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  1. #1
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    new windsor with a brake squeak

    So I had my windsore dover 1.0 about a week now doing minor adjustments. What ever I try I can not get the rear brake from squeaking. The front was a little squeaky but got that to go away. I tried cleaning the outer rim with MS. Maybe it's the brake pads them self? There Tektro brakes I really didn't think I would get any issues. Overall it's a nice bike just working out the bugs.

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    Clean the rims with soap and water and rinse thoroughly. You don't want any oily residue like MS leaves.. Then see if the pads are "toed in", that is are the leading edges angled slightly inward. If they are not, they should be.

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    Kool stop pads are the best. Run some 320 sandpaper around the rims the use 220 on the pads to clean them.

  4. #4
    Bianchi Goddess Bianchigirll's Avatar
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    Are the pads toed in correctly?
    Last edited by Bianchigirll; 09-16-12 at 07:56 PM.
    Bianchis '87 Sport SX, '90 Proto (2), '91 Boarala 'cross, '93 Project 3, '88 Trofeo, '86 Volpe, '89 Axis, '79 Mixte SOLD, '99 Mega Pro XL Ti, '97 Ti Megatube, , '90 something Vento 603,

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    Quote Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
    Clean the rims with soap and water and rinse thoroughly. You don't want any oily residue like MS leaves.. Then see if the pads are "toed in", that is are the leading edges angled slightly inward. If they are not, they should be.
    I did re clean them. Didn't really notice any oil residue. I tried moving my brake pads in all different places still squeaks. I don't know what you mean by toed in. I moved them to the upper part of the rim lower part in the center. Tried turning them a little still squeaks Its frustrating.

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    This is the windsore 3.0 I have the 1.0 No disk brakes.

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    Bianchi Goddess Bianchigirll's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg T View Post
    This is the windsore 3.0 I have the 1.0 No disk brakes.
    I realized that after I reread the OPs post the third time

    Last edited by Bianchigirll; 09-16-12 at 08:07 PM.
    Bianchis '87 Sport SX, '90 Proto (2), '91 Boarala 'cross, '93 Project 3, '88 Trofeo, '86 Volpe, '89 Axis, '79 Mixte SOLD, '99 Mega Pro XL Ti, '97 Ti Megatube, , '90 something Vento 603,

    Others but still loved,; '80 RIGI, '80 Batavus Professional, '87 Cornelo, '86 Bertoni (sold), '09 Motobecane SS, '98 Hetchins M.O., '09 K2 Mainframe, '89 Trek 2000, '?? Jane Doe (still on the drawing board), '90ish Haro Escape

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    Quote Originally Posted by deacon mark View Post
    Kool stop pads are the best. Run some 320 sandpaper around the rims the use 220 on the pads to clean them.
    I thought of doing this I did the rims with 800 grit maybe that's too fine of sandpaper. I will try this method I have herd of it.

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    800 too fine I use that to buff out guitar finishes

  10. #10
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    Most modern brakes have curved washers that allow you to change the angle of the brake pads. Loosen each pad, put 1-2 business cards under the rear edge and tighten the pad down, making sure it's aligned well with the rim. The resulting "toe-in" may well cure the squeak. Lack of toe-in is one of the most common causes of brake noise. Probably not an issue with a newer bike but it's also important to make sure the pivot is not loose, allowing the arms to flex forward and back. I w ould use any kind of abrasive as a last resort, particularly on the rims. It's not wise to do something just because you've "heard of it."

    p.s. with older bikes one has to physically bend the lower part of the brake arm where the pad attaches in order to toe-in the pads.
    Last edited by cny-bikeman; 09-17-12 at 07:41 AM.
    There's no such thing as a routine repair.

    Don't tell me what "should" be - either it is, it isn't, or do something about it.

    If you think I'm being blunt take it as a compliment - if I thought you were too weak to handle the truth or a strong opinion I would not bother.

    Please take the time to post clearly so we can answer quickly. All lowercase and multiple typos makes for a hard read. Thanks!

  11. #11
    30 YR Wrench BikeWise1's Avatar
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    What you are hearing is intermittent slipping and gripping that is occurring in a range audible to humans. The goal is to tune this to an inaudible frequency. As others have stated, toeing the pads and cleaning the interface can help, but often, there's so much slop in cheap brakes mounted to cheap frames that there are certain conditions, i.e. high humidity, where they are going to make noise no matter what.

    Good luck.

  12. #12
    coprolite fietsbob's Avatar
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    Try , after getting the pad to hit the rim square on , taking off the Mold-release,
    slick surface of the brake shoes with sandpaper face out , between the rim and brake pad.

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    "there's so much slop in cheap brakes mounted to cheap frames"

    Are you saying my bike is too cheap?

