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Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

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Old 08-26-12, 07:13 PM   #1
irkelvin
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Pedal Resistance Problem

I'm riding fixed with an profile imperial chainwheel, not sure if that matters. But I recently changed my wheelset and I have been experiencing an issue. When I put a good amount of the pressure on the pedals, and they would frequently just give way and I almost lose balance because of my legs suddenly jerking in the way that they were pushing the pedals. The crankarms would keep spinning but I wouldn't move. Can anyone tell me what the issue is?
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Old 08-26-12, 07:26 PM   #2
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20:1 odds that the lockring is somewhat loose so when you back off to stop the sprocket spins back against the lockring and jams there. It'll hold there and look and feel tight, but when you apply torque, it pulls off and rotates freely until it's tight. This can go on for a while until the lockring final comes off allowing the spocket to spin off, or you break your neck, whichever happens first.

You need to set the spocket correctly, here's how. Install the sprocket and tighten it with a chain whip as tight as you can. The best way is to brace the wheel in a corner and arrange the bar of the chain whip so you're pushing forward and down. The corner will hold the wheel so you can really tighten it. Not screw on the lockring, as set it tight buy not super tight.

Now, and this is the key part, find a steep hill and power up it, or do a hard sprint from a standing start to make sure the sprocket is torqued as tight as you'll ever torque it in the real world. Now slow down and stop without applying backforce on the cranks, and drive the lockring hard against the sprocket to lock it in place.

If you ever feel the least hint of slippage, loosen the lockring and repeat the sprint or hill climb process before resetting it.
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Old 08-26-12, 07:33 PM   #3
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Guess I better get my hands on a chain whip? Any recommendations if I don't have one?
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Old 08-26-12, 08:02 PM   #4
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Guess I better get my hands on a chain whip? Any recommendations if I don't have one?
You can get by without the chain whip, because the real tightening happens during the sprint or hill climb. The key is the sequence, torquing the spoket all the way home before setting the lockring against it.
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Old 08-26-12, 08:04 PM   #5
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Guess I better get my hands on a chain whip? Any recommendations if I don't have one?
Park makes a good one. You will also need a lockring spanner to properly tighten the lockring once the cog is tight. Remember, the lockring is left-hand threaded.
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Old 08-27-12, 08:08 AM   #6
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Guess I better get my hands on a chain whip? Any recommendations if I don't have one?
You can use the "Rotafix" method if you don't want to buy a chain whip.
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Old 08-28-12, 04:48 AM   #7
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Or you can make one with a bit of chain, a lump of steel plate, a drill and a chain tool.
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Old 08-28-12, 05:34 AM   #8
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Or you can make one with a bit of chain, a lump of steel plate, a drill and a chain tool.
Just make sure it's a substantial plate. I used a big shelf bracket to make my chainwhip because I had one lying around, and I sort of punched a wall when it bent and slipped off a fixed cog while I was trying to remove it.
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