Advertise on Bikeforums.net



User Tag List

Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    5,179
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Do you have this tool? Need info on handle dimensions.

    I would like to know the width of the handle of the following pedal wrench:




    I know it seems like an odd question, so let me explain: I have a carbon steel pipe that I use to increase the torque of some of my bicycle tools - like my BB tool, for instance. It's important that the handle fits inside the pipe somewhat snugly.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Rochelle, NY
    My Bikes
    too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
    Posts
    22,454
    Mentioned
    68 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    the photo seems to be taken close to straight on, and has little or no perspective taper. So measure the width of the 13mm (or 15mm) slot in the picture and use it to establish scale, then measure the width of the handle, and adjust for the real value. With a bit of care you should know to within a millimeter or two.

    If you're lucky you'll have a fairly decisive answer, but if it's borderline, you'll have to await confirmation by an actual measurement.
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  3. #3
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    5,179
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    the photo seems to be taken close to straight on, and has little or no perspective taper. So measure the width of the 13mm (or 15mm) slot in the picture and use it to establish scale, then measure the width of the handle, and adjust for the real value. With a bit of care you should know to within a millimeter or two.

    If you're lucky you'll have a fairly decisive answer, but if it's borderline, you'll have to await confirmation by an actual measurement.
    Thanks, but that's how I once almost got the wrong size frame.

    I'll just wait for the right man to make an appearance.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Oklahoma
    My Bikes
    Trek 5500, Colnago C-50
    Posts
    9,201
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    You shouldn't need a cheater bar for a pedal wrench.

  5. #5
    Senior Member JReade's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    1,213
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Al1943 View Post
    You shouldn't need a cheater bar for a pedal wrench.
    I'd like to introduce you to a few pedals that are very stubborn.
    Jesse

  6. #6
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    5,179
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I'm still hoping that an actual owner will make an appearance.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    My Bikes
    '''96 Litespeed Catalyst, '05 Litespeed Firenze, '06 Litespeed Tuscany, '12 Surly Pacer, All are 3x8,9 or 10. It is hilly around here!
    Posts
    26,149
    Mentioned
    13 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by JReade View Post
    I'd like to introduce you to a few pedals that are very stubborn.
    There is no reason for it but I've also run across pedals that must have been installed with an air impact wrench set to "extra tight". I guess that's why Park's pedal wrench is so big.

  8. #8
    Senior Member vredstein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    My Bikes
    '02 Lemond Buenos Aires, '98 Fuji Touring w/ Shimano Nexus premium, '06 Jamis Nova 853 cross frame set up as commuter, '03 Fuji Roubaix Pro 853 back up training bike
    Posts
    704
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    There is no reason for it but I've also run across pedals that must have been installed with an air impact wrench set to "extra tight". I guess that's why Park's pedal wrench is so big.
    Other than providing extra torque, it's nice to have a tool that's longer than the cranks so your hands clear the bottom bracket. This comes up when you're installing or removing pedals by rotating the cranks rather than turning the wrench.
    If the OP uses a cheater pipe that's too thick, the pipe will be rubbing the crank arm.
    "See, it's not that getting wet is a big deal. Really, it's what you're getting wet with.
    Fenders....because it's probably urine."
    Bike Snob NYC

  9. #9
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Beaufort, South Carolina, USA and surrounding islands.
    My Bikes
    Cannondale R500, Motobecane Messenger
    Posts
    8,522
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Al1943 View Post
    You shouldn't need a cheater bar for a pedal wrench.
    How much salt air is in Oklahoma? Cheater bars are routine for pedal wrenches here on the coast.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Rochelle, NY
    My Bikes
    too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
    Posts
    22,454
    Mentioned
    68 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by vredstein View Post
    If the OP uses a cheater pipe that's too thick, the pipe will be rubbing the crank arm.
    Regardless of the application, nobody with an ounce of common sense fits the cheater pipe until adding final torque, so it's only there for a few degrees of motion.
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,291
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    Regardless of the application, nobody with an ounce of common sense fits the cheater pipe until adding final torque, so it's only there for a few degrees of motion.
    With a pedal wrench it's 'getting it off' that requires the extra torque. I've run into a few where the pedal required a lot of torque for several complete turns.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    New Rochelle, NY
    My Bikes
    too many bikes from 1967 10s (5x2)Frejus to a Sumitomo Ti/Chorus aluminum 10s (10x2), plus one non-susp mtn bike I use as my commuter
    Posts
    22,454
    Mentioned
    68 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by dscheidt View Post
    With a pedal wrench it's 'getting it off' that requires the extra torque. I've run into a few where the pedal required a lot of torque for several complete turns.
    I've run into a few of those over the years, but if I'm needing lots of torque, I can't use the quick spin the crank method. It's one or the other, spin the cranks or use a cheater bar. But I must have a limited imagination because I can't see a situation where I'd be concerned with cheater bar/crank arm clearance, which is the point I was making in my prior post.
    FB
    Chain-L site

