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  1. #1
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    Need Some Quick Help

    Hi I'm new to this bike building business and have a few questions...

    1). Does anyone know how to take off this crank? It's hollow inside so my regular crank puller won't work:
    Picture

    2). If I have regular 1 1/8" cups on either side of my head tube, and bearings such as the pic below, is it possible to buy a sealed headset instead? What types are compatible with these cups (names such as integrated etc)?
    Picture, Picture of cups

    3). My pedals are moving side to side, there are gaps in the main axles, is this normal or should I add washers, and how do I pull the axles out to do this?
    Notice the gap on the left side

    4). The distance between the rear dropouts is 150mm, is this normal spacing for a mountain bike because all my other bikes are around 15mm shorter? Can I use ordinary wheels/hubs or do I need special type? Also can I tighten it until the rear triangle gets pulled in by tension or should I use washers to prevent this from happening?

    Thanks!
    Last edited by mm66554; 04-06-13 at 12:56 PM.

  2. #2
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    Well,

    1). That looks like an ISIS BB axle, which needs a standard crank puller, but one with a larger 'button' at the end of it. Some of the better ones like the Park-brand one come with a couple of different ends to suit normal square taper, or the larger, hollow-spindle types, like yours.

    27401659f9d922b0c035cd877b455630526548b9_430x390.jpg
    You can just use the normal, small end but use a small coin at the end of it to provide the correct fit.

    2). What are you trying to achieve with this - what's wrong with your current headset?

    3). Were the pedals always like this, or is that a recent development?
    Last edited by Continuity; 04-06-13 at 12:52 PM.

  3. #3
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    1- assuming that your BB is a conventional one with the spindle affixed and the cranks mounted you need a different puller with a larger pushing pad. Yhese are often identified as for octalink, or Isis. Some newer pullers have two pushers, one for square taper, and one for Isis. If you don't have time or desire to get a new puller, you can sometimes get by with washers or a coin to bridge the gap in the hollow spindle. It needs to be too big to fall in, and small enough to fit through the crank itself. If memory serves, a dime will do the trick, though you might have to file the diameter down a hair.

    2- yes they do sell sealed bearing headsets for your bike. You have to replace the entire headset including the fork crown race and both pressed in cups, you cannot simply switch out the bearing. This only makes sense if you need or want a new headset, otherwise it won't be materially better than your existing one. You also have the inexpensive option of replacing just the balls, and fitting them without using a retainer. many feel this works better, but IME the only advantages are availability, and that you can't accidentally put the retainer in upside down

    3- I'm not familiar with your pedals. Most have bearings designed to prevent lateral float. Yours apparently don't. You might be able to fit washers or spacers to take up the float, but it depends on the details like if the end hardware can be removed.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Continuity View Post
    2). What are you trying to achieve with this - what's wrong with your current headset?

    3). Were the pedals always like this, or is that a recent development?
    OK thanks I will try this. As for above questions, my headset is old and I was wondering whether I can get something which will run smoother (sealed bearings). And the pedals are second hand so no idea whether they're supposed to be like this.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY View Post
    2- yes they do sell sealed bearing headsets for your bike. You have to replace the entire headset including the fork crown race and both pressed in cups, you cannot simply switch out the bearing. This only makes sense if you need or want a new headset, otherwise it won't be materially better than your existing one. You also have the inexpensive option of replacing just the balls, and fitting them without using a retainer. many feel this works better, but IME the only advantages are availability, and that you can't accidentally put the retainer in upside down

    3- I'm not familiar with your pedals. Most have bearings designed to prevent lateral float. Yours apparently don't. You might be able to fit washers or spacers to take up the float, but it depends on the details like if the end hardware can be removed.
    So are the sealed headsets which will fit called semi-integrated? I don't know why I just assume sealed bearings are smoother, have them on my BMX which seems much better at steering.

    I think the pedals are called Straitline De Facto. http://gp1.pinkbike.org/p4pb7261243/p4pb7261243.jpg
    Last edited by mm66554; 04-06-13 at 01:09 PM.

  6. #6
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    AFAIK, semi-integrateds are made for frames designed for them from the start - you should be able to buy a 'standard' headset, but one that uses cartridge bearings rather than cup'n'cone ones.

    Cartridge bearings can be nice in hubs, but there is certainly nothing wrong with cup'n'cone hubs/headsets if they are of decent quality and adjusted well. A good c'n'c will always be better than a cheapo cartridge unit.

  7. #7
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    +1, you can't use a semi-integrated HS. You need a standard press-in headset, whether it uses cartridge or conventional bearings. If your old headset is worn or you're just plain unhappy with it, go ahead and replace, but if it's OK, repacking with grease and adjusting correctly will serve you fine.

    I ride nothing but high end bikes, and have never used sealed bearing headsets, and hopefully never will. I prefer the easy serviceability of conventional bearings on bikes. Sealed bearing headsets are no better or worse than conventional of comparable quality, just different.
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  8. #8
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    No fair going back and editing the original post with more questions.

    As ARS points out 150mm spacing is usually for an oversize 12mm axle configuration. If the slot in your dropouts is larger than 10mm you cannot use your wheels no matter what you do*. If the dropouts are 10mm you can make your frame narrower to fit your wheels.

    Actually you can fashion 10mm-12mm adapter bushings for the axles, but I figure that should be plan C if you absolutely don't want to use wheels for which this frame was designed.
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    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

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    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mm66554 View Post
    4). ..can I tighten it until the rear triangle gets pulled in by tension...(?)
    Definitely *not*!

    That goes double if your bike's not made of steel.

    Quote Originally Posted by mm66554 View Post
    Can I use ordinary wheels/hubs or do I need special type?
    Special type, I'm afraid.

  10. #10
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    OK anyone know of a good standard headset to get then? FSA Pig?

    Yeah the dropouts are 12mm, It's OK because I was gonna get new wheels anywhere (old ones are all buckled). Is 150mm the standard or should I assume that if size isn't listed then it will be 135mm?

    Also managed to get the pedals apart, now need to find a suitable washer.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by mm66554; 04-06-13 at 02:12 PM.

  11. #11
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    150mm is a non-standard hub. These are often on DH (downhill) wheels. You won't get 12x150mm hubs unless the spec's. clearly say that's what they are. It would be listed as a key sales feature.
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    An ounce of diagnosis is worth a pound of cure.

    “Never argue with an idiot. He will only bring you down to his level and beat you with experience.”, George Carlin

    “One accurate measurement is worth a thousand expert opinions” - Adm Grace Murray Hopper - USN

    WARNING, I'm from New York. Thin skinned people should maintain safe distance.

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