Cycling and bicycle discussion forums. 
   Click here to join our community Log in to access your Control Panel  


Go Back   > >

Bicycle Mechanics Broken bottom bracket? Tacoed wheel? If you're having problems with your bicycle, or just need help fixing a flat, drop in here for the latest on bicycle mechanics & bicycle maintenance.

User Tag List

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 09-18-12, 11:31 AM   #1
EdgewaterDude
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
EdgewaterDude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Chicago, IL
Bikes: 2014 Trek Domane
Posts: 350
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Wheel Sits Too Close to Chain stay and other Maladies




Hi guys, I was wondering if I could get some insight on a few things:

First, I've noticed that the rear wheel on my '86 Voyageur sits precariously close the drive-side chainstay while I can get almost my whole pinky between the wheel and the left chainstay. I've looked to see if could align or adjust via drop-out adjustment screws, but this frame has none. Also, the dropouts are vertical, if that is pertinent information. I've got a few pictures of everything if need be. What can I do to make sure the wheel sits straight?

Second, my rear derailleur cage also sits very, very close to the spokes. I've checked to see if the hanger is bent, but it appears everything is ok. When on the largest gear, the hanger sits within 5mm or so of the spokes. It's a little worrying to me.

I should also say that this isn't the original rear wheel. Someone replaced the OEM wheel with an Araya that has a 6 speed freewheel on it instead of the 5 speed that was stock. Would this create any spacing issues or cause any of the issues I have?
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 088.jpg (94.4 KB, 76 views)
File Type: jpg 089.jpg (94.5 KB, 74 views)
File Type: jpg 090.jpg (94.8 KB, 77 views)
File Type: jpg 093.jpg (13.0 KB, 189 views)
File Type: jpg 096.jpg (20.8 KB, 63 views)
File Type: jpg 097.jpg (17.9 KB, 60 views)

Last edited by EdgewaterDude; 09-18-12 at 11:39 AM.
EdgewaterDude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 11:59 AM   #2
mrrabbit 
Senior Member
 
mrrabbit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: San Jose, California
Bikes: 2001 Tommasini Sintesi w/ Campagnolo Daytona 10 Speed
Posts: 3,193
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Common Hub Specs for Freewheel Type Hub

Dimension A = Freewheel Stop to End of Locknut
Dimension C = Outside Locknut to Outside Locknut


Regular Spacing

5-speed C = 120.00-122.00mm A = 29.00mm
6-speed C = 120.00-122.00mm A = 35.00mm (C = 125.00 - 127.00mm is optional)

Narrow Spacing - Road

6-speed C = 120.00-122.00mm OR 125.00-127.00mm A = 31.00mm
7-speed C = 125.00-127.00mm OR 130.00mm A = 36.00mm
8-speed C = 125.00-127.00mm OR 130.00mm A = 40.50mm (Not the best to go with...)

Narrow Spacing - MTB

7-speed C = 125.00-127.00mm (Not the best to go with...) OR 130.00-135.00mm A = 39.00mm
8-speed C = 130.00-135.00mm A = 40.50

Be aware that very old frames from the 50's and 60's often have dropout faces that are so large that the smallest outermost cog and chain will be contained within - i.e., spacing to 130mm for 8/9/10 has a high success rate for chain clearance near the seat stay.

Be aware that relatively newer frames from the 90s onward have stays that approach the OUTSIDE of the dropouts - i.e., they're offset to the outside. This creates room for 8/9/10 setups while providing chain clearance for the chain and seat stay while the chain is on the smallest cog.

Be aware however, that many entry to mid-range frames in the 80s had small dropouts combined with stays that hit the dropouts inline - not offset to the outside. Spreading to 130mm for 8/9/10 setups is not guaranteed to work - you need to test the clearance between the seat stay and the chain while the chain rests on the smallest outermost cog.

=8-)
__________________
4000+ wheels built since 1984...

