a LOT more useful. And they don't cost all that much more.
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Old 07-10-12, 05:42 PM   #8
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Cheaper no better yes.
Think of tools as an investment, buy something good once and never again it will last for as long as your around if you take care of them.
I have several because I do much more than bikes but for your bike most bolts that you will use most times are going to be in the 4.5nm - 6nm range
For these the best one I've ever bought is a Wiha Adjustable Torque Control Screwdriver and the 1/4" Bit Holding Adapter and 1/4" Socket Holding Adapter for small bike parts this is my go to Torque Wrench.
I have clickers and beam Torque Wrenchs from 1/4 - 1/2" bigger stuff but for bikes I really like the Wiha not cheep but worth every penny.



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Old 07-10-12, 07:37 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BCRider View Post
The odd thing about having a torque wrench is that as you use it regularly you soon develop a sense for the correct torque and you'll find that you don't need it as much. It's fair to say that MOST regular wrench spinners only use their torque wrenches or torque screwdrivers for special applications where things need to be very closely matched or the risk of failure for even a slight over torqueing is high.

That said buying a decent but not top end model will do the job and last you for years if decently cared for. So it's worth buying an OK brand for a little more than the very cheapest imports but I would not suggest going for Snap On or similar high priced stuff simply due to the cost.

The beam style are reputed to work well. The catch is that you need to locate your eyes directly over the needle or the parallax error can result in wildly wrong readings. But on a bicycle this is seldom an issue since they are light enough to reposition the bike so you CAN see directly onto the reading face. But if you ever plan on using it in automotive or motorcycle applications the click style are a LOT more useful. And they don't cost all that much more.
agree but i still tighten cranks with a torque wrench.
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Old 07-11-12, 01:26 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gege-Bubu View Post
Finally, I realized I could use a torque wrench on my bike maintenance. I was tightening all bike's bolts by hand so far, but I believe I overtighten them.
Question: How does a torque wrench prevent you from over tightening?? I'm just getting into the mechanics of bikes and trying to learn as I go??
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Old 07-11-12, 04:39 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Afdica View Post
Question: How does a torque wrench prevent you from over tightening?? I'm just getting into the mechanics of bikes and trying to learn as I go??
Assuming you stop when you get to the right torque (why else would you use a torque wrench?), the fastener will be adequately tight without being overtightened.
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Old 07-11-12, 04:49 PM   #12
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Yes..but how does one determine the right torque in order to avoid over tightening. The tendency ia always to tighten things up good.
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Old 07-11-12, 05:02 PM   #13
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http://bicycletutor.com/torque-specifications/
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Old 07-11-12, 05:06 PM   #14
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Thanks bobdell........your link places it all into proper perspective.
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Old 07-11-12, 08:45 PM   #15
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Those considering Snap-On should look at the Precision Instruments editions (same wrench, not badged Snap-On). I like the split-beam clicker for my "big" wrench, with one caveat: if you need to torque counterclockwise, you must be able to approach the item from the backside. The one scenario where this is actually a problem is when fastening a driveside pedal that only has a hex fitting, and no wrench flats. Unlike a conventional clicker, split-beam doesn't have to be zeroed out when idle, and dialing in your desired torque is lightning-fast.

For my low-range wrench, I like the Precision Instruments dial-indicating model with a 0-150 inch-pound range, combined with a Titan inline ratchet head. Dial self-zeros and gives real-time readout of the applied torque, which can be handy if something's about to strip its threads... you get some warning signs (torque starts dropping).

If I were a home user, however, I'd go with some beam wrenches. Self-zeroing, continuous readout, fairly cheap, tough, and the calibration is the spring-rate of the beam's metal itself. If the zero point needs adjustment, just tweak the pointer to aim at zero on the scale. Done.
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Old 07-11-12, 09:39 PM   #16
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Yes..but how does one determine the right torque in order to avoid over tightening. The tendency ia always to tighten things up good.
note how many components come with torque specs engraved, these days..
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Old 07-11-12, 10:07 PM   #17
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....or cheap out and use the turn of the nut method
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