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Old 11-27-12, 09:14 AM   #1
gtvnt
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I've designed a locking solution for a Commuting bike, is it worth?

I've noticed that Commuters ("bikers in suits") often are not happy with U-Locks, Cable Locks, etc., as dealing with them can be a kind of embarrasing. Also when you leave your bike for 5 min (like buying that doughnut), messing with e.g. a U-Lock is not appealing at all.

That motivated me to develop a locking solution against occasional stealing that is less messy and quite quicker to use. It also suggests less contact with mud (important for the Commuters and maybe even for some mountain bikers). So I've spent several evenings to shape my thoughts and put the result (code name "BuLLLock") on Coroflot (site for designers):

http://www.coroflot.com/vitgean/The-...-the-Commuters

Now I'm curious about what other bikers might think about this. Is it worth materializing, or other solutions are still better for the Commuter?

Would you please advise.

Thank you.

Vit

Last edited by gtvnt; 11-27-12 at 09:32 AM.
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Old 11-27-12, 09:29 AM   #2
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Not bad.

You may be overstating people's frustration with conventional locks though. Reminds me of the infomercial on The Simpsons for the Juice Loosener, where actor Troy McClure is making orange juice by squeezing an orange against his eye, and then says 'I wish there was an easier way!'
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Old 11-27-12, 09:46 AM   #3
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Hi,

My dislike for U locks lead me to buy a Masterlock Cuffs lock. Still has the kryptonite-like anti-theft warranty and is a bunch easier to use.

Cheers,
Charles
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Old 11-27-12, 10:02 AM   #4
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I live in Sacramento, California which has a relatively high bike
theft rate per rider...........i would be reluctant to endorse any
locking system that encourages momentary locking that "just
blocks the wheel" for a quick run into a coffee shop.

Just my take on the issue.
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Old 11-27-12, 10:07 AM   #5
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Hi,

My dislike for U locks lead me to buy a Masterlock Cuffs lock. Still has the kryptonite-like anti-theft warranty and is a bunch easier to use.

Cheers,
Charles
One of these days I'll be getting those too, that's my preferred alternative to a U-lock too.
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Old 11-27-12, 10:16 AM   #6
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A lot of forks nowadays are made of carbon fiber and have fluted, oversized, and/or aero shape tubing. How is your mounting system going to mount on all of these different sized forks? The one you have pictured has a shape like a steel fork.
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Old 11-27-12, 10:26 AM   #7
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Not to pat myself on the back but to give you a basis for evaluating my opinion. I've been a bike accessory distributor for 40+ years, and for many of those was the largest distributor for Kryptonite in the world.

Your lock falls into the Catch-22 middle ground. It isn't secure enough to replace a decent U-lock, and it's too heavy to replace a light "run-in-for-a-minute" anti-grab-and-run lock. There was a lock of a very similar design some 20 years ago, that sold a decent amount (to dealers) in their first year, and now 20+ years later, you can still find them collecting dust among the other locks.
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Old 11-27-12, 10:31 AM   #8
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it just like an old Swedish/Finnish wheel lock, which is usually welded to the frame in the rear triangle.

at least 30 years old ... every Monark had one
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Old 11-27-12, 10:58 AM   #9
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I agree with all above. + It is the absolutely the most STUPID POS I have ever seen. (Except rod/U brakes)
Rear wheel Ring locks would be far better.
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Old 11-27-12, 11:15 AM   #10
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Many European utility bikes have a built-in lock that immobilizes the fork so the concept isn't new. Since this lock only immobilizes the front wheel and does not attach the bike to anything solid, all the thief has to do is pick it up and toss it in a car or truck. Motorcycles also have fork locks but they are generally too heavy to swipe easily.
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Old 11-27-12, 11:19 AM   #11
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Many European utility bikes have a built-in lock that immobilizes the fork so the concept isn't new. Since this lock only immobilizes the front wheel and does not attach the bike to anything solid, all the thief has to do is pick it up and toss it in a car or truck. Motorcycles also have fork locks but they are generally too heavy to swipe easily.
The hook part is meant to loop around a stationary object.
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Old 11-27-12, 11:37 AM   #12
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The hook part is meant to loop around a stationary object.
It seems to be mostly intended just to go through the front wheel spokes to keep the wheel from rotating. For looping around a stationary object, the object better be small as the hook has a very narrow span.
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Old 11-27-12, 11:40 AM   #13
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...........i would be reluctant to endorse any
locking system that encourages momentary locking that "just
blocks the wheel" for a quick run into a coffee shop.
Differing from e.g. Frame Locks, the BuLLLock allows attaching to outside objects as well. Just locking a wheel is not enough. For sure.

Vit
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Old 11-27-12, 11:42 AM   #14
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Looks interesting but with an expensive bike I'd be worried that the thief would cut off the fork leg and take the rest of the bike. Replacement forks are pretty cheap.