Disclaimer:

1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
5. My all time favorite book is:

Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life

Last edited by mrrabbit; 09-18-12 at 12:05 PM.
mrrabbit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 12:19 PM   #3
EdgewaterDude
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
EdgewaterDude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Chicago, IL
Bikes: 2014 Trek Domane
Posts: 350
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
So if I'm understanding you correctly, the fact that someone put a 6 speed freewheel with its corresponding sized hub, this is what causes the spacing to be off?
EdgewaterDude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 12:31 PM   #4
mrrabbit 
Senior Member
 
mrrabbit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: San Jose, California
Bikes: 2001 Tommasini Sintesi w/ Campagnolo Daytona 10 Speed
Posts: 3,193
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
If the old hub was a 5-speed hub and meant solely for a 5-speed freewheel - not a modern day Ultra/Narrow 6-speed freewheel - you'll have a situation where the chain will reside 2mm closer to the seat stay than it should.

If the old hub was spaced for an Ultra/Narrow 6-speed freewheel and you put an old regular spaced 6-speed freewheel on it - you'll have a situation where the chain will reside 4mm closer to the seat stay - assuming it's not scraping the seat stay already.

=8-)

Dimension A is the key - that determine what freewheel can be used - it's the industry's way of saying:

"Here's what will fit on the hub, clear the seat stay chain-wise AND keep the chain line somewhere near the middle of the freewheel."

=8-)
__________________
4000+ wheels built since 1984...

Disclaimer:

1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
5. My all time favorite book is:

Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life
mrrabbit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 12:32 PM   #5
Homebrew01
Super Moderator
 
Homebrew01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Ffld Cnty Connecticut
Bikes: Old Steelies I made, Old Cannondales
Posts: 20,040
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 275 Post(s)
I can't see anything wrong based on your pictures. (you've got 5 pictures of your QR lever) I assume you mean that the tire is almost rubbing one side of the frame ?
The wheel spacing is not affected by the hub size. Usually, the problem is caused because the rim is not centered between the hub locknuts. So it's a little to the left or right. If you take the wheel out, and put it in backwards, with the cogs on the wrong side, is the wheel still too close to the same chainstay, or is it now close to the other one ?

Sometimes a bent frame can be the cause, but much less common that an uncentered rim.

As for the derailleur, I think you mean the "cage" is 5mm from the spokes. The "hanger" is the part of the frame the derailleur bolts to. As long as it doesn't hit the spokes when shifted completely on the largest cog, you are probably ok. If your bike gets dropped or crashed on the drive side, check for damage and that the gears are still good before riding. If something's bent, you could then end up with a derailleur in the spokes ... which is not fun.
__________________
Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike

Last edited by Homebrew01; 09-18-12 at 12:41 PM.
Homebrew01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 12:41 PM   #6
mrrabbit 
Senior Member
 
mrrabbit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: San Jose, California
Bikes: 2001 Tommasini Sintesi w/ Campagnolo Daytona 10 Speed
Posts: 3,193
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Homebrew01 View Post
I can't see anything wrong based on your pictures. (you've got 5 pictures of your QR lever) I assume you mean that the tire is almost rubbing one side of the frame ?
The wheel spacing is not affected by the hub size. Usually, the problem is caused because the rim is not centered between the hub locknuts. So it's a little to the left or right. If you take the wheel out, and put it in backwards, with the cogs on the wrong side, is the wheel still too close to the same chainstay, or is it now close to the other one ?

Sometimes a bent frame can be the cause, but much less common that an uncentered rim.

As for the derailleur, I think you mean the "cage" is 5mm from the spokes. As long as it doesn't hit the spokes when shifted completely on the largest cog, you are probably ok. If your bike gets dropped or crashed on the drive side, check for damage and that the gears are still good before riding. If something's bent, you could then end up with a derailleur in the spokes ... which is not fun.
We really could use a photo from the back that shows the derailleur, freewheel, right dropout and chain/seatstay in one straight on shot.