  14. #14
    30 YR Wrench BikeWise1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg T View Post
    "there's so much slop in cheap brakes mounted to cheap frames"

    Are you saying my bike is too cheap?
    You are aware that the bike you purchased is at a quality level barely above that found at places like Walmart?

  15. #15
    Saving gas on my commute Scooby214's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikeWise1 View Post
    You are aware that the bike you purchased is at a quality level barely above that found at places like Walmart?
    The Bikes Direct bike I purchased last winter is a definite step up in comparison to Wal-Mart bikes. The frame is lighter, the components are better, and the bike is available in four frame sizes. Most Wal-Mart bikes are only sold in the store in one size.

    I have a riding friend that only recently switched from her Wal-Mart GMC Denali to a new bike. Her bike was very difficult to keep the derailleurs shifting properly, as they would go out of adjustment after a short period of time. She would routinely have problems with her bike when we were out on the road.

    This is not to say that the Dover 1.0 isn't a cheap bike with cheap brakes. Based on my experience, I would recommend a Bikes Direct bike over a Wal-Mart bike without hesitation.

    Based on posts in this thread from the OP, it appears that the OP could benefit from some hands-on practice in adjusting brakes under the supervision of an experienced mechanic. I've had low-end brakes on bike shop bikes that squealed, but was always able to adjust it out.
    Last edited by Scooby214; 09-18-12 at 06:31 AM.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg T View Post
    "there's so much slop in cheap brakes mounted to cheap frames"

    Are you saying my bike is too cheap?
    Don't fret over this remark, there is a bit of high brow in ALL forums.

    Use something to keep the brake lever pulled tightly to the handlebar, loosen the pad's bolt, slip a dime or a penny between the rim and the rear of the brake pad and retighten the pad's bolt. What you want is the front of the pad touching the rim just before the rear connects.

    Brad

  17. #17
    30 YR Wrench BikeWise1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scooby214 View Post
    The Bikes Direct bike I purchased last winter is a definite step up in comparison to Wal-Mart bikes. The frame is lighter, the components are better, and the bike is available in four frame sizes. Most Wal-Mart bikes are only sold in the store in one size.
    I did not state that ALL bikesdirect bikes are Walmart grade, did I?

    Quote Originally Posted by Scooby214 View Post
    This is not to say that the Dover 1.0 isn't a cheap bike with cheap brakes.
    Which IS what I said.

    As to the "too cheap" remark, only the OP can decide whether it was "too cheap" for his intended use. It might be perfectly fine for his/her use, but that bike, as delivered, is simply not designed with durability in mind. Nothing "high brow" about stating facts.

  18. #18
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg T View Post
    This is the windsore 3.0 I have the 1.0 No disk brakes.
    Toe-in on the brakes is probably your problem. Rim brakes are toed-in but discs aren't. The tails of the rim brake pads should be at least a few mm further away from the rim then the front (the toe). This keeps the brakes from lifting off the rim and chattering.

    If you can't get the brakes to stop squealing, I'd suggest Kool Stop Dual Compound pads. They squeal less they any pad I've ever used.
    Stuart Black
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  19. #19
    30 YR Wrench BikeWise1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    Toe-in on the brakes is probably your problem. Rim brakes are toed-in but discs aren't. The tails of the rim brake pads should be at least a few mm further away from the rim then the front (the toe). This keeps the brakes from lifting off the rim and chattering.
    I have found that on bikes with sloppy brakes, a reverse toe, that is, the rear edges touching first, is the only thing that truly ameliorates the noise.

  20. #20
    Mad bike riding scientist cyccommute's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikeWise1 View Post
    I have found that on bikes with sloppy brakes, a reverse toe, that is, the rear edges touching first, is the only thing that truly ameliorates the noise.
    That makes no sense since the problem is the front of the brake lifting off the rim as the wheel spins. The momentum of the wheel tends to push the pad forward and force the front apart. Making the rear hit first would just spread the fronts apart further. You might reduce the brake squeal but you'll also reduce the braking effectiveness.
    Stuart Black
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  21. #21
    30 YR Wrench BikeWise1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
    That makes no sense since the problem is the front of the brake lifting off the rim as the wheel spins. The momentum of the wheel tends to push the pad forward and force the front apart. Making the rear hit first would just spread the fronts apart further. You might reduce the brake squeal but you'll also reduce the braking effectiveness.
    You try and tell a customer that their brakes "just squeal" without addressing it! Actually comfort bikes and lightweight hybrids with linear pull brakes have brake power to burn, which is why manufacturers have had to put those stupid little springs in the front noodles to keep people from flinging themselves over the bars. I have not found reverse toe to be an issue. They'll still lock both wheels, which tells me they are imparting plenty of force to the rims. Your thought that the braking force is separating the pads further is notable, however, it can be observed that the flex and slop in such a system results in more pad on the rim as braking force rises, not less.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BikeWise1 View Post
    You are aware that the bike you purchased is at a quality level barely above that found at places like Walmart?
    This remark plainly tells me this guy only settles for the best of the best a "brand name guy". I really hate when people back pedal what they say. I'm not spending 1000 to 2000 for a bike. That's way too much. I compared my windsore to treks bikes at the bike shop there very comparable your just paying for the brand name. I know a lot of people on here have (bikes direct bikes) and love them. I also love my new bike it's really nice with an aluminum frame and brand name parts. My bike is used for recreation (fun) All I wanted was a nicer bike than my target bike. That what I got I'm very happy with it!
    Last edited by Greg T; 09-18-12 at 05:00 PM.

