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  1. #1
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    Building a Wheelset for SON Dynohub

    Figured I would jump into the deep end of the pool and build myself a wheelset for my year-round commuter cross bike. It will use a SON dynohub.

    My problem is I am unfamiliar with all the various products out there, especially rims. I could use some suggestions on what components to look at.

    I want to do this right with good components. I'm aiming for strength and reliability.

    The bike is a Specialized Tricross (10-speed rear end) with disc brakes (Avid BB5). I weigh ~180 lbs and frequently carry 20+ lbs of groceries in a rear basket. I ride ~4-5k miles a year in all weather on some chipseal, so tires are ~35 mm 700c's. Unless there is a good reason to use prestas, I'm thinking I'd like to go with schrader valves.

    Weight is not a big deal (the bike weighs 36 lbs), but I do like to ride fast.

    I was thinking of some deepish rims, maybe 36-hole (?) to handle the weight on bumps at speed. I dunno. The rear hub is another thing I could use input on. I was looking at Shimano Dura-Ace or Phil Wood. I like the idea of a hub I can service and will last.

    Any thoughts? What would you put together given those parameters?

  2. #2
    Senior Member mechBgon's Avatar
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    For the rear hub, I nominate a DT Swiss 350. The star-ratchet system is reliable and absurdly easy to service, you don't even have to remove the cassette (in fact, the cassette helps pop the freehub body off for servicing). You can also buy new endcaps to change the axle to 135mm later if you want.

    Given your usage and the tire size range you're planning on, I'd go with the Velocity Dyad. They're affordable, pretty strong (used on tandems), not absurdly heavy (480 grams), and a suitable width for your tires. You can even obtain them in Halo retroreflective powdercoat (it's not super-reflective, but hey).

  3. #3
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    for hubs i like the slx for cheap. dt 240 is a solid hub. rims velocity fusion. i also like dt rims

  4. #4
    Senior Member mrrabbit's Avatar
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    Rims

    700x25-28c

    DT Swiss TK 540
    Mavic A319s and A719s

    =8-)
    4000+ wheels built since 1984...

    Disclaimer:

    1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
    2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
    3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
    4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
    5. My all time favorite book is:

    Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life

  5. #5
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    have 2 disc SON dynohubs 1 for 6 bolt disc mount, 26" wheel

    and the other uses center-lock spline fitted discs this is in a 20" wheel


    I prefer anodized black , as i find I'm not a polisher after all the years ..

    I have a R'off hub in the back of both.. 32 hole..

  6. #6
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    I would go for the shimano rear. http://bike.shimano.com/media/techdo...9830708781.pdf The Mavic 319"s are a good buy.

  7. #7
    Old fart JohnDThompson's Avatar
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    For a year-round commuter, I'd avoid a derailleur system and use an internally geared rear hub instead. These are available from various manufacturers in 2 to 14 speed systems, depending on your needs and how much you're willing to spend. Some models also incorporate all-weather drum brakes into the hub.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
    For a year-round commuter, I'd avoid a derailleur system and use an internally geared rear hub instead. These are available from various manufacturers in 2 to 14 speed systems, depending on your needs and how much you're willing to spend. Some models also incorporate all-weather drum brakes into the hub.
    Yeah, I'd like to put in a Rohloff, but they are a bit spendy for the moment.

    Thanks for all the info, guys. No Phil Wood hub recommendations?

  9. #9
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    I like Phil's freewheel hubs.. no complicated free-hub mech .
    but I jumped from friction shifting 7 speeds to IGH bikes ,
    rather than follow the forced march to 8, then 9, now 10&11 'speeds'.

    (used R'off hubs on E-Pay are less in cost than new..]

    Foul weather gear , my Cape hides the gear shifter windows
    that do something for the index-derailleur consumer..

    rotary, linear, 1 is followed by ratio-set 2,
    and so forth , no 2 handed double shifts..
    Last edited by fietsbob; 08-19-12 at 04:23 PM.

  10. #10
    Senior Member mechBgon's Avatar
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    By the way, this is what's in the DT Swiss star-ratchet system: http://www.rouesartisanales.com/uplo...t-system-1.jpg No tiny fragile parts, just a couple big strong ratchet rings with a spring on each side. You can pop the system open for inspection and lubrication by hand, or a 40mm headset wrench works great. Don't overpack them, you're not going for anywhere near a 100% grease fill in there.

