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Old 07-11-12, 12:34 PM   #1
daire
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Cold setting frame in Portland

Hi,

I have an old frame I'm looking to put more gears on. I need to spread the frame a little but have no experience in doing this. Does anyone know a repair shop in Portland that would be willing and has experience to help with this?

Thanks,.
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Old 07-11-12, 12:37 PM   #2
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How much is , "a little?"
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Old 07-11-12, 12:54 PM   #3
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If it is to go from 126mm to 130mm spacing I really wouldn't bother with doing this. It is easy enough to spread the chainstays when putting the wheel on. Unless you are taking that wheel off alot, it just isn't necessary. If it is to move from the older 120mm to 130mm that is something different. I would look to find a shop that has done that procedure many times, as getting the alignment right and making sure you don't pop the rear brake mount is highly desirable.
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Old 07-11-12, 12:54 PM   #4
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The home technique is well explained on Sheldon Brown's website.

The trick is to do it on one side and measure the gap until it's spread by half the amount you want to reach. Then bend the other side to complete the spread out to the amount needed. By doing half to each side and measuring it you ensure that the final spread is as aligned as it was before you started.
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Old 07-11-12, 01:58 PM   #5
daire
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I'm going from 125mm to 135mm. I looked at Sheldon Brown's article but I'm worried about keeping the forkends aligned.
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Old 07-11-12, 03:02 PM   #6
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I hope you mean an old STEEL frame.
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Old 07-12-12, 06:39 AM   #7
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Community Cycle Center on N Alberta spread a frame (and fork) for me. Cost $35. I don't know if they are particularly good/bad at it but the results were good in my case.
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Old 07-12-12, 09:37 AM   #8
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If you want to tackle it you can always have the shop align the dropouts afterward.
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Old 07-12-12, 12:35 PM   #9
daire
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Yes steel.
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Old 07-12-12, 02:46 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daire View Post
I'm going from 125mm to 135mm. I looked at Sheldon Brown's article but I'm worried about keeping the forkends aligned.
And you're wise to worry about it.

I've only cold set one frame but when I did I went a touch over to allow me the allowance I needed to tweak the dropouts back to parallel. Doing so made the wheel easier to slip and and out.

If you don't feel you have a handle on the skills and procedure or you don't think the tools you have available will do the job then you're wise to find someone that can and does. But I'd suggest you spend a little time considering how you would do the job and what bits and pieces you could cobble together from construction wood to do the job. If you get a good feel for the procedure and begin feeling a little more confident then go for it. Otherwise take what you learned here and go around a few shops asking about doing the work. If you get a good feel for the guy based on Sheldon's article and our posts go with them. If not keep looking around.
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