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Thread: Lube Me Up

  1. #1
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    Lube Me Up

    I'm a newbie to bike maintenance & mechanics. I am assembling a bike piece by piece and I need to know what lubricants are appropriate for pretty much all the various components. Would someone be kind enough to tell me what I can use Phil Wood Grease or Shimano Workshop Grease (I've already purchases these) for? What else do I need? I'm just going to list the parts I'm in question about:

    1) chain ring bolts
    2) handlebar
    3) seat post
    4) v-brakes--where they are screwed onto the bike frame
    5) wheels--where they attatch to the frame
    6) rear casette--the rings themselves AND where they attatch to the hub (hope that makes sense)
    7) brake levers--the various screws and such that keep them 1 piece (I dissassembled both in order to paint part)

    Thank you for your time.

  2. #2
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    It depends on a number of things. Most threads on a bicycle should be lubricated with grease simply to stop them corroding together. The same is true for the seatpost.

    No lubricant is required anywhere on the handlebar, although a handlebar stem (the part that attaches to the fork and clamps the handlebars) should be greased where it's inside the fork steerer if it's a quill type.

    If you have a thread-on freewheel, the threads which attach it to the hub should be greased. If you have a splined cassette system, you might want to grease the lockring threads.

    V-brake bosses should be greased where the brakes actually slide onto them, because although most modern V-brakes use an internal bushing rather than using the brake boss as the bearing surface for the pivot, they can still corrode onto the bosses.

    With quick-release wheels, the skewer should be greased where it passes through the axle. With nutted axles, the threads should be greased, and I tend to put grease between the axle nut and the washer underneath it, to make it easier to tighten the nut.

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    Thank you Airburst. Will my Phil Wood Grease or Shimano Workshop Grease be appropriate for all the areas you mentioned?

  4. #4
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    Yes, but both of those are probably more expensive than you need. A lot of people just use a decent marine bearing grease on their bikes, which is a lot cheaper and works just as well.

  5. #5
    S'Cruzer pierce's Avatar
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    indeed, I have an ancient tube of Phil Wood grease, and I have a grease *** with generic green Marine Waterproof Bearing Grease. I can't tell them apart.


    pretty much anything threaded that you're reassembling, you put a light coat of grease on the threads, then wipe up any excess after assembling this includes the threads on the handlebar clamps (but NO grease on the handlebar clamping surfaces!)

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