  23. #23
    30 YR Wrench BikeWise1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg T View Post
    This remark plainly tells me this guy only settles for the best of the best a "brand name guy". I really hate when people back pedal what they say. I'm not spending 1000 to 2000 for a bike. That's way too much. I compared my windsore to treks bikes at the bike shop there very comparable your just paying for the brand name. I know a lot of people on here have (bikes direct bikes) and love them. I also love my new bike it's really nice with an aluminum frame and brand name parts. My bike is used for recreation (fun) All I wanted was a nicer bike than my target bike. That what I got I'm very happy with it!
    That remark apparently went right over your head. You are the one who asked if the bike was "too cheap". I stated that the bike may or may not be, depending upon the way it will be used.

    But allow me to point out there is much more to bikes than just the cost of acquisition, which is the only benefit an internet seller can generally offer. It goes a lot deeper than just a name brand......these things that come with a bike from a good shop.....a proper fit, a professional assembly that got test ridden before you bought it so you don't have to spend time on internet forums asking for advice from strangers as to why your brakes squeak, on-the-spot warranty service, free tweaks (in most shops) and the ability to do business with someone with a vested interest in your community, not to mention the added benefit of keeping more of your money local. Instead, you got a generic bike in a box shipped to you by someone who couldn't care less whether you even ride it.

    To me the choice couldn't be more clear and I will continue to support my local independent everything. There's more to life than low prices at all costs.

    In the end, I truly hope you will enjoy your purchase and grow to love cycling even more than you already do. I've literally been a cyclist my entire life and have learned a few things along the way. One is that a cheap bike will remind every single time you ride it of its cheapness, while a better bike with more precise parts that are well-adjusted will be a joy every time, and for many years longer than the bargain bike. That's called value, and in the end, I believe it's more important than just the price.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikeWise1 View Post
    That remark apparently went right over your head. You are the one who asked if the bike was "too cheap". I stated that the bike may or may not be, depending upon the way it will be used.

    But allow me to point out there is much more to bikes than just the cost of acquisition, which is the only benefit an internet seller can generally offer. It goes a lot deeper than just a name brand......these things that come with a bike from a good shop.....a proper fit, a professional assembly that got test ridden before you bought it so you don't have to spend time on internet forums asking for advice from strangers as to why your brakes squeak, on-the-spot warranty service, free tweaks (in most shops) and the ability to do business with someone with a vested interest in your community, not to mention the added benefit of keeping more of your money local. Instead, you got a generic bike in a box shipped to you by someone who couldn't care less whether you even ride it.

    To me the choice couldn't be more clear and I will continue to support my local independent everything. There's more to life than low prices at all costs.

    In the end, I truly hope you will enjoy your purchase and grow to love cycling even more than you already do. I've literally been a cyclist my entire life and have learned a few things along the way. One is that a cheap bike will remind every single time you ride it of its cheapness, while a better bike with more precise parts that are well-adjusted will be a joy every time, and for many years longer than the bargain bike. That's called value, and in the end, I believe it's more important than just the price.
    I understand where your coming from but it's a little offensive to say I bought a bike just barely above wallmart bikes. I don't agree sorry. Since you work in a bike shop your going to stand up for your business understandable. I have a very nice bike shop not far from my home. That I shop at mostly for parts when needed. Looking at the bikes in there there very nice the cheapest at $500. I simply do not have that kind of money to spend on a bike. I have 3 children a mortgage and two car payments. Maybe one day when I have more money I will buy from my bike shop.
    Last edited by Greg T; 09-19-12 at 07:58 AM.

  25. #25
    biked well well biked's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikeWise1 View Post
    I have found that on bikes with sloppy brakes, a reverse toe, that is, the rear edges touching first, is the only thing that truly ameliorates the noise.
    I agree, and I had to be convinced of this with my own eyes before I believed it. At least I think I agree; I've never used the word "ameliorates" before.

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