    Bonus: they're audible enough to serve as a pedestrian-alert device when coasting

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
    By the way, this is what's in the DT Swiss star-ratchet system: http://www.rouesartisanales.com/uplo...t-system-1.jpg No tiny fragile parts, just a couple big strong ratchet rings with a spring on each side. You can pop the system open for inspection and lubrication by hand, or a 40mm headset wrench works great. Don't overpack them, you're not going for anywhere near a 100% grease fill in there.

    Bonus: they're audible enough to serve as a pedestrian-alert device when coasting
    And they are a poor design because the right axle support beaing is inboard. The star ratchet solved a problem that did not exist. The old Onyx was their best hub design. http://www.dtswiss.com/Resources/Old..._20070404.aspx

  12. #12
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    Her is a good one, if you don't mind used. http://www.ebay.com/itm/DT-Swiss-Ony...item19d46b7c40

  13. #13
    Senior Member mechBgon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidad View Post
    And they are a poor design because the right axle support beaing is inboard.
    I've been working at an LBS since the star-ratchet system was first introduced, and never seen them have the slightest problem as a result of where the bearing is located. That includes ample numbers of Bontrager-branded DT Swiss hubs, since I'm currently at a Trek shop. They're a good hub.

  14. #14
    Insane Bicycle Mechanic Jeff Wills's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beezaur View Post
    Yeah, I'd like to put in a Rohloff, but they are a bit spendy for the moment.

    Thanks for all the info, guys. No Phil Wood hub recommendations?
    Phil cassette hubs are $400+ each. That'll buy a lot of "normal" Shimano hubs. If it's got disk brakes, you won't slow down much with a Dura-Ace hub I'd go with a Deore or Deore XT hub and overhaul it every year or two.
    Jeff Wills

    All my bikes.

  15. #15
    Senior Member mrrabbit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidad View Post
    And they are a poor design because the right axle support beaing is inboard. The star ratchet solved a problem that did not exist. The old Onyx was their best hub design. http://www.dtswiss.com/Resources/Old..._20070404.aspx
    The inboard bearing solution was primarily for straight through single dimension M10 axles with no exotic materials adjustment.

    Viewing the documentation for the newer 240s clearly shows an oversize axle through the entire hub shell and freehub from end cap to end cap. This effectively strengthens the axle thereby allowing a little leeway for a more inboard bearing.

    =8-)
    4000+ wheels built since 1984...

    Disclaimer:

    1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
    2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
    3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
    4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
    5. My all time favorite book is:

    Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrrabbit View Post
    The inboard bearing solution was primarily for straight through single dimension M10 axles with no exotic materials adjustment.

    Viewing the documentation for the newer 240s clearly shows an oversize axle through the entire hub shell and freehub from end cap to end cap. This effectively strengthens the axle thereby allowing a little leeway for a more inboard bearing.


    =8-)
    In other words a way to correct a poor design.

  17. #17
    Senior Member mrrabbit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by davidad View Post
    In other words a way to correct a poor design.
    If it constantly breaks requiring RMAs and recalls...it's bad design.

    However, if it works - then you are effectively arguing half-empty / half-full for all intensive purposes.

    =8-)

    My concern as a wheelbuilder is:

    1. Does it work?
    2. Does it follow general specs?
    3. Can I build it in a wheel, trued, tensioned and dished to my satisfaction?

    =8-)

    Also, understand the Phil did the same way back when first designing their hubs with beefy heavy oversized axles - to offset non-linear loads created by misaligned dropouts common to poorly maintained bikes - which held true later with increasing drive side spacings...

    =8-)
    4000+ wheels built since 1984...

    Disclaimer:

    1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
    2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
    3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
    4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
    5. My all time favorite book is:

    Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life

  18. #18
    Old fart JohnDThompson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beezaur View Post
    Yeah, I'd like to put in a Rohloff, but they are a bit spendy for the moment.
    Used Sturmey-Archer AW 3-speed hubs are abundant, inexpensive, and bulletproof. Even new SA hubs with drum brakes aren't that spendy.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDThompson View Post
    Used Sturmey-Archer AW 3-speed hubs are abundant, inexpensive, and bulletproof. Even new SA hubs with drum brakes aren't that spendy.
    Thanks. I looked at those, but I have lots of hills (7-8 mph with groceries) in between some flats (22+ mph).

    Sounds like a good idea for one or two of my older bikes though . . .

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