Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 43
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    74
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Help! Trying to assemble bike, need some advice.

    Hello there,

    So my BD bike came in the mail today. I started a thread before about it: http://www.bikeforums.net/showthread...mble-this-bike

    However, it's arrived and I am unsure of how to proceed. First, when I spin the wheel that's attached to the bike, it appears that it needs truing. I called a LBS who said they would do it for 10-20$, so I thought great. But, then realized I don't have a tool to take my chain off. So I am going to order some more parts. Can you guide me in what I need?

    So far I have:

    set of crescent wrenches
    adjustable crescent wrench
    hex keys /allen wrenches
    15mm & 13mm cone wrenches

    Is this tool all I need for removal of the chain? http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...=ATVPDKIKX0DER

    -For a 32mm headset wrench, would you recommend having two so you can hold one nut while tightening the other?

    What does one need to true a wheel besides spoke wrenches? Can I do it while the wheels are attached to the bike? Do I need to remove the tire?

    Thanks so much for the help!
    Last edited by DScience; 08-27-12 at 02:01 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member JTGraphics's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    2,473
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You do not have to break chain to remove rear wheel.

    But you may want to take entire bike have them go thru it and fine tune it.
    BD bikes need to have all final adjustment done it is not done at BD before shipping thats your job when it arrives.
    It may not be fancy but it gets me were I need to go.
    http://www.jtgraphics.net/cyclist_bicycles.htm

  3. #3
    Bikaholic blamp28's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Western, Michigan
    My Bikes
    Trek Fuel 90, Giant OCR, Rans Screamer Tandem
    Posts
    1,467
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You will not need to break the chain to remove the wheel. Just move it forward in the dropouts and the chain will be loose enough to take off of the chainring.
    Trek Fuel XC MTB, Giant OCR Road Bike, Rans Screamer - Tandem

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    74
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by JTGraphics View Post
    You do not have to break chain to remove rear wheel.

    But you may want to take entire bike have them go thru it and fine tune it.
    BD bikes need to have all final adjustment done it is not done at BD before shipping thats your job when it arrives.
    Thanks! Would you mind explaining how you can remove the wheel?

    I know about the tuning, but I wanted to try and take my time and tune the rest myself. I am taking it slow, but it's a little too slow right now lol.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    74
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by blamp28 View Post
    You will not need to break the chain to remove the wheel. Just move it forward in the dropouts and the chain will be loose enough to take off of the chainring.
    Oh snap! Ok thanks, I am going to try it.

  6. #6
    Senior Member JTGraphics's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    2,473
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes thats all you need to do I now see its a fix gear so no need for all that tuneup stuff just adjust brakes and go have fun LOL
    It may not be fancy but it gets me were I need to go.
    http://www.jtgraphics.net/cyclist_bicycles.htm

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    74
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I appreciate all the replies. I got the wheel off, and brought it to a LBS for truing. I know the guy a little, and he checked them both on his stand and I could tell they needed it.

    Now, I would like to attach my handlebars, but don't have one or two 32mm wrenches. I am about to order two, is there any cheaper way to get them on and adjust properly?

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    74
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    OH OH!! Okay, so the stem had a weird contraption, and I stuck it in the bike and used an allen wrench to tighten it from the top of the stem, and it seemed like it totally secured it in place. I didn't even have to tighten the two 32mm neck nuts. Is this normal? Does this make sense to anyone?

  9. #9
    Banned.
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    My Bikes
    CCM Torino 76
    Posts
    937
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Yes. The two 32mm nuts are to adjust the headset bearings (the bearings on which the fork spins). That would be another $6 job you should ask the LBS to do, as you likely won't be needing to adjust those too often. An experienced bike repairist can usually do it with a large adjustable, of even a pair of channel-lock pliers or a pipe wrench. But the ability to do that depends on the configuration of the headset and what type of spacers are used.

    The headset bearings should be set so that the bars can spin freely (maybe with a teensy weensy bit of drag) and do not make any rattling noises when the front of the bike is dropped from ~6" onto the floor (with a properly inflated front tire).

