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Old 08-14-13, 06:39 PM   #1
grevian
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Problems with my Stem on a Trek DS 8.3

I had two questions I was hoping you guys could help me with, First is it possible to raise the handlebars on my Trek DS 8.3 any higher than they are right now? I'm a tall guy, about 6'5", and I raised my seat which alleviated some knee pain I was having, but now I'm getting wrist pain and I'm hoping raising my handlebars will settle that. I think I might be maxed out already though, and I'm not sure if there's anything else I can do.

So I watched some youtube videos and popped my stem off my steerer tube to see how much room I had to work with, and discovered a huge hole rusted through my stem! Is this a common thing? Is it safe to ride? Did my LBS screw up assembling the bike when I first got it (Only about a year ago)?

Here's a link to a several pictures of the stem, both on the steering post and off. Thanks for your he

http://imgur.com/a/9abRL
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Old 08-14-13, 07:55 PM   #2
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Don't see any rusted hole. I do see the hole into the stem's extension as is a common design. There are three ways to raise the grips (and they are all that count as that's where your hands are). A bar with a higher rise to it's bend. A stem with a more upward angle to the extension. A steerer extender which goes on top of the fork's steerer to get a higher mounting point for the stem. Replacing the stem is the easiest, replacing the bars have likely more amount of position change then a stem change does. Installing a steerer extender brings into the arena the possibility of more parts to loosen and a greater leverage factor on the fork's steerer. Andy.
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Old 08-14-13, 08:31 PM   #3
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Thanks Andy! I didn't realize the hole into the stem extension was a common design, The edge is sharp/jagged, and has a bit of bright orange rust around it, so I thought it had rusted through, maybe that's just on the tip where it was unevenly ground or something (Still doesn't leave me feeling super good about its construction!)

I'll head into my LBS and ask about a stem with a higher angle, and maybe ask them to fit me on the bike again. I rode a 24km bike trail today and by the end, my toes were numb, my wrists were sore, and my elbows were screaming, So something is still not right about my posture :-(
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Old 08-14-13, 10:05 PM   #4
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Have you done this "bike trial" before? If so then a comparison from before and after (bike positioning changes) can be made. If this was your first (or second) then some of your issues could be from the body not being ready for the stresses. Typically the greater the need for power and agility on a bike the more the lean forward. Yet you ask about being more upright... maybe i don't understand what a "bike trial " is. Andy.
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Old 08-14-13, 10:10 PM   #5
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"bike trail" not "trial", just a paved bike path that runs in a loop in my city. A longer than usual ride for me, I commute 7km each way, 4-5 times a week, and I'm trying to ride this trail at least once, but preferably twice a week, This is the 4th time I've ridden it and I've had similar issues each time.
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Old 08-15-13, 12:20 AM   #6
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Threadless type .. either a sharper up angle stem, a stem riser which is fitted in place of the stem, then,

the stem you have fits on top of it, ... An adjustable angle stem,

or get dealer to order a new fork .. that will ship un cut..then the stem goes where you wish , sandwiched between spacers..

all options require, all the cables be replaced , since they were made up to suit the lower height.


Rusted through? now a-days stems are not steel ..

The stel fork steerer may be the source of Iron oxides , seen on the aluminum stem.

Last edited by fietsbob; 04-26-14 at 08:08 AM.
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Old 08-31-13, 11:15 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Threadless type .. either a sharper up angle stem, a stem riser which is fitted in place of the stem, then,

the stem you have fits on top of it, ... An adjustable angle stem,

or get dealer to order a new fork .. that will ship un cut..then the stem goes where you wish , sandwiched between spacers..

all options require, all the cables be replaced , since they were made up to suit the lower height.


Rusted through? now a-days stems are not steel ..

Actually I've seen the rust myself. I have a 2012 8.3 and there was actually some rusting going on inside the stem. Since I was replacing the stem with one from another manufacturer I just cleaned off everything.
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Old 04-25-14, 08:12 PM   #8
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Grevian,
Have you managed to replace either the stem or handlebar? I got a used 8.3 DS today and didn't realize that the stock "riser" handlebars coupled with a straight stem make it more of a mountain bike stance rather than a hybrid. I am going to order a 100mm (4") and a 5" handlebar to start and see which works best for me. I am tempted on buying and adjustable stem but will probably hold of to see what is the difference with the handlebar alone. Let me know if you had any success.
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