=8-)
__________________
4000+ wheels built since 1984...

Disclaimer:

1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
5. My all time favorite book is:

Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life
mrrabbit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 01:02 PM   #7
zandoval
Senior Member
 
zandoval's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Bastrop Texas
Bikes: Univega, PR-10, Ted Williams,UO-8, Puch, PHLE, UO-18 Mixte
Posts: 1,777
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
When switching a wheel set from one bike to another I have often just put a bottom bracket spacer or two behind the freewheel... Its a quick but dirty shortcut...

Attached Images
File Type: jpg 413vPlvHiiL._SL500_AA300_.jpg (15.5 KB, 5 views)
zandoval is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 01:13 PM   #8
EdgewaterDude
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
EdgewaterDude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Chicago, IL
Bikes: 2014 Trek Domane
Posts: 350
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrrabbit View Post
We really could use a photo from the back that shows the derailleur, freewheel, right dropout and chain/seatstay in one straight on shot.

=8-)

As in looking directly at the side of the bike? I just took a few looking down into the derailleur, freewheel and right drop out.
EdgewaterDude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 01:14 PM   #9
mrrabbit 
Senior Member
 
mrrabbit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: San Jose, California
Bikes: 2001 Tommasini Sintesi w/ Campagnolo Daytona 10 Speed
Posts: 3,193
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by zandoval View Post
When switching a wheel set from one bike to another I have often just put a bottom bracket spacer or two behind the freewheel... Its a quick but dirty shortcut...

How does putting a spacer behind a freewheel solve the problem if the freewheel is already putting the chain up against the seat stay?

Quick and dirty shortcuts are nice IF they're not being used to hide an underlying issue.

=8-)
__________________
4000+ wheels built since 1984...

Disclaimer:

1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
5. My all time favorite book is:

Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life
mrrabbit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 01:31 PM   #10
cny-bikeman
Mechanic/Tourist
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Syracuse, NY
Bikes: 2008 Novara Randonee - love it. Would have more bikes if I had time to ride them all. Previous bikes: 1968 Motobecane Mirage, 1972 Moto Grand Jubilee (my fav), Jackson Rake 16, 1983 C'dale ST500.
Posts: 6,434
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 97 Post(s)
Yep, solves one problem, creates two more - cog close to dropout/stay and poorer chainline with small chainwheel. If it is doable it's of course important to readust the derailleurs.
cny-bikeman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 01:57 PM   #11
EdgewaterDude
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
EdgewaterDude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Chicago, IL
Bikes: 2014 Trek Domane
Posts: 350
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Here are a few more:

Attached Images
File Type: jpg 128.jpg (88.4 KB, 84 views)
File Type: jpg 129.jpg (89.6 KB, 61 views)
File Type: jpg 130.jpg (53.2 KB, 59 views)
File Type: jpg 132.jpg (11.7 KB, 167 views)
File Type: jpg 133.jpg (12.7 KB, 168 views)
EdgewaterDude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 02:27 PM   #12
mrrabbit 
Senior Member
 
mrrabbit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: San Jose, California
Bikes: 2001 Tommasini Sintesi w/ Campagnolo Daytona 10 Speed
Posts: 3,193
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
As far as the hub spacing on the drive side looks, not too bad really. So long as the chain clears the seat stay when the chain is on the smallest cog - I don't see any worry at this point.

Do make certain the derailleur limit screws high and low are set properly - the last thing you want to do is throw the chain into the spokes - that'll cost you big time. While the chain guard offer protection against that - doesn't hurt to set the limit screws right as a matter of practice.

=8-)
__________________
4000+ wheels built since 1984...