Based on comments above it looks like your illustrations should show the bike locked to a rack or pole to make it clear how it secures the bike. Kickstarter might be a good way to judge market interest.
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Old 11-27-12, 11:43 AM   #15
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It attaches to any pole (at any angle) with thicknes within about 3 inches, so suitable for most parking places.
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Old 11-27-12, 11:47 AM   #16
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A lot of forks nowadays are made of carbon fiber and have fluted, oversized, and/or aero shape tubing. How is your mounting system going to mount on all of these different sized forks? The one you have pictured has a shape like a steel fork.
That's an issue indeed. The BuLLLock is problematic to use with this kind of forks (either doesn't fit or can damage the fork), the rest audience remains quite big anyway, I suppose?
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Old 11-27-12, 11:47 AM   #17
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I like it, thumbs up
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Old 11-27-12, 11:49 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by HillRider View Post
Many European utility bikes have a built-in lock that immobilizes the fork so the concept isn't new. Since this lock only immobilizes the front wheel and does not attach the bike to anything solid, all the thief has to do is pick it up and toss it in a car or truck. Motorcycles also have fork locks but they are generally too heavy to swipe easily.
Differing from e.g. Frame Locks (that just immobilize the bike) the BuLLLock allows for attaching to external object. Span of the lock's braket can be quite big, about 3 inches, what suffices in most situations.

Vit
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Old 11-27-12, 11:52 AM   #19
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Looks interesting but with an expensive bike I'd be worried that the thief would cut off the fork leg and take the rest of the bike. Replacement forks are pretty cheap.

Based on comments above it looks like your illustrations should show the bike locked to a rack or pole to make it clear how it secures the bike. Kickstarter might be a good way to judge market interest.
The BuLLLock is mostly against a casual stealing (most common and annoying threat). For a "professional" thief it's not a problem indeed, as well as majority of other locks.

Vit
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Old 11-27-12, 12:08 PM   #20
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.... Kickstarter might be a good way to judge market interest.
Kickstarter needs a good prototype and handwork. Unfortunately, my hands are made rather from clay . If anyone with golden hands would like to explore this opportunity and to invest his time and efforts, he is really welcome to the team (I'm the only one member of that team so far ).

Vit
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Old 11-27-12, 01:06 PM   #21
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I like this concept. But a question: How is the lock secured to the hook? Is there a collar that clamps down when the key is rotated into position, or is there a catch that fits into one of the grooves on the hook?
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Old 11-27-12, 01:12 PM   #22
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My u-lock sits in my pannier and stays clean. A lock attached to my fork would get wet and dirty, which would then make my hands dirty when using it.

It seems only marginally easier to use than a u-lock if at all.

I would have to buy one per bike.

No thanks.
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Old 11-27-12, 01:17 PM   #23
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I like this concept. But a question: How is the lock secured to the hook? Is there a collar that clamps down when the key is rotated into position, or is there a catch that fits into one of the grooves on the hook?
The hook can be pressed (clicked) into the lock as far as possible to be closely attached to e.g. a pole (so less space for a thief to manipulate with the lock - advantage before many U-locks) and secured there. The key is needed only to get the hook out of the lock. The hook can be inserted into the lock and fixed there at desired position without the key.
This approach decreases quantity of operations and simplifies use of the lock what is really important for a Commuter.

Vit
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Old 11-27-12, 01:24 PM   #24
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My u-lock sits in my pannier and stays clean. A lock attached to my fork would get wet and dirty, which would then make my hands dirty when using it.

It seems only marginally easier to use than a u-lock if at all.

I would have to buy one per bike.

No thanks.
A note about dirt is very much reasonable and should be addressed somehow indeed (regular cleaning? Not sure). From other hand you don't have to put the lock through the dirty bike what is an advantage before a U-Lock (even a medically clean one ).

As for the number of locks, two per bike would be better - the BuLLLock for the front fork and a Frame Lock for the rear wheel. This will compile a simple and quick to use solution that will protect frame and both wheels from casual stealing providing ability to attach the bike to an external object at the same time.

Vit
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Old 11-27-12, 01:53 PM   #25
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I have watched all the videos and seen so many ideas over the years and it boils down to just a few things. 1. The opportunist who sees a bike unlocked and needs a ride or sees a quick flip and grabs the bike and goes. In this case the newer bike he will take first but will just as well take a beater bike that’s unlocked. 2. Then there are the pros looking for quality bikes and also parts. They have all the powered equipment and can cut a lock or a cable or a frame or wheel in seconds and take whatever they can get. If you are looking to avoid having your frame cut in two you have little chance no matter what the lock is. 3. Is the amateur crook with a 30 buck pair of bolt cutters trying to get some drug money. When he sees he can’t get thru a locking system he’s likely to twist your frame or give it a wack just because.

The biggest thing IMO to safe guard a bike for a short time is crappy looking bike, good visibility, some simple deterrent, and maybe an alarm, silent or not or both built into the lock system that needs the key to kill it.

If stores etc. were bike friendly had indoor parking and or surveillance cams. They would pick up business from the biking community.

It’s sad but true have a crappy bike at least looking a half way good lock and mark down your numbers and add some markings to the bike in the event it’s found.

As to your design I like it. The people here many of them ride and secure some really good quality bikes and that raises some of the concerns you have seen. You could sell a billion of these if the price point was right thru Walmart. People buy kids bikes there every day and kids loose locks. This would work for the kid locking his bike up at school etc. and then he would lose the key. Dad would have the spare and it should come with 4 keys.

Good luck if this was the “Shark Tank” I would be in for 25%. 49% if you add a wireless remote alarm.
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