    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  13. #13
    Senior Member vredstein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona
    My Bikes
    '02 Lemond Buenos Aires, '98 Fuji Touring w/ Shimano Nexus premium, '06 Jamis Nova 853 cross frame set up as commuter, '03 Fuji Roubaix Pro 853 back up training bike
    Posts
    704
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    I've run into a few of those over the years, but if I'm needing lots of torque, I can't use the quick spin the crank method. It's one or the other, spin the cranks or use a cheater bar. But I must have a limited imagination because I can't see a situation where I'd be concerned with cheater bar/crank arm clearance, which is the point I was making in my prior post.
    The first pic shows a wrench similar to the OP. Imagine a pipe fitted 3/4 of the way up the handle. No room. The second pic shows a dedicated Park wrench (an older one with a medium length, not the newer one which is quite a bit longer.) The thick part of the handle is close, and a cheater pipe would certainly be much thicker and closer.
    I've also run into pedals that need a lot of torque to unfasten, probably more torque possible with a short handled wrench. Fortunately, I'm provided with a Park wrench with an sufficiently long handle.
    After looking at the OP's wrench, it looks like it might be offset, unless that's a trick of the lighting in the pic.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by vredstein; 08-29-12 at 12:17 AM.
    "See, it's not that getting wet is a big deal. Really, it's what you're getting wet with.
    Fenders....because it's probably urine."
    Bike Snob NYC

  14. #14
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    5,179
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Welp, looks like I'm not buying this tool, then. This purchase decision is entangled with the purchase of a few other tools and bike components, so basically I'll also buy from an entirely different supplier who sells a different set of tools including the pedal wrench.

  15. #15
    Carpe Velo Yo Spiff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    My Bikes
    2000 Bianchi Veloce, '88 Trek 900, '88 Schwinn Prologue, '92 Schwinn Crosscut, '03 Diamondback Tandem, '94 Yokota Grizzly Peak
    Posts
    2,502
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I had to extend the handle of a crank remover recently when replacing my bottom bracket and crankarm wouldn't budge. I simply zip-tied a steel seatpost to the handle of the wrench. Had to use a lot of zip ties to get a solid connection, and it doesn't look elegant, but it worked nicely. No concern about if it would fit inside.
    2000 Bianchi Veloce, '88 Schwinn Prologue, '88 Trek 900, '92 Trek T100, 2000 Rans Tailwind

  16. #16
    Senior Member DieselDan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Beaufort, South Carolina, USA and surrounding islands.
    My Bikes
    Cannondale R500, Motobecane Messenger
    Posts
    8,522
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    Regardless of the application, nobody with an ounce of common sense fits the cheater pipe until adding final torque, so it's only there for a few degrees of motion.
    If you are using a cheater bar to install anything, you're doing it wrong and should consider a new career path. We aren't torquing cylinder heads on a Caterpillar diesel, just pedals to a crank.
    Bikes use brakes to stop.

    If your bike has breaks, don't ride it.

  17. #17
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    5,179
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by DieselDan View Post
    If you are using a cheater bar to install anything, you're doing it wrong and should consider a new career path. We aren't torquing cylinder heads on a Caterpillar diesel, just pedals to a crank.
    Of course, I only need the extra torque when removing components (pedals, for instance), not when installing.

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,024
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A small crescent wrench with a cheater bar or a hammer seems to work for me.

    The pedal wrench does look nice though.

  19. #19
    Certified Bike Brat Burton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec
    Posts
    4,203
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    The pedal wrench you're looking at is a Shimano Pro Tool Pedal Wrench. Handle width is a continuous 30.1mm x 18.0mm across the widest part of the oval cross section. The real issue is the length. Its only 23cm long - perfect for pedal INSTALLATION, but much, much shorter than either the Pedros or Park Professional Shop Versions - neither of which I've ever needed to use a cheater bar with for seized pedal REMOVAL.
    Last edited by Burton; 08-29-12 at 07:27 PM.

  20. #20
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    NW,Oregon Coast
    My Bikes
    7
    Posts
    3,219
    Mentioned
    47 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    I took my pair of chain wrenches , and added a short piece of steel tube.
    back when freewheels were actually serviceable..
    and ovalized tube just enough to jam over the 2 pieces of hot rolled steel flat bar
    the chain whips were riveted to..

    squeeze the tube till it fits..

  21. #21
    Asi
    Asi is offline
    Engineer Asi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Bucharest, Romania, Europe
    My Bikes
    1989 Krapf (with Dura-ace) road bike, 1973 Sputnik (made by XB3) road bike , 1961 Peugeot fixed gear, 2010 Trek 4400
    Posts
    489
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    A shop use pedal wrench is about 300mm long (about a foot).

    Also, never push the wrench, but pull it! When it gets loose you would encounter a sudden twist on great angle. If you push it, your fingers/hand might hit the chainstay, chain, the crank itself, etc. It almost always rip some skin away. Always pull on wrenches and never push.

  22. #22
    Sir Fallalot wroomwroomoops's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Helsinki, Finland
    Posts
    5,179
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by Burton View Post
    The pedal wrench you're looking at is a Shimano Pro Tool Pedal Wrench. Handle width is a continuous 30.1mm x 18.0mm across the widest part of the oval cross section. The real issue is the length. Its only 23cm long - perfect for pedal INSTALLATION, but much, much shorter than either the Pedros or Park Professional Shop Versions - neither of which I've ever needed to use a cheater bar with for seized pedal REMOVAL.
    Thank you sir. Could you kindly also tell me the width of the steel core of the handle?

  23. #23
    Certified Bike Brat Burton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Montreal, Quebec
    Posts
    4,203
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quote Originally Posted by wroomwroomoops View Post
    Thank you sir. Could you kindly also tell me the width of the steel core of the handle?
    Steel handle is 24mm wide x 4.25mm thick. But would like to restate that the length is only about 1/2 the overall length of a Park Tool Pro Pedal Wrench or a Pedros Pro Pedal Wrench.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •