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  1. #1
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    Picking THE RIGHT new wheels

    Hello,

    I've done a lot of searching on the interent on this topic, just haven't gotting the answer i'm looking for.

    I'm 30 years old
    just under 100 kg (220#), but very fit.
    190 cm tall (just under 6' 3")
    My bike is a Batavus Boris. It is a Single speed "track" frame. But in reality it was meant to be a bike for cool people, that like the look of a fast bike, but use it for normal city riding.
    42/16 gearing
    700 x 25C Continental GP 4000s tires
    I use the bike fore commuting/ "racing" with friends/ getting around/ touring

    I ride my bike to work 2x per week, 17.1 km one way (10.63 miles)
    Today i broke my average speed record with 31.7 km/h (19.7 mph)
    THe commute is mostly flat with a few inclines, but nothing heavy. I do ride my bike on some more serieus climbs, and still manage to pass people uphill, so i'm content with that.

    The bike started out as standard, with a wide slightly bend "flat" handlebar, track pedals, upright seating position. So far i've put on a drop handlebar. Shimano PD-A530 pedals. Use Mavic shoes with the Shimano SPD system. Ride in a Cycling, close fitting outfit. Etc.

    I've only been cycling in such a sporting way for 4,5 months, so physically i think i can still improve a lot. I've just got it in my head i need (want) new wheels. I've really gotten the cycling bug and want to improve my speed every time i ride. Just cause it's fun.

    Currently the bike is on the standard wheels. 42mm high rims, with 32 round spokes. Front is laced radially, rear is laced X3 on both sides.

    On the internet there is a lot of debate, but also sound research that has been done on lightweight vs aero wheels. I myself like the idea of lighter weight. I've sone some weighing of my bike. As it stands it is 11.0 kg (24.2#) ready to ride. That includes 2 bottle cages, a purse with some tools and a spare tube.
    The front wheel weighs 1260 gram (2.78#)
    The rear wheels weighs 1400 gram (3.09#)

    I've calculated that with Mavic Open Pro rims i couls loose some 300 grams (0.66#) PER WHEEL, laced to my standard hubs.

    That would make a total weight loss of 600 grams (1.32#) for the set. Which to me sounds like a lot. It is 24% lighter on the front and 21.5% on the rear.

    So finally my real question.

    Should i keep my standard wheels with the 42mm high rim, (which are aero?)
    Go for the rebuild wheels with the Mavic Open pro, loosing 600 grams (1.32#)

    Keeping in mind my current average speeds and the hills i sometimes have to conquer, mostly riding solo.

    Thanks,
    Thanas

  2. #2
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    I too am a fan of light wheels, and use older rims even lighter than open pros, built with butted spokes for resiliency, so if given the choice of your older wheels or the ones you propose wouldn't hesitate to choose the lighter versions.

    But you're in a different situation. You already have a nice working pair of wheels and unless or until something happened, like a crash or pothole damage, I wouldn't cut them up. While everybody likes to upgrade and the industry depends on it, the reality is that the most important improvement you can make on a bike is the engine, and you're doing that already.

    There is another option if you really want a sweet pair of light wheels. Buy a new pair the way you want, keeping the originals intact. There will be little or no extra cost because the savings involved in buying a pre-built wheel from a good source is usually enough (often more) than enough to offset the cost of the hub. So by buying pre-built you can eat your cake and have it too.

    Having spare wheels is a very nice thing for a commuter bike. It gives you options if for example you're running a bit late one morning and find the tire flat just as you're leaving the house. Or you can mount different tires and have a good set for normal riding, and use the old set for rainy days.
    Last edited by FBinNY; 08-20-12 at 07:01 AM.
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  3. #3
    Member RyleyinSTL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thanas View Post
    ...But in reality it was meant to be a bike for cool people, that like the look of a fast bike, but use it for normal city riding
    Hilarious!