  10. #10
    aka Tom Reingold noglider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    West Village, New York City
    My Bikes
    too many
    Posts
    18,809
    Mentioned
    45 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    You really really really should have the bike shop go over it and pay them for it. Learn how to adjust your bike after it's in proper shape. If you don't have them do it right the first time, it may never in proper tune. I bought a cheap bike from Nashbar, and everything was wrong. I happen to be a bike mechanic, so it wasn't a problem for me, but it seems like a disservice to sell bikes to average consumers and make it seem like they're complete bikes. They're not complete until they're properly assembled.
    Please email me rather than sending me a private message. My address is noglider@pobox.com

    Tom Reingold
    Residences: West Village, New York City and High Falls, NY
    Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

  11. #11
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    My Bikes
    Condor Fratello, Jack Parker steel single speed,
    Posts
    12
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by noglider View Post
    You really really really should have the bike shop go over it and pay them for it. Learn how to adjust your bike after it's in proper shape. If you don't have them do it right the first time, it may never in proper tune. I bought a cheap bike from Nashbar, and everything was wrong. I happen to be a bike mechanic, so it wasn't a problem for me, but it seems like a disservice to sell bikes to average consumers and make it seem like they're complete bikes. They're not complete until they're properly assembled.
    +1 to this.

    Although please don't let that scare you off bike mechanics! learning how your bike works is an important part of riding, and getting things wrong is a valuable way of learning how to do things right. We've got loads of free info for amateur bike mechanics like yourself over on our website (see sig). Forums like this one will become invaluable to you too.
    Free bicycle maintenance resource - http://www.madegood.org

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    74
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Thanks again everyone!

    So here's a little update:

    I can see where you guys are coming from, especially if I shelled out thousands for an expensive bike. But I also wanted to learn how to do this. I had such a horrible bike before this one, here it is:http://www.torkerusa.com/bikes/commute/2012-udistrict

    After a year with that bike, I needed something better. OMG, this thing is AMAZING. It rides so so so smooth. It's lighter then I could have ever imagined. And the lugged frame is solid.

    I did bring both wheels to a LBS to have them trued, which I am glad I did. I'm a little upset though. When I called he quoted me $10-$20, but when I got there he said $10-$25. But when I picked them up he charged me $35 flat which i'm sure he would have put the whole thing together for $60. Oh well.

    Anyway, I got the thing together. The breaks were hard because they came with really long cables and housing, so I cut those and the front brake works. However, I need some help with this one...

    **The brake works, but the brake pads don't touch the rims until the levers are almost totally engaged. But even then, the pads are not fully flush with the rim.** I've included pictures. I am not sure if I didn't tighten them enough or if I have something wrong. Any help would be appreciated.




    Here are the two pads fully engaged:


  13. #13
    Mechanic/Tourist
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Syracuse, NY
    My Bikes
    2008 Novara Randonee - love it. Would have more bikes if I had time to ride them all. Previous bikes: 1968 Motobecane Mirage, 1972 Moto Grand Jubilee (my fav), Jackson Rake 16, 1983 C'dale ST500.
    Posts
    4,797
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Two errors on the brakes:

    1. The front of the pads should touch the rim just slightly before the rear (toe in). The right pad in particular appears to be very poorly aligned to the rim. Careful bending of the caliper arms is the way to correct the mialignment.
    2. You have probably cut the brake housing down so far that it is preventing proper engagement of the brakes. It should have a slight bend even when fully engaged. When you apply the brake lever the cable is pulled up to actuate the right caliper but the housing has to travel down to actuate the left caliper. If the housing is too short that can't happen.

    I have a feeling you have kind of "winged it" for most of the assembly. Self-reliance is great but it needs to be tempered with the awareness of your limitations. If you have not done so please study the Park Tool and Sheldon Brown sites, as well as other resources so that you understand both how individual parts are properly adjusted and assembled and, more importantly, how things work and interact together. Even a single speed bike has multiple possible failure points. If you don't assemble correctly or fail to redo those items that tend to break in or loosen quickly they can cause damage, premature wear or even injury.
    Last edited by cny-bikeman; 08-27-12 at 09:40 PM.
    There's no such thing as a routine repair.

    Don't tell me what "should" be - either it is, it isn't, or do something about it.

    If you think I'm being blunt take it as a compliment - if I thought you were too weak to handle the truth or a strong opinion I would not bother.

    Please take the time to post clearly so we can answer quickly. All lowercase and multiple typos makes for a hard read. Thanks!