Disclaimer:

1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
5. My all time favorite book is:

Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life
mrrabbit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 02:33 PM   #13
himespau 
Senior Member
 
himespau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Louisville, KY
Bikes:
Posts: 9,701
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 171 Post(s)
That fender bolt looks like it might be a problem when the chain is on the smallest cog. I had a similar level of closeness and because my derailleur hanger got bent some bad shifts would occasionally cause the chain to go off the inside of the small cog. Then it wedges between that screw, the seatstay and the cog and can be a bear to get out on the road in the middle of nowhere. A properly adjusted derailleur should avoid that particular problem however.
himespau is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 04:00 PM   #14
EdgewaterDude
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
EdgewaterDude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Chicago, IL
Bikes: 2014 Trek Domane
Posts: 350
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The fender bolt was a temporary 'holding place' while I took off the fender so we could get a better look. I do appreciate the insight on that.

So all is well? It's totally OK that the wheel doesn't sit exactly in the center with equidistant width between each chainstay?
EdgewaterDude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 04:30 PM   #15
mrrabbit 
Senior Member
 
mrrabbit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: San Jose, California
Bikes: 2001 Tommasini Sintesi w/ Campagnolo Daytona 10 Speed
Posts: 3,193
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Post #12

=8-)
__________________
4000+ wheels built since 1984...

Disclaimer:

1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
5. My all time favorite book is:

Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life
mrrabbit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 06:14 PM   #16
Homebrew01
Super Moderator
 
Homebrew01's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Ffld Cnty Connecticut
Bikes: Old Steelies I made, Old Cannondales
Posts: 20,040
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 275 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdgewaterDude View Post
So all is well? It's totally OK that the wheel doesn't sit exactly in the center with equidistant width between each chainstay?
It doesn't have to be exact. Different people have their own definition of "good enough". If it's not rubbing, you can ride it, or try to improve it if you want.
__________________
Bikes: Old steel race bikes, old Cannondale race bikes, less old Cannondale race bike, crappy old mtn bike
Homebrew01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 06:17 PM   #17
Reynolds 
Passista
 
Reynolds's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Bikes: 1998 Pinarello Asolo, 1992 KHS Montaņa pro, 1980 Raleigh DL-1, IGH Hybrid, IGH Utility
Posts: 5,574
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 45 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdgewaterDude View Post
The fender bolt was a temporary 'holding place' while I took off the fender so we could get a better look. I do appreciate the insight on that.

So all is well? It's totally OK that the wheel doesn't sit exactly in the center with equidistant width between each chainstay?
The hub seems OK, but still the rim can be nearer to one side if it isn't correctly dished. You should take the wheel off and check out with a dish stick.
Reynolds is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 06:23 PM   #18
ultraman6970
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Bikes:
Posts: 7,860
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Anybody can point where is the problem? I can't find anything weird with the bike. The other thing is that the bike is not a "high end colnago" and has some stuff here and there like for example the eyelets for the fenders in the rear like in the wrong place or maybe screws too long but can't see any problem with the bike. Even the dork wheel is still there.
ultraman6970 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 06:44 PM   #19
LarDasse74
Guest
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Grid Reference, SK
Bikes: I never learned to ride a bike. It is my deepest shame.
Posts: 3,769
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Unless your chain is rubbing on the dropout or the chainstay when in the smaller cogs, then there is nothing to worry about from the spacing in the back.

If the tire is closer to one side than the other, the first thing you should do is remove the wheel, flip it around, and re-install it with the freewheel on the left and the chain riding on the axle of the other side of the wheel. If the tire is closer to the side that previously had lots of room, or more in the centre, then the problem is, at least in part, that your rim is not centred between the axle locknuts (out of dish). If the wheel is still close to the same chainstay as before, then the problem is the frame.
LarDasse74 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 07:41 PM   #20
Bill Kapaun
Senior Member
 
Bill Kapaun's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Mid Willamette Valley, Orygun
Bikes: 86 RockHopper,2008 Specialized Globe. Both upgraded to 9 speeds.
Posts: 9,496
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 125 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Homebrew01 View Post
....If you take the wheel out, and put it in backwards, with the cogs on the wrong side, is the wheel still too close to the same chainstay, or is it now close to the other one ?...
That has my curiosity too-
Bill Kapaun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-12, 08:02 PM   #21
EdgewaterDude
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
EdgewaterDude's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Chicago, IL
Bikes: 2014 Trek Domane
Posts: 350
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'll try this little check tomorrow.