    As for new wheels...your current ones are defiantly super heavy. Given your general use for the bike "commuting, racing with friends, getting around, touring" I would say that aero wheels are unnecessary. A re-lace with Mavic Open Pro is a solid idea as they are strong and will give you a significant weight savings. You should notice this difference, particularly when accelerating. A ferther upgrade would be to also replace the hubs with something like DT Swiss. You would save even more weight and get smoother/easier rolling.
    ----
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  4. #4
    bike whisperer Kimmo's Avatar
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    Velocity Aeroheads are pretty light at close to 400g, would prolly handle your weight at 32h, look pretty cool compared to box section rims and come in all kinds of colours and even prints, and come in OC for a stronger rear (I'd use a 25mm tyre on the rear if I was you).

    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    You already have a nice working pair of wheels and unless or until something happened, like a crash or pothole damage, I wouldn't cut them up.
    I wouldn't cut them up either; I'd put the spokes, nipples and rims aside and at some point I'd build them back up better than they were originally built.

  5. #5
    Senior Member mrrabbit's Avatar
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    Open Pros are light weight racing clinchers...CXP-33s are light weight aero racing clinchers...

    Build to category - not to someone's personal recommendation or your own need to smooze...unless you have money to spare...


    Currently you have what are likely very heavy wheels...you want something a lot lighter but still up to the category of sport and light touring and commuting.

    1. Anything double wall.
    2. Single-eyelet or double eyelet or no eyelet but with 2.0mm to 2.5mm center line thickness if aero.
    3. 470g to 520g weight range.

    Mavic CXP-22
    Mavic Open Sport
    DT Swiss R520
    DT Swiss RR 465 (tad under...)
    Velocity DeepV
    KinLin XR-240
    KinLin XM-250
    KinLin MX4 (562g but semi-aero with single eyelets - my favorite budget mid-range single speed and light touring rim from KinLin for 700 x 25c)

    Those above will bring you wheel weight down considerably while still providing just enough beef to handle a heavy rider, rough commuting, etc...

    Don't toss your old wheels...and stick with the 700 x 25c tire size.

    =8-)
    4000+ wheels built since 1984...

    Disclaimer:

    1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
    2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
    3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
    4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
    5. My all time favorite book is:

    Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life

  6. #6
    Senior Member IthaDan's Avatar
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    What's your budget?

    For quality singlespeed/fixed wheels on the cheap (well, cheap enough anyway) check out the wabi offerings- http://www.wabicycles.com/GXwheels.html

    Shimano : Click :: Campy :: Snap :: SRAM : Bang

  7. #7
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    Some great advice here. Thank a lot so far.

    I'm thinking that for my budget, going with light weight is the way to go. I ride motorcycles also, and there, lightweight wheels are worth their weight in gold, because it transforms the performance of the bike. WIth a bicycle, the engine is the rider, so going lighter is definately smart.

    I recently went from Vittoria Rubino tires 700 x 23C, with Schwalbe tubes to Continental GP4000s 700 x 25c tires with Continental Supersonic tubes. And lost some 150 grams per wheel with that alone. And i had the feeling that really helped. Could be placebo. But loosing another 300 gram per wheel would mean a big difference.

    I actually have to do a lot of accelerating during my commute. Because of traffic, so lighter would definately make sense. I know with the right budget, i could have lightweight AND aero, but that is not what i want to spend.

    I've read an article about aero wheels. And between the best and worst, there was something like a 30 watt difference. AT 50 km/h! (31 mph!). With my size and weight, i'll only manage that on descends. Riding behind a moped/ scooter i've managed to maintain 39 km/h (19.3 mph) for some time. But drafting like that, aerodynamics play less of a role.

    Yes, lightweight is the way to go for me. Just have to figure out what rims i would use.

    Greetings,
    Thanas

  8. #8
    Senior Member mrrabbit's Avatar
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    Lighter weight circumference = greater acceleration response BUT loss of inertia.

    =8-)
    4000+ wheels built since 1984...

    Disclaimer:

    1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
    2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
    3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
    4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
    5. My all time favorite book is:

    Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life

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