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    74
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by cny-bikeman View Post
    Two errors on the brakes:

    1. The front of the pads should touch the rim just slightly before the rear (toe in). The right pad in particular appears to be very poorly aligned to the rim. Careful bending of the caliper arms is the way to correct the mialignment.
    2. You have probably cut the brake housing down so far that it is preventing proper engagement of the brakes. It should have a slight bend even when fully engaged. When you apply the brake lever the cable is pulled up to actuate the right caliper but the housing has to travel down to actuate the left caliper. If the housing is too short that can't happen.

    I have a feeling you have kind of "winged it" for most of the assembly. Self-reliance is great but it needs to be tempered with the awareness of your limitations. If you have not done so please study the Park Tool and Sheldon Brown sites, as well as other resources so that you understand both how individual parts are properly adjusted and assembled and, more importantly, how things work and interact together. Even a single speed bike has multiple possible failure points. If you don't assemble correctly or fail to redo those items that tend to break in or loosen quickly they can cause damage, premature wear or even injury.

    I don't get why I appear to be "winging it". I mean, yes, I am building a bike for the first time. But, i've been doing research with the time I have right now and I am not just rushing it. BTW, just by pointing out exactly what was wrong, I was able to get it. The cable/housing is fine in length, the break was just not aligned properly. But after some messing it is nice and even now.

  15. #15
    bike whisperer Kimmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, Oz
    My Bikes
    copy/paste links: http://velospace.org/node/36949 http://velospace.org/node/47746 http://velospace.org/node/47747
    Posts
    6,828
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The pads are mounted too low on the rim; they're half off the braking surface. I think maybe you have right and left mixed up too.

    To get the toe-in right, I'm afraid the answer with road brakes is to tweak the calipers... and with short beefy arms like on modern road brakes, it's hard not to bend the spindle instead. Use an adjustable spanner.

    Or you could try to find some road pads with concave/vex washers...

  16. #16
    Mechanic/Tourist
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Syracuse, NY
    My Bikes
    2008 Novara Randonee - love it. Would have more bikes if I had time to ride them all. Previous bikes: 1968 Motobecane Mirage, 1972 Moto Grand Jubilee (my fav), Jackson Rake 16, 1983 C'dale ST500.
    Posts
    4,797
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DScience View Post
    I don't get why I appear to be "winging it".
    Quote Originally Posted by DScience View Post
    ....it appears that it needs truing.... But, then realized I don't have a tool to take my chain off. So I am going to order some more parts. Can you guide me in what I need?
    Quote Originally Posted by DScience View Post
    Thanks! Would you mind explaining how you can remove the wheel?
    I won't belabor the point beyond this - Not knowing that you can remove a wheel without breaking the chain, and then not understanding how to remove the wheel tells me two things. First, that you have not used the multiple written and video resources available that show you exactly how to do these procedures. Second, and more importantly, that you are not using observation and logic to figure out how things on a bicycle work. To me that means it likely you have overlooked some things that are important.

    There is a huge difference between things looking OK when you have the bike together and them being properliy tightened, aligned and adjusted. I'm not saying any of this to discourage you from working on your own bike, but rather out of concern for your satisfaction with the bike and again, for your safety.

    p.s. In looking more closely at the brake caliper (the part that actually does the braking) it appears it already comes with conical washers (next to the pad, on the inside of the brake arm) meant to aid in toeing, which would mean no bending is necessary. I carelessly overlooked that originally, which shows you that even very experienced people have to use a lot of care when working on a bike. Of course part of the problem is that I started working on bikes professionally when bending the arm was the only way to adjust toe-in. Nowadays the arms are often much beefier, so bending them is more difficult and actually not advisable.

    If your calipers do have washers that allow you to change the pad angle: Loosen the nut slightly that holds the pad in position. Put a couple of business cards under the back end of the pad, then grip the brake lever to tighten the pad down against the rim. Now tighten the nut fully. Do this for each pad.
    Last edited by cny-bikeman; 08-28-12 at 07:15 AM.
    There's no such thing as a routine repair.

    Don't tell me what "should" be - either it is, it isn't, or do something about it.

    If you think I'm being blunt take it as a compliment - if I thought you were too weak to handle the truth or a strong opinion I would not bother.

