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  1. #1
    Constant tinkerer FastJake's Avatar
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    Double eyelets pulling through? Is this ok? Old used Mavic rims

    I just finished building up a beautiful tri-color/Mavic OR10 wheelset. Before even gluing the tires on I notice a few of the eyelets look like they're pulling through. I've attached a picture of the worst one. Is this something to worry about? Can double eyelets pull through? I used 14/16/14 butted spokes and didn't go crazy on the tension by any means, since they're 36x3 and I'm a lightweight.

    I fear I may soon be posting a thread about how to "fix" broken eyelets


    IMG_1331.jpgIMG_1332.jpg
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  2. #2
    Foward Leaning Attitude rithem's Avatar
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    that stinks not so sure that's fixable ... do you know what your tension is. It also may not be a big deal.

  3. #3
    Constant tinkerer FastJake's Avatar
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    No, I don't yet have a tension meter (don't kill me...) but I've build up at least a dozen wheels now successfully and never ran into this.

    A thought I had - is the eyelet simply stretched? Since it's a double eyelet I don't think there's as much of a risk of cracking the rim itself.
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  4. #4
    Senior Member mrrabbit's Avatar
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    That's actually pretty common on older rims from the 70s and 80s. Also common is the rim has a slight curve in the centerline - basically the eyelet won't sit flush with the rim all the way around. Typical with KinLin ADHN eyeletted rims for example.

    =8-)

    Thing to remember is the that the pressure is on the other side where the nipple seats itself...if that fails - then the eyelet as a whole has failed.

    =8-)
    4000+ wheels built since 1984...

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  5. #5
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    That looks to me like an eyelet that is not quite sitting flush, not an eyelet that is pulling through. If there are cracks in the rim around the eyelet (on the outside or inside under the rim tape) then the rim is done. If there are no cracks then it is probably safe to ride.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrrabbit View Post
    That's actually pretty common on older rims from the 70s and 80s.
    +1, it's par for the course on rims of this vintage. The double eyelet system requires that the inner cup hangs from the upper rim surface in order to transfer load. With the tolerances of the rims of that era, that meant that some of the cups ended up above the lower (hub side) wall of the rim, and therefore the rivet wouldn't be closed to zero clearance.

    When the rim is built, the assembly settles inward under spoke load causing what you see. All it means is that the eyelet is doing it's job. OTOH, it caused concern in the market place because it looks wrong (even though it isn't) so most makers started being super diligent about eyelets being fully settled against the hub side wall of the rim, which also means that the inner cup doesn't transfer load to the upper wall as effectively.

    Another case of presentation trumping function.
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  7. #7
    AEO
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    Senior Member AEO's Avatar
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    That's not what a pulled through eyelet looks like.
    Food for thought: if you aren't dead by 2050, you and your entire family will be within a few years from starvation. Now that is a cruel gift to leave for your offspring. ;)
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  8. #8
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    I have a nice 80's vintage eyeletted rim just like yours. On my rim, 2 or 3 of the eyelets actually have lost the bottom half of the eyelet, the visible portion. The structurial portion is still fine and intact, the part that is inside the rim and actually holds the spoke in place. Its just that the bottom half of the eyelet broke off and doesn't look at nice but the rim is still fine and strong as ever.

    I wouldn't worry one bit about your issue.

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