BTW, this wheel is out of true and bent - I would not be surprised if it's not dished correctly.
EdgewaterDude is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-12, 09:27 AM   #22
ksisler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Bikes:
Posts: 1,662
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Looking at the pix of the chainstay with the tire in...it looks like the frame was build for very skinny tires and the current wheel has some fairly fat tires on it. That will make any issues with dish, spacers, etc., more likely to be noticed. I would suggesting borrowing a known good wheel from someone (or may from a LBS) and slide it all the way in, hold it there or tighten the QR, and see if the rim is centered between the stays or pretty close to centered. Also be sure to take out or replace that fender mount screw with a shorter one before you end up with the chain jammed in between it and the cog as that will not be a good situation. Of course, follow with all the other replies about spacers and whatnot...
ksisler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-12, 09:30 AM   #23
ksisler
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Bikes:
Posts: 1,662
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Add: Suggest getting one of those pie-pan protectors to put in behind the freewheel so you don't have to worry about the derailleur hitting the spokes. They look a bit Walmart-ish nay Sears-ish, but it beats walking home with skin missing and a parts bill to face.
ksisler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-12, 10:23 AM   #24
mrrabbit 
Senior Member
 
mrrabbit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: San Jose, California
Bikes: 2001 Tommasini Sintesi w/ Campagnolo Daytona 10 Speed
Posts: 3,193
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksisler View Post
Looking at the pix of the chainstay with the tire in...it looks like the frame was build for very skinny tires and the current wheel has some fairly fat tires on it. That will make any issues with dish, spacers, etc., more likely to be noticed. I would suggesting borrowing a known good wheel from someone (or may from a LBS) and slide it all the way in, hold it there or tighten the QR, and see if the rim is centered between the stays or pretty close to centered. Also be sure to take out or replace that fender mount screw with a shorter one before you end up with the chain jammed in between it and the cog as that will not be a good situation. Of course, follow with all the other replies about spacers and whatnot...
Spacing appears to be fine, see photo...

Dish is what others are having the OP check...he'll get back to us.

If a tire is too fat for stays - it'll be because of the tire and the stays, not because of dish or hub spacing.

Overlong fender mount screw has already been dealt with...

He already has a spoke protector...

Pay attention please...

=8-)
__________________
4000+ wheels built since 1984...

Disclaimer:

1. I do not claim to be an expert in bicycle mechanics despite my experience.
2. I like anyone will comment in other areas.
3. I do not own the preexisting concepts of DISH and ERD.
4. I will provide information as I always have to others that I believe will help them protect themselves from unscrupulous mechanics.
5. My all time favorite book is:

Kahane, Howard. Logic and Contemporary Rhetoric: The Use of Reason in Everyday Life
mrrabbit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-12, 10:53 AM   #25
Kimmo
bike whisperer
 
Kimmo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Melbourne, Oz
Bikes: velospace.org/viewcluster?c=873
Posts: 7,115
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by EdgewaterDude View Post
Second, my rear derailleur cage also sits very, very close to the spokes. I've checked to see if the hanger is bent, but it appears everything is ok. When on the largest gear, the hanger sits within 5mm or so of the spokes. It's a little worrying to me.
LOL. I wouldn't sweat it, man.



That's a 2mm key. Mind you, that's a G3 wheel; the spokes aren't laced.



This is more normal; 3-4mm. Handy how the spokes cross right about where the derailleur comes nearest the wheel, innit.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg IMG_20120920_023429.jpg (64.7 KB, 10 views)
File Type: jpg IMG_20120920_023752.jpg (50.6 KB, 9 views)
Kimmo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:28 PM.