    Please take the time to post clearly so we can answer quickly. All lowercase and multiple typos makes for a hard read. Thanks!

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    25,419
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    This thread is a good illustration as to why a mechanically unknowing bike purchaser should never buy from Bike Direct or a similar on-line dealer. BD can be the source for decent bikes at low prices but for both safety and proper operation the owner must be competent to do the required adjustments or be willing to pay a local shop to do it for them.

  18. #18
    Senior Member JTGraphics's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    2,473
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    This thread is a good illustration as to why a mechanically unknowing bike purchaser should never buy from Bike Direct or a similar on-line dealer. BD can be the source for decent bikes at low prices but for both safety and proper operation the owner must be competent to do the required adjustments or be willing to pay a local shop to do it for them.
    +1
    It may not be fancy but it gets me were I need to go.
    http://www.jtgraphics.net/cyclist_bicycles.htm

  19. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    74
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    This thread is a good illustration as to why a mechanically unknowing bike purchaser should never buy from Bike Direct or a similar on-line dealer. BD can be the source for decent bikes at low prices but for both safety and proper operation the owner must be competent to do the required adjustments or be willing to pay a local shop to do it for them.
    Just in case any other people come here curious about purchasing a bike from BD, don't listen to the above statement. I am 100% happy, satisfied, thrilled, excited about the purchase I made! I feel like I got a really good deal, and I am in no way upset or feel like I got ripped off.

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    74
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Kimmo View Post
    The pads are mounted too low on the rim; they're half off the braking surface. I think maybe you have right and left mixed up too.

    To get the toe-in right, I'm afraid the answer with road brakes is to tweak the calipers... and with short beefy arms like on modern road brakes, it's hard not to bend the spindle instead. Use an adjustable spanner.

    Or you could try to find some road pads with concave/vex washers...
    Thanks for trying to help. I realized that the breaks really really need to be adjusted. I spent a lot of time on them and I feel like they are in a good position now.

    Quote Originally Posted by cny-bikeman View Post
    I won't belabor the point beyond this - Not knowing that you can remove a wheel without breaking the chain, and then not understanding how to remove the wheel tells me two things. First, that you have not used the multiple written and video resources available that show you exactly how to do these procedures. Second, and more importantly, that you are not using observation and logic to figure out how things on a bicycle work. To me that means it likely you have overlooked some things that are important.

    There is a huge difference between things looking OK when you have the bike together and them being properliy tightened, aligned and adjusted. I'm not saying any of this to discourage you from working on your own bike, but rather out of concern for your satisfaction with the bike and again, for your safety.


    p.s. In looking more closely at the brake caliper (the part that actually does the braking) it appears it already comes with conical washers (next to the pad, on the inside of the brake arm) meant to aid in toeing, which would mean no bending is necessary. I carelessly overlooked that originally, which shows you that even very experienced people have to use a lot of care when working on a bike. Of course part of the problem is that I started working on bikes professionally when bending the arm was the only way to adjust toe-in. Nowadays the arms are often much beefier, so bending them is more difficult and actually not advisable.

    If your calipers do have washers that allow you to change the pad angle: Loosen the nut slightly that holds the pad in position. Put a couple of business cards under the back end of the pad, then grip the brake lever to tighten the pad down against the rim. Now tighten the nut fully. Do this for each pad.
    I'm grateful that you took some time and tried to actually explain to me about the bike.

    But honestly guys, one of the most disappointing things about my experience the last few days is the total lack of encouragement from people who have responded to my posts!

    You have NO IDEA how many videos, online tutorials, old forum posts, real people from LBS, that I have studied to try and gather information. And I continue to do so. And about the logic? The bikes are NOTHING CLOSE TO LOGICAL. This bike is one of the most illogical things I have ever used. Want logical? Learn how an action potential is generated in a neuron.


    Anyway...thanks to those (few) who tried to be supportive.

    You can close this thread now because it's useless, unless you want to encourage some new comers to change their mind about learning the ropes of bicycle maintenance and scare them away.

  21. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    74
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by JTGraphics View Post
    +1
    I love my bike! So I feel bad for anyone you guys convince to go waste their money on an overpriced POS from a local bike shop, which is what I did one year ago.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    85
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DScience View Post
    I'm grateful that you took some time and tried to actually explain to me about the bike.

    But honestly guys, one of the most disappointing things about my experience the last few days is the total lack of encouragement from people who have responded to my posts!

    You have NO IDEA how many videos, online tutorials, old forum posts, real people from LBS, that I have studied to try and gather information. And I continue to do so. And about the logic? The bikes are NOTHING CLOSE TO LOGICAL. This bike is one of the most illogical things I have ever used. Want logical? Learn how an action potential is generated in a neuron.
    If you can't tell simply by looking at it that removing the wheel and chain on a fixed gear bicycle is as simple as loosening the skewer and moving the wheel forward in the dropouts, people are going to question (a) your basic mechanical aptitude, and (b) your sanity in trying to do an initial setup yourself. People online certainly want to help new cyclists, but you have to realize that it is a lot easier to answer a very specific question than "how do I put this bike together?" The reason that you got referred to Sheldon Brown and Park Tool is that those guys already explain how to do most of the basic things better than any of us can. That's called "help." What they don't answer are the questions like "Well, I just used the wrong size allan key and managed to drop the expander all the way down into my steerer tube. Doh. What's the easiest way to get it out?"

    With that being said, I will give you a tip that might help you with one of your questions - wheel truing. Provided your brake pads are actually aligned correctly, and your wheel isn't too far off true, this works pretty well to "ghetto true" a wheel. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svMMaGMsIMw

    For the love of everything holy, tip your saddle down to somewhere approaching level. And if you're going to only run a front brake, take the back brake lever off.
    Last edited by OldManRiley; 08-28-12 at 10:14 PM.
    Steel is real.

  23. #23
    bike whisperer Kimmo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Melbourne, Oz
    My Bikes
    copy/paste links: http://velospace.org/node/36949 http://velospace.org/node/47746 http://velospace.org/node/47747
    Posts
    6,828
    Mentioned
    8 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DScience View Post
    Thanks for trying to help. I realized that the breaks really really need to be adjusted. I spent a lot of time on them and I feel like they are in a good position now.
    If that position is where they're at in the photos, you're dead wrong and should listen to someone with a clue. And they're brakes.

    Quote Originally Posted by DScience View Post
    And about the logic? The bikes are NOTHING CLOSE TO LOGICAL. This bike is one of the most illogical things I have ever used. Want logical? Learn how an action potential is generated in a neuron.
    Uh, bikes are far more amenable to logic than something as complex as a neuron. Once over a certain complexity threshold, something perfectly logical can seem completely illogical, even in the face of sustained attempts to understand; exhibit A: computers. The interrelating factors you're dealing with on a bike are generally no more than a mere handful, so you don't get emergent complexity. I guarantee that anything seemingly illogical occurring on a bike is down to a simple failure of observation.

  24. #24
    Mechanic/Tourist
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Syracuse, NY
    My Bikes
    2008 Novara Randonee - love it. Would have more bikes if I had time to ride them all. Previous bikes: 1968 Motobecane Mirage, 1972 Moto Grand Jubilee (my fav), Jackson Rake 16, 1983 C'dale ST500.
    Posts
    4,797
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Kimmo View Post
    I guarantee that anything seemingly illogical occurring on a bike is down to a simple failure of observation.
    +++ Thank you, Kimmo.
    There's no such thing as a routine repair.

    Don't tell me what "should" be - either it is, it isn't, or do something about it.

    If you think I'm being blunt take it as a compliment - if I thought you were too weak to handle the truth or a strong opinion I would not bother.

    Please take the time to post clearly so we can answer quickly. All lowercase and multiple typos makes for a hard read. Thanks!

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    25,419
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DScience View Post
    Just in case any other people come here curious about purchasing a bike from BD, don't listen to the above statement. I am 100% happy, satisfied, thrilled, excited about the purchase I made! I feel like I got a really good deal, and I am in no way upset or feel like I got ripped off.
    You missed my point completely. BD can provide a decent bike at a low price. However, they always require some assembly and often require a lot of adjustments to work properly. Also, there have been enough reports of missing or incorrect parts that the purchaser has to know what they are doing or be willing to pay someone who does. I'm not saying don't buy from BD, but they are not for the mechanical novice who doesn't know what they don't know.

    You may be happy either because you lucked out or know how to set the bike up to work properly. Many BD customers are not so lucky or knowledgable.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •