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Old 04-04-13, 09:06 PM   #1
nans
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How to properly cut a chain

Hello all i just got a new KMC Z410 NP chain for my Raleigh Sports and it seems a wee bit too long for the current set up. The chain is 1/2 x 1/8" - 112 links. I guess i can bring the the back tire back on the drop outs a little more but it looks like im going to have to cut the chain to make it fit.

I would appreciate any suggestions as far how to properly use a chain cutter because i would hate twisting or bending up the chain to the point where its unuseable or may not link properly with the master link..

Thanks
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Old 04-04-13, 09:12 PM   #2
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http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-...railleur-bikes
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Old 04-04-13, 09:36 PM   #3
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Generally you need a chain tool to cut a chain, but if you don't have one, here are two methods you can use.

1- if you have a steel plate with a hole in it, you can drive the pin out with a hammer and punch. Be sure the plate is flat and rigid, since you want good support, lest you bend a plate.

2- you can grind the ends of both pins on the same outer plate down to the plate, then they punch through pretty easily and you remove the other plate from the opposite with both pins still attached. This is the normal method for large or wide industrial chains.

Of course, chain tools are pretty cheap, so the back up methods only make sense in unique circumstances.
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Old 04-05-13, 05:34 AM   #4
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Just make sure that the pin on the chain tool is *exactly* lined up with the chain pin, and watch that it doesn't 'walk' to the side too much just when the pressure starts to ratchet up before the chain pin 'pops'. :thumb
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Old 04-05-13, 11:54 AM   #5
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ok thanks for the replies.. i have a chain braker tool i converted to a cotterpin remover but it seems too big for the small bicycle chain. Looks like its built for mopeds or someting. We will see how it goes.
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Old 04-05-13, 11:59 AM   #6
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A new chain tool with a punch that will fit both older larger pins and newer smaller pins isn't expensive. It will save you a lot of headaches when working on chains.

-